House in Tróia by Jorge Mealha Arquitecto

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House in Troia by Jorge Mealha Arquitecto

Doors in this Portuguese house by Jorge Mealha Arquitecto are rendered in the same material as the walls to give the impression of closed blocks around a terrace. 

House in Troia by Jorge Mealha Arquitecto

Located on the Tróia peninsular, the residence features a series of interlocking volumes creating a series of recessed, shaded patios.

House in Troia by Jorge Mealha Arquitecto

The following details are from Jorge Mealha Arquitecto:


House in Tróia

For the surrounding ground, a Set of virtually blank solids perform a dialectically tensioned play, searching, through scale and accentuation on the surfaces edges outlines, the emphasis on the light/shadow interplay, proposing an ever changing reading throughout the day.

House in Troia by Jorge Mealha Arquitecto

The outline and voiding of the mass proposes an articulation of solids and wall surrounded patios, succeeding each other in the organization of a rhythmic sequence of a fluid program.

House in Troia by Jorge Mealha Arquitecto

The openings either of limited dimensions or placed in the interstitial spaces, in between the various solids, allow, in a quite controlled way, the fruition of chosen frames.

House in Troia by Jorge Mealha Arquitecto

The scale, the openings and the skylights, become instruments for light capture and redirection, either diffused or of a direct nature, drawing and sprinkling with light the interior planes throughout the daylight cycle.

House in Troia by Jorge Mealha Arquitecto

Within the inner perimeter, a sequence of horizontal and vertical interplays between the various solids, voids and outlines, create the spatial identity structure of the house.

House in Troia by Jorge Mealha Arquitecto
With plastered blank shutters, in the same finishing as the coating of the outside walls, when shut, lead to virtually blank solids, in the pursuit of a clear reading of the format.

House in Troia by Jorge Mealha Arquitecto
Some ambiguities in the reading and definition of the containing and the contained elements inter-relations plays with the observer's capacity and interest in the decoding of space and shape design.

House in Troia by Jorge Mealha Arquitecto

Architect: Jorge Mealha
Location: Clube Soltróia, plot 82, Tróia, Portugal
Project Team: Arch. João Sítima, Arch. Luís Banazol, Arch. Pedro Pereira, Arch. Marcelo Dantas
Client: Private
Project Area: 388,50 m2
Photographs: Jorge Mealha

House in Troia by Jorge Mealha Arquitecto

House in Troia by Jorge Mealha Arquitecto

House in Troia by Jorge Mealha Arquitecto

House in Troia by Jorge Mealha Arquitecto

House in Troia by Jorge Mealha Arquitecto

House in Troia by Jorge Mealha Arquitecto

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House in Troia by Jorge Mealha Arquitecto3

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House in Troia by Jorge Mealha Arquitecto

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House in Troia by Jorge Mealha Arquitecto

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House in Troia by Jorge Mealha Arquitecto

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House in Troia by Jorge Mealha Arquitecto

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House in Troia by Jorge Mealha Arquitecto

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House in Troia by Jorge Mealha Arquitecto

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House in Troia by Jorge Mealha Arquitecto

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House in Troia by Jorge Mealha Arquitecto

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House in Troia by Jorge Mealha Arquitecto

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See also:

.

Black & White House
by AGi architects
House by EASTERN
Design Office
House by Studio
Architecture Gestalten
| 8 comments

Posted on Tuesday, December 14th, 2010 at 12:35 pm by Catherine Warmann. See our copyright policy. Before commenting, please read our comments policy.

  • http://lettuceoffice.com nico

    the photos are magnificent

  • http://www.facebook.com/mdenteuling Maarten Den Teuling

    wherever you look, it looks like a composed artwork. Fantastic project!

  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/javier-rojas javier agustín rojas

    outstanding project. simple and very well detailed. i can imagine that house happily inhabited.

  • Marchello

    Quite a common problem with some talanted architects – for them it's too boring to think about interior. Shape of the house from outside doesn't live with the interior. I've got the feeling, that architect shaped this beautiful artpiece and then he missed the time to think how hits gonna look from inside…

  • Timian

    Was this home designed for a severe agoraphobic? Yes, the massing and composition are beautiful, but the lack of windows or any sense of the world outside would drive me from the home in days. I see this so often now, too. Buildings so clearly designed from the outside in, no ugly windows to break up the architect's precious lines and forms. Pretty to walk by, horrible to live in.

    • Jorge

      Timian,
      In fact this house has a lot of windows. The game was in fact give that idea, but if you look closer to plans and elevations you will notice that some rooms have even more than one window.
      This house works in fact as a controlled perspective device to the surrounding spaces, enjoying the landscape and avoiding to see some close houses just nearby.
      It is in fact a house intensively used by an large family who take advantage of a quite diversified range of complementary spaces. It really works as a convivial device, a nice place to live.
      Thanks for your comment.
      Jorge

  • Bryan

    Is it just me or does every project by a Portuguese architect look identical? Alvaro Siza lives

    • Filipe Ventura

      Is our style, our language. Very minimalist, clean and try to be cost effective.

      If you have some interest in Portuguese Architecture, you need to understand our history…try to do some resource and you will see, since we can call our territory Portugal we always had problems: with low in natural resources, poor people, very small country, and mentality…and our architecture is a reflection of that (of course with some exceptions).

      And for me is a good example what you can do with low resources. With affordable materials and using one of the most important “material”: light!

      Filipe Ventura