Balancing Act by Ensamble Studio

| 9 comments

Balancing Act Balancing Act by Ensamble Studio photograph by Roland Halbe

Venice Architecture Biennale 2010: two enormous girders slice through the Arsenale exhibition at the Venice Architecture Biennale thanks to Madrid architect Antón García-Abril of Ensamble Studio.

Balancing Act Balancing Act by Ensamble Studio photograph by Roland Halbe

Above and top photographs are copyright Roland Halbe

Entitled Balancing Act, the installation comprises one girder balanced across the other, supported at one end by a metal spring.

Balancing Act Balancing Act by Ensamble Studio

A rock perched atop the other end acts as a counter-weight.

Balancing Act Balancing Act by Ensamble Studio

The installation forms part of the exhibition People Meet in Architecture, directed by Kazuyo Sejima of SANAA (see our earlier Dezeenwire story).

Balancing Act Balancing Act by Ensamble Studio

The Venice Architecture Biennale continues until 21 November. See all our stories about it in our special event category.

.

Balancing Act Balancing Act by Ensamble Studio

.

See also: Trufa by Anton García-Abril, a house cast in the earth and hollowed out by a cow.

.

Balancing Act Balancing Act by Ensamble Studio

.

The text that follows is from Ensamble Studio:


BALANCING ACT

Balancing Act is a play of balance. Two structural lines in the longitudinal space of the Arsenale buildings, which operate as a reagent to modify the original space.

Balancing Act Balancing Act by Ensamble Studio

.

The interference caused by generating a diagonal incision, cuts on the bias the previous line marked by the old structure. The harmony between the two structures now contiguous forms a space from the two systems that meet, face and compare each other.

.

Balancing Act Balancing Act by Ensamble Studio

.

Click above for larger image

The Arsenale will be a complex compositional series, an architectural “fugue”, in which different spaces follow one another, and in which the dissonant balance of the Balancing Act is just one chord.

.

Balancing Act Balancing Act by Ensamble Studio

Click above for larger image

Project: Balancing Act
Location: Venice Biennale
End of building construction: August 2010
Author of the project: Antón García- Abril

Collaborators: Ensamble Studio:
Débora Mesa
Ricardo Sanz
Alba Cortes
Juan Ruiz
Tomaso Boano
Federico Letizia
Quantity surveyor: Javier Cuesta
Sponsor: Positive City Foundation


See also:

.

Emergency Exit by Kurant
and Wasilkowska
The Russia Factory by Tchoban,
Khoroshilov and Revzin
All our stories from Venice
Architecture Biennale 2010
  • Felix

    is there actually a cable above the spring? that kind of ruins the whole thing, but it's a nice idea. i like how it combines consideration of engineering and feeling of space.

  • mmm

    I've read a review about the Venice Biennale that is was very light in content. Which was at the same time liberating and somewhat disappointing. For this project the lightness definitely irritates me – some gimmick-like entertainment is hardly worth the effort to travel to Venice for.

  • fergus

    its more disappointing that the girders are made of a timber frame and plaster or something like that and then painted to look like concrete. Impressive at a first glance but on further inspection…. can't imagine richard serra creating a sculpture that pretended to be corten steel! However the video of how Antón García and his family live in the heremoscope house and follows spain through the world cup is very nice part of the exhibition. As the models and the other videos

  • jack

    It's a nice, interesting idea but, please, please will designers/architects/artist etc stop using such pretentious descriptions. Finding out more of the background to works gives us interesting insights but, "The harmony between the two structures now contiguous forms a space from the two systems that meet, face and compare each other."
    Really?
    Plus (as Fergus noticed) if it ain't real, it ain't real.

  • bodkin

    why the spring? surely the point of a counterbalance is to do just that, it completely takes away from the potential drama of the work in that you subconsciously know it could never fall and therefore there is no need for the counterbalancing rock. i just don't get it

  • Mark

    It would be more interesting if there were another spring instead of the rock and it touched the celing… it would appear as though the column was in constant tension and compression by the two spring forces.

  • http://www.fxexchangerate.com/ fxgeorges

    Most interesting. The tower is a bit Brutalist with all that heavy concrete and the tiny dashed bands of clerestory windows — sensible for theater and music rehearsal spaces, however. Nice tension between wide open and very closed. Doesn't seem Valencian, but maybe that doesn't matter: depends on the context.

  • antonio

    someone remember the reference of the project of the linear city, in the same room of this? the one explained by a video and a plastic on the left end corner of the room… i looked for it on the web without succes, could someone help me finding it?

  • http://www.axzy.nl/dagaanbiedingen.html dagaanbiedingen

    It would be more interesting if there were another spring instead of the rock and it touched the celing… it would appear as though the column was in constant tension and compression by the two spring forces.