Rishikesh House by Rajiv Saini + Associates

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Rishikesh House by Rajiv Saini + Associates

A scooping concrete roof cantilevers over the rear entrance to a house by the Ganges River in northern India.

Rishikesh House by Rajiv Saini + Associates

Mumbai architects Rajiv Saini + Associates designed the single-storey residence, which burrows into the sloping riverside terrain.

Rishikesh House by Rajiv Saini + Associates

A spa is located where the building tunnels into the hill and a tree-lined courtyard is concealed between the house and landscape.

Rishikesh House by Rajiv Saini + Associates

Rough masonry walls define the main entrance, while both angular and curved concrete walls separate individual rooms.

Rishikesh House by Rajiv Saini + Associates

Slatted timber columns surround an oval dining room at the heart of the house.

Rishikesh House by Rajiv Saini + Associates

Three bedrooms and two living rooms are also provided.

Rishikesh House by Rajiv Saini + Associates

Concrete, brick and stone walls are exposed throughout the interior, whilst floors are finished in sandstone.

Rishikesh House by Rajiv Saini + Associates

Photography is by Sebastian Zachariah.

Rishikesh House by Rajiv Saini + Associates

The following text was provided by the architects:


Rishikesh House

The first visit I made to see the site changed all pre conceived ideas one had carried about the form this house should take.

Rishikesh House by Rajiv Saini + Associates

Located on an elevated hill slope, over looking the ‘Ganges’ river as it turned around a bend, the unbridled energy of the gushing river became the one constant inspiration and the form of the house attempts to reflect some of that raw energy.

Rishikesh House by Rajiv Saini + Associates

Designed as a holiday house/retreat on the haridwar-rishikesh route, it helped to be working with old clients who shared a passion for design, and also trusted us enough to embark on this radical design. The requirements of the house were simple-three bedroom suites and enough casual /informal spaces to lounge around with family and friends and soak in the virgin territory all around.

Rishikesh House by Rajiv Saini + Associates

Driving along the long winding drive way (that does not reveal the spectacle of the magnificent river view) leading to the house, one approaches the structure between two 12 feet high, tightly placed almost parallel walls of random stone masonry (all stone used for random masonry walls in the house was quarried locally) that lead you into an enclosed court bound with walls on 3 sides.

Rishikesh House by Rajiv Saini + Associates

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Only on stepping inside through the teak wood doors does one comprehend the expansive river views. The large entrance space, along with the deck outside, functions as an informal lounging zone. It also encloses an elliptical, glass and teak framed dining enclosure. Crossing over a bridge from here, one passes through an internal court before descending into the lowered living room.

Rishikesh House by Rajiv Saini + Associates

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The master suite along with its en suite bathroom (and outdoor court with outdoor shower) is located to one side of the living room. Through a long glazed corridor lined with a grove of bamboo trees, one accesses the bedrooms and TV lounge on the other side. This glazed corridor is contained between the river facing bedrooms on one side, and the retaining wall holding up the bermed soil that conceals the presence of the spa tucked to one side of the entrance walls. A small court ensures enough natural light, while offering total privacy to its users.

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In keeping with the location and form of the house, we played along with natural materials and finishes inside. Ceilings throughout are in form finished concrete, as are most retaining walls. Remaining internal walls are in white painted unplastered bricks or random rubble masonry.

Rishikesh House by Rajiv Saini + Associates

Click above to for larger image

The flooring throughout the public and circulation areas is in textured ochre coloured sandstone, while the bedrooms are finished in timber. Bathrooms too are clad in local stones or teak timber, and custom solid teak wood furniture along with linen and cotton furnishings was used throughout the house.

  • joseph

    Talk about expensive

  • rock

    it's great to see brave + radical work in raw materials, well done.
    … but are the curtains needed?!!
    with that view! + there's no neighbours!!!

  • edward

    Looks a bit heavy handed, but the central living area and it's furnishings are impressive.

  • http://www.hiburimpro.co.il/2011/09/14/הפקת-אירועים-לחברות/ ימי גיבוש לחברות

    somehow it's not relaxing, and not blending at all with that beautiful surroundings. innovative but too radical.

  • https://www.facebook.com/global.randy Randy Long

    wow- that's awesome. love the formed concrete where it shows the impression of wood planks.

  • http://www.insonwood.com Inson Wood

    Week interiors, but fantastic use of the scupper as organizational method to inspire circulation and structure. The elevation lacks cohesiveness, but the section is note worthy in how it effects the flow of space and light.

  • Alex in Dover

    The view is magnificent! But the house appear to be very intrusive in its beautiful surrounding. From the angle photos at a first glance it seems alright, but from the straight front view, the building does not quite pull it together. And the entrance is really heavy, what is the point with that, a fling of neo-brutalism?