Rounded Loft by A1 Architects

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Rounded Loft by A1Architects

A stainless steel net takes the place of a banister around the staircase and first floor corridor of this apartment in Prague.

Rounded Loft by A1Architects

A1 Architects converted the former attic of an apartment block into a two-storey residence with living rooms and bedrooms on the lower level and a guest suite on the upper floor.

Rounded Loft by A1Architects

Illuminated timber bookshelves are arranged like a wall of bricks behind a staircase that ascends from the living room, whilst two hollow bottom steps provide additional storage space.

Rounded Loft by A1Architects

Walls and ceilings in this room and elsewhere in the apartment have rounded edges.

Rounded Loft by A1Architects

The apartment also contains a marble and granite kitchen, grey-plastered feature walls and exposed timber columns.

Rounded Loft by A1Architects

A1 Architects previously designed a larch-clad teahouse with a tall roof - see our earlier story here.

Rounded Loft by A1Architects

Photography is by David Maštálka of A1 Architects.

Here are some more details from the architects:


Rounded Loft

Prague, Czech Republic
Lenka Křemenová & David Maštálka / A1 Architects

At the beginning of the year 2010 we had started designing grand attic loft in Prague. It was a new challenge for us to deal with almost "boundless" space for living according to our previous experience focused mainly on small scale.

Rounded Loft by A1Architects

The issue of "boundless" space became the main motif of our work. The private spaces such as bedrooms are of course separated, but the rest of common activities rooms are connected within one fluent space.

Rounded Loft by A1Architects

It starts at the entrance hall with dressing wardrobes and slightly continues towards living space and kitchen with large dining table, the space is also opened to upper gallery which is meant for guests. To reach specific fluency of space we decided to round off some of the interior corners, which finally give the space its unique smooth character.

Rounded Loft by A1Architects

Due to these softened corners one moves and feel simply free and the boundaries of walls somehow disappears. Even the staircase with integrated fireplace and library climbs up in rounded corner. The railing is made out of thin stainless steel net, so it is safe but even smooth and transparent.

Rounded Loft by A1Architects

Next to the main continuous living space there are three bedrooms and one study room, and some storage spaces integrated mostly as built in furniture.

Rounded Loft by A1Architects

The issue of materials was another important part of the project. Their main attributes are touchableness and pure naturalness. We chose carefully many of them together with clients at stone workshop and joinery. Most of wooden furniture were tailor made pieces.

Rounded Loft by A1Architects

Beige large format tiles are used on all attic floors to support the feeling of continuity. We exposed as much of the wooden bearing structure as we could.

Rounded Loft by A1Architects

The kitchen counter is made out of black granite stone which is next to bright marble on the wall behind. There is used walnut wood for the dining table and ash veneer for the light above.

Rounded Loft by A1Architects

The living space is connected with the kitchen by raw grey plaster.

Rounded Loft by A1Architects

Client: private person
Authors: A1 Architects
MgA. Lenka Křemenová, MgA. David Maštálka
Project: A1 Architects
Floor area: cca 220 m2
Realisation: 2011
Study: 2010

  • Crackerjack

    Very nice, the netting seems a little ill-considered though.

  • ept

    That net doesn't look like it would be sufficient to break a fall..

    • Herder

      It's steel…

  • Vincent

    I appreciate the creative approach, but the net look a bit too cheap for the high-end house. Everything else looks so well finished.

    I can vagely remember something alike, but with connected cables. That would also have the advantage of accentuating the curves. This looks like it's there to keep the birds out.

  • http://designandmotion.net John Evans

    I agree. It looks more attractive from above than seeing it below. Not for me, but I wouldn't turn it down if they gave it to me, especially in Prague.

  • http://www.facebook.com/rowingrunder Rowin Grunder

    Really like! Love the idea of implementing the netting.

  • jjf

    thats a steel mesh net, provided the fixings are strong the nets safe as you like… ps i like the net

  • Tom Ford

    About 15 years ago, I made a drum out of a sheet of wood veneer and used it as a lampshade. Many others have done the same. Good to see Prague architects are "broadening" their horizons…

  • http://thebarenecessitiesblog.blogspot.com/ zee

    I find it sad that it could be anywhere in the world.
    The design is so 'clean' and new that there are very few cues left about the original building, the fact that it is in Prague, etc.

    We've seen so much of this 'international magazine' style of interior design, personally I would welcome a new generation who starts letting the existing site speak more, and try to be locally sensitive – even if it is a slippery slope.

  • http://twitter.com/danbulgen @danbulgen

    I want to live there! This is beautiful… love the mixer of materials.

  • xtiaan

    Im just thinking falling onto that steel netting would be like hitting a giant cheesegrater, ouchies!

    plus it looks kinda naff, the netting itself is fine, but the way its just kinda tacked on with that pipe isnt working for me at all. Given the choice of materials in the space a natutal fibre net might have been more appropriate and could have been fixed to the wall in a less intrusive manner

    • John

      Ouchies perhaps, but its not like you would do that everyday…

  • Z_Design

    I love it!
    But the steel net is the only thing im not a fan of, it just looks way too industrial for something very beautiful, calm and subtle.

  • Toni

    To be fair i think the steel netting is nice and looks good in the house it's different from buildings like it and a true artist or designer just wants to get their work talked about and even though you may not like it the designer is still getting constuctive critisuim which they can then use to their advantage.

  • Toni

    i think the netting is a nice touch and the designer went to a new level which gets them noticed.