New York by Gehry

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New York by Gehry at 8 Spruce Street

Frank Gehry's residential skyscraper, New York by Gehry, is nearly complete.

New York by Gehry at 8 Spruce Street

The rippling stainless steel exterior covers three faces of the tower and creates bay windows for some of the 903 apartments inside.

New York by Gehry at 8 Spruce Street

The 265 metre-high tower is now the eighth tallest building in New York and the tallest residential building in the Western Hemisphere.

New York by Gehry at 8 Spruce Street

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New York by Gehry at 8 Spruce Street

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New York by Gehry at 8 Spruce Street

Photography is by dbox, apart from where otherwise stated.

New York by Gehry at 8 Spruce Street

Above image is copyright Gehry Partners, LLP

Here is some more text from the developers:


At 870 feet tall, New York by Gehry is the tallest residential tower in the Western Hemisphere and a singular addition to the iconic Manhattan skyline.

New York by Gehry at 8 Spruce Street

For his first residential commission in New York City, master architect Frank Gehry has reinterpreted the design language of the classic Manhattan high-rise with undulating waves of stainless steel that reflect the changing light, transforming the appearance of the building throughout the day. Gehry's distinctive aesthetic is carried across the interior residential and amenity spaces with custom furnishings and installations.

New York by Gehry at 8 Spruce Street

Above image is copyright Gehry Partners, LLP

Gehry's innovative incorporation of bay windows creates the tower's dynamic silhouette as well as an exceptional variety of panoramic views from within the residences. By shifting the bay windows from floor to floor and tailoring their configuration for each residence, Gehry has given residents the opportunity to, as he puts it, "step into space."

New York by Gehry at 8 Spruce Street

Click above for larger image

New York by Gehry's 22,000 square feet of indoor and outdoor amenity spaces, together with comprehensive concierge and lifestyle services, offer residents an experience found only in world-class hotels and resorts.

New York by Gehry at 8 Spruce Street

Click above for larger image

  • simon

    In the end it's just a standard building with a fancy (crumpled up) wrapper – what ever it is, it looks like it melted inthe sun.
    Another self-satisfied building joins the city of objects.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1361545807 Nina Telesca Magnani

    A stunning skysculpture! Who cares who can or can't afford it!

  • Lisa Nuttall

    Just freaking gorgeous!
    He blows me away every time. Original, innovative, inspiring.
    I can't wait to see it.

  • Kevin

    Try something new Gehry! I beg you to stop with the lame interior and tin foil facades. Americans may like shiny objects but you cant hide behind shinny forever.

    Not only does it look like it is melting but this building, like Gehry's other buildings, are causing problems to their neighbors. This one even went so far as to start lighting its neighbors roofs on fire through solar reflection.

    This fact alone makes it impossible for this to be good design.

  • hooty

    Steef I agree.

    Amazing, but why are there no photos of the spaces inside….

  • zinu

    it is more like a facade design than an architectural design..!!!!
    yet looks stunning…

  • frencis

    So Terrible!! Gehry destroyed NY’s beautiful classic view…

  • mark

    A lesson to be learned: Even crumpled sketch paper in a bin can be turned into a high rise in NY … Another lesson to be learned: Alway empty your trash bin before your boss ..!

  • meringue

    getting closer the façade looks like a watch chain……but Rolex kind !!!!!!!!!!!!

  • robertconnscott

    There is but one vantage point from which this building inspires: on the walkway of the Brooklyn Bridge, looking through the thicket of cables. Otherwise the design is banal applique from last week's enfant terrible, thus instantly dated. Remember the chatter about po-mo and the AT&T building? (Pity that Sony can't take the funny hat off.) Put it this way, would you rather live in Chicago's forever elegant Lake Shore Tower or this?

  • gabriela

    Too high for the panorama
    The masses will surely like it
    I was attracted by it first but dislike it more and more the more I learn about it

  • Kate

    These pictures look so nice but don't tell the full story. It's doesn't acknowledge that one or two sides of this building were just completely neglected. I was shocked when I saw it from the other angle.

  • LJG

    Magnificent execution and great assembly… but nothing new for our eyes… Ghery’s same -repeated- mistake! What a shame…

  • bernshi5

    …i’m always fascinated with Gehry’s architecture…but this one …its just too superficial…going back to baroque architecture….i don’t feel the sense of true architecture…too Dubaiesque…

  • Anon

    If i were to get a picture of those bridges i would be sure to angle it with this building out of them… or get crazy with photoshopping it out

    just because its interesting doesnt mean its good

  • http://studiophizz.blogspot.com studiopHizz

    Nice Piece of Architecture, Would Love If It Was Finished with some other light form of material than this foils.

  • win frantzen

    It's interesting and, appropriately, controversial…Delicious and so New York! Vive la difference!

  • Angelique_00

    it's the solution of continuity on the pure facades of New York City

  • Totto

    The spirit of the Jazz Age lives on! A worthy companion to the mysterious Chrysler Building. Absolutely stunning, the best reason to visit Manhattan again!

  • Sama Khalid

    I liked this dynamic design because it represented something new and contributed to the development of the city. It is, in fact, absolutely fantastic how Gehry took something so boring as a skyscraper and made it so interesting. Looking from a distance, the texture of the facade is beautiful and very refreshing. It’s just an ordinary box tower, with a facade happily played with the ripple on the surface.