Sun Moon Lake visitor centre by
Norihiko Dan and Associates

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Sun Moon Lake Administration Office by Norihiko Dan and Associates

Tokyo architects Norihiko Dan and Associates have completed this visitor centre on the shore of Sun Moon Lake in Taiwan.

Sun Moon Lake Administration Office by Norihiko Dan and Associates

Housing the tourist board's offices and an information centre for visitors, the building has a green roof and rises out of the surrounding land towards the lake.

Sun Moon Lake Administration Office by Norihiko Dan and Associates

Curved concrete channels lead round the structure towards the lake.

Sun Moon Lake Administration Office by Norihiko Dan and Associates

A basin of water between the building and the lake reflects a rippling image of the surrounding trees.

Sun Moon Lake Administration Office by Norihiko Dan and Associates

The building will open to the public on 25 February.

Sun Moon Lake Administration Office by Norihiko Dan and Associates

The information below is from Norihiko Dan and Associates:


Sun Moon Lake Administration office of Tourism Bureau —A landform for dialog between the human being and nature

Sun Moon Lake Administration Office by Norihiko Dan and Associates

This is one of the projects from an international competition held in Taiwan in 2003 for four representative sightseeing locations in Taiwan called the Landform Series. It is a project for an environment management bureau that houses a visitor center in the Sun Moon Lake Hsiangshan area.

Sun Moon Lake Administration Office by Norihiko Dan and Associates

The site just touches the narrow inlet extending almost south-north at its northern tip, has a narrow opening facing the lake-view direction, and extends relatively deep inland along a road. Looking towards the lake, the lake surface looks like it is cutout in a V shape as mountain slopes close in from both sides.

Sun Moon Lake Administration Office by Norihiko Dan and Associates

That is, although the site is for the Sun Moon Lake Scenery management bureau, it doesn’t have a 180° view of Sun Moon Lake as can be enjoyed from the windows and terraces of the hotels standing on a typically popular site.

Sun Moon Lake Administration Office by Norihiko Dan and Associates

In most cases with sites like this, the building is positioned on the lake side to secure the greatest view possible, and thus the inland side tends to become a kind of dead space.

Sun Moon Lake Administration Office by Norihiko Dan and Associates

As the basic policy for the design, my first aim was to propose a new model for a relationship between the building and its natural environment while preserving the surrounding scenery and keeping the inland area from becoming dead space.

Sun Moon Lake Administration Office by Norihiko Dan and Associates

My second priority was to address the disadvantages of the site whose view of the Sun Moon Lake is not necessarily perfect, and to draw out and amplify the potential advantages.

Sun Moon Lake Administration Office by Norihiko Dan and Associates

One way to solve the first problem was to pursue a new relationship between the building and its surrounding landform.

Sun Moon Lake Administration Office by Norihiko Dan and Associates

Since long ago, buildings have generally been built “on” landforms, but there have been cases in which they have been built within landforms, such as the early Catholic monasteries of Cappadocia and the Yao Tong settlements along the Yellow River, and there have also been such classics as Nolli’s map that considered the building as the ground which can be curved or transformed, similarly to the landform, in a conceptual sense.

Sun Moon Lake Administration Office by Norihiko Dan and Associates

Due to the fact early modernism negated in totality the methods of self-transformation—including the poche method that belonged to pre-19th century neoclassicism in particular—and demonstrated an inability to adapt to the complex and diverse topography in such areas as east Asia, I believe that 20th century architecture actually gave rise to the phenomenon of land development projects that “flattened” mountains, an approach that is almost synonymous with the destruction of nature.

Sun Moon Lake Administration Office by Norihiko Dan and Associates

In fact, the very key to linking buildings with landforms lies in these issues that have been ignored by modernism.

Sun Moon Lake Administration Office by Norihiko Dan and Associates

In this project, in order to emphasize a sense of horizontality to the architecture, I added more soil taken from construction for the foundation to the volume of the building conventionally required, and designed a composition in which the building on the lake side and a sloping mound on the inland side are in gradual and continuous transition.

Sun Moon Lake Administration Office by Norihiko Dan and Associates

By adopting this composition I planned the design so that continuity is regained between the building and the landform to form an integrated garden rather than having the building sever the landform.

Sun Moon Lake Administration Office by Norihiko Dan and Associates

For the second theme, I designed an extensive axial layout by rerouting the approach flow-line from the road to that it extends far inland and then curving it back as far as possible via two large arches spanning 35 meters each, to create a sense of dynamism that leads to the lake surface.

Sun Moon Lake Administration Office by Norihiko Dan and Associates

Moreover, I set up a near-view water basin in contrast with the distant-view lake surface to enhance the water surface effect by mirroring the distant view upon it.

Sun Moon Lake Administration Office by Norihiko Dan and Associates

The fact it is only possible to view the lake surface distantly from a relatively narrow angle means that the site—fortunately free of nearby buildings—is surrounded 360° by a lush sea of trees.

Sun Moon Lake Administration Office by Norihiko Dan and Associates

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I saw this as the second undulating surface and opened up the upper part of the building by greening it to create continuity with the natural surroundings.

Sun Moon Lake Administration Office by Norihiko Dan and Associates

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These two surfaces—the union of the lake and water basin surfaces, and the resonance of the building’s greenery on the upper part with the surrounding undulating sea of trees—are connected via the tunnel-shaped diagonal path that cuts and penetrates through the interior of the building, and through the slopes carved into the building like mountain paths, to create a multitiered landform.

Sun Moon Lake Administration Office by Norihiko Dan and Associates

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This half-architectural and half-landform project is conceptualized as a stage setting to bring out and amplify a hidden dimension of the scenery and environment of Sun Moon Lake, and at the same time create a new dialogue between the human being and nature that provides another new dimension to this area.

Sun Moon Lake Administration Office by Norihiko Dan and Associates

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Translator: Izumi Tanabe
Architect(s): Norihiko Dan and Associates

Sun Moon Lake Administration Office by Norihiko Dan and Associates

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Project team: Norihiko Dan, Tadashi Yoshimura, Eiji Sawano, Minghsien Wang, Masato Shiihashi
Project management: Norihiko Dan and Associates
Collaborator(s): Su Mao-Pin architects

Sun Moon Lake Administration Office by Norihiko Dan and Associates

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Structural engineer: Structure Design Group(Japan), Horn Gyun Engineering Consultants Ltd.(Taiwan)
Electrical engineer: Uichi Inoue Engineering Laboratory(Japan), Huan-Chiou Electrical Engineering Co.(Taiwan)

Sun Moon Lake Administration Office by Norihiko Dan and Associates

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Landscape architect: Norihiko Dan and Associates(Japan), Su Mao-Pin architects(Taiwan)
Lighting engineer: WORKTECHT CORPORATION(Japan), Cheng Yi Lighting Co., Ltd.(Taiwan)

Sun Moon Lake Administration Office by Norihiko Dan and Associates

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(General) Contractor: HUACHUN Construction Co., Ltd.(Phase 1), YIDE Construction Co., Ltd.(Phase 2)
Client: Sun Moon Lake National Scenic Area Administration

Sun Moon Lake Administration Office by Norihiko Dan and Associates

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Location: No.599, Zhongshan Rd., Yuchi Township, Nantou County 555, Taiwan (R.O.C.)
Use: National Scenic Area Administration, Visitors’ Center

Sun Moon Lake Administration Office by Norihiko Dan and Associates

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Site area: 33,340 m2
Bldg. area: 6,639.59 m2
Gross floor area: 6,781.21 m2

Sun Moon Lake Administration Office by Norihiko Dan and Associates

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Bldg. coverage ratio: 19.9 %
Gross floor ratio: 20.3 %
Bldg. scale: zero story below ground, two stories above ground


See also:

.

Visitors centre for Copenhagen
by EFFEKT
Visitors centre for Tibet by
Standardarchitecture-Zhaoyang
Visitors centre for South Korea
by G.Lab*
  • http://lettuceoffice.com nico

    !!!!! The concrete work is incredible!

  • http://www.aflo.mx aflo

    super nice concrete shaped !!

  • Danillo

    Zaha anyone? I'm not a fan of this futuristic spaceship-esque typology, but to each his/her own!

  • Bryan Whitman

    This concrete work is amazing!

  • http://individual.cl/ æon

    The pictures throw lines very similar to a hand made sketch.

    Recently I've been seen many projects with similar lines, curves with those proportions. The first one I remember is the Mercedes-Benz Museum.

  • bob

    I hate it when big shot architects use the word "I" when describing projects. " I added more soil…" "MY first aim was to propose a new model…" "I planned the design…"
    Everybody knows there was a team of talented people doing the work. In fact the partner probably did the least of the workload, since he or she has so much other stuff going on.
    So next time you describe a building, please use the word "WE" instead.. It implies there was a team working together, and not a solo ego architect. Your clients will like that better too.

    • http://blog.faverodesign.com/ Sean

      You assume too much. First, instead of ranting on what you hate about big time architects become one yourself and then you can say "WE" instead of "I". Second, I personally like it when someone takes responsibility for their work. Third and last it has been this way forever. I got a patent for a design that has a bunch of other names on it and my supervisor at the time got credit for it and in this case it was solely my idea. Most of art from times past consist of a group of people and we only give the only leader credit. I'm sure he or she has earned it, . . . get over it.

  • http://www.davestasiuk.com Dave S.

    Amazing concrete work…really beautiful design and execution.

  • ste

    as empty and hollow as zaha… but less beautifull… so what? many curves are not as fluent as they should be… some perspectives shows without doubt that walls and roofs are not perfectly smooth… thats not what i would excpect when i would pay millions for a concrete work!!

    • Gusto

      In defense of the concrete work, I don't think the smooth prefab look is what they were going for. I for one like to see the evidence of timber formworks, and in many ways this project reminds me of the ground floor of Corb's Unité in Marseille. Any architecture that provokes touch is successful.

  • shmark

    Damn! I was totally already planning to design this…Haters gonna hate. Beautiful project.

  • polo

    much more beautiful than zaha's work. It doesn't strike me as futuristic at all. There is a subtle japanese sensibility. I hate the infinity pool/lake though.

  • Nicole B

    This only resembles Zaha Hadid's aesthetic superficially. Just because there are curves doesn't necessarily mean it's automatically inspired by her brand of design. It's disappointing that there is so much shortsightedness and critical shorthand among those making comments here. Where is the depth of insight here?

    I'd say this is probably closer to Tadao Ando more than anything else in its use of concrete and its dialogue with landscape.

  • 立早嘉

    張基義老師說:日本建築師團紀彥(Norihiko Dan)設計的日月潭向山遊客中心由國際網路建築雜誌Dezeen刊登,無需觀光局花錢買廣告或外交部買外交。建築設計力,絕對是國家展現實力與決心的重要指標。
    我返台17年,厭倦評選案委員空泛要求設計單強調地方特色。團紀彥的作品告訴我們,創造出一個與地景環境融合的作品。設計彰顯日月潭的寧靜氛圍,遠比幼稚的圖騰雕花來得動人。⋯⋯大膽開放國際競圖往前走,台灣還是會留下來世界一流建築。開放鐵定是雙向的,外國建築師走進來,台灣建築師走出去。多年旅行目睹世界上千個一流作品,過半為外國建築師作品。
    現在的創新,絕對是未來的歷史。正視建築設計品質是契機。

  • rac

    surprised to see such impulsive judgement and shortsightedness at comparing this interesting project with zaha.. neither the form (beyond being freeform and curvilinear) nor the texture/feel of material are any close to her works…besides, these days for her designs, they rarely show inside views, drawings and never detail drawings..
    agree with tadao ando comment… can relate to some extent to oscar niemeyer.. love the Japanese sparsity and austere simplicity of spaces, the quality of light and the rough texture of concrete reminiscent of the wood used to give it the form… glad to see a work which will stand the test of time and be as beautiful over the years unlike aluminum clad facades and graphic plans..

    • aooth

      totally agree with your comment, rac

  • Salu

    really interesting this work! the phrase "to propose a new model for a relationship between the building and its natural environment" reminded me of a structure that I have seen in Croatia, the Zamet Centre, http://www.florimsolutions.com/en/pg-s-31-456-1-z… where the urban structure respected throughout the territory, indeed, the structure improved it

  • http://twitter.com/huang_yu_shu @huang_yu_shu

    Here is the accommodation for the visitor who wants to visit this centre on a low budget: http://sunmoonlake-couchsurfing.blogspot.tw/