Multi-level apartment by Peter Kostelov

| 14 comments

Multi-level apartment by Peter Kostelov

Russian architect Peter Kostelov has slotted a timber structure into a two-storey apartment in Moscow to create two extra floors.

Multi-level apartment by Peter Kostelov

The former top level of the apartment had ceiling heights of up to 8 metres, where the architect has inserted a mezzanine and new upper storey.

Multi-level apartment by Peter Kostelov

Openings in the walls of the wooden structure allow views between rooms on different levels, as does a cutaway in the ceiling of the middle floor.

Multi-level apartment by Peter Kostelov

Bespoke angled lamps hang from the ceilings of the billiard room and dining room on this level, while specially designed furniture fills rooms throughout the apartment.

Multi-level apartment by Peter Kostelov

Marbled tiles line the floor, walls and surfaces of the kitchen, which opens out to a second dining room on the lower floor.

Multi-level apartment by Peter Kostelov

On the top floor, a semi-circular window stretches across the walls of a master bedroom and study.

Peter Kostelov refurbished another Moscow apartment in 2009, for which he used industrial materials, but readers thought that one was a bit too much like a prison. Take a look at it here.

Multi-level apartment by Peter Kostelov

Photography is by Alexey Knyazev.

Multi-level apartment by Peter Kostelov

The following text is from Kostelov:


Multi-level apartment

Characteristic of this apartment is its inner space and cubic capacity.

Multi-level apartment by Peter Kostelov

It is located on the top 18th floor.

Multi-level apartment by Peter Kostelov

Initially it was a two level apartment of total houseroom of 258 sq. meters.

Multi-level apartment by Peter Kostelov

As for the first level it was quite common one: three meter standard height of ceiling and a houseroom of 69 sq. meters.

Multi-level apartment by Peter Kostelov

The second level houseroom was larger 189 sq. meters and the height of ceiling varied from 3 to 8 meters in different zones.

Multi-level apartment by Peter Kostelov

Surely these unique space peculiarities caused project direction: to not only exploit maximum of this nonstandard extreme height but to make multi-level space.

Multi-level apartment by Peter Kostelov

The owner of the apartment approved the idea, moreover it was requested that each member of the family should have extra space so that everyone including 3 children of different age and gender could have their private space for comfortable living.

Multi-level apartment by Peter Kostelov

Central part of the apartment on the second level was as large as 60 sq. meters and more than 8 meters high.

Multi-level apartment by Peter Kostelov

The space was vertically divided into two levels by the newly made third level.

Multi-level apartment by Peter Kostelov

After making necessary calculation on the thickness of overhead cover 0,5 m. was put as required space for structural beams, placing ventilation and final trimming.

Multi-level apartment by Peter Kostelov

The highest ceiling 4,5 m was chosen for the living room located at the lower part of the second level. The upper part on the second level got 3m., where a bedroom, a bathroom and a study room are located. Thus the third level added 54 sq. m to the apartment.

Multi-level apartment by Peter Kostelov

The covers between second and third floors have two clear spaces. One was left for the staircase, while the second one, the closest to the window, appeared to join two spare spaces of the second and third level, the flow of light of which makes partially two-tiered space.

Multi-level apartment by Peter Kostelov

On the third level a dome made by glass partitions separates a bedroom and a study room, which allows the light to spread evenly. The floor space of 9 sq. m. was added to 20 sq. meters of the lower level. Consequently the floor space of each nursery room got 30 sq. m located on two levels.

Multi-level apartment by Peter Kostelov

A home library ceiling in the right –hand side of the apartment is 4,4 m. The same as in children’s room the second level was made here which enlarged it to 8 sq. m. All in all 35 sq. m was added to houseroom.

Multi-level apartment by Peter Kostelov

Rearranging turned a duplex apartment into four-level apartment having added to it 90 sq. m. of extra house room (from 258 sq. m. up to 348 sq. m.)

Multi-level apartment by Peter Kostelov

Click for larger image

Nearly all pieces of furniture (except settees and beds) were specially designed.

Multi-level apartment by Peter Kostelov

Click for larger image

The owners gave preference to warm and light colors.

Multi-level apartment by Peter Kostelov

Click for larger image

In contrast to upholstering the furniture was made from natural processed metal: dinner and low tables, bookstands, stools, shelves.

Multi-level apartment by Peter Kostelov

Click for larger image

Location: Moscow, Russia
Built Area: 348 m2
Architecture, Interior Design: Peter Kostelov
Development effort: Kovaleva T.N., Egorova N.G. “OAO Mosproect”
Projecting: 2009
Building: 2010-2011

  • NLM

    Beautifully Executed. Combines richness with simplicity. It seems fun to explore, full of surprises, and even mysterious at times.

  • http://www.granitetransformations.com Alex Levin

    what a brilliant way to use the space under the stairs

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1169867097 Tim Humphreys

    Wow. the tile pattern in that kitchen is disconcerting.

  • Marco

    It is very characterful and rich in detail, and it is honest and consequent in its approach. However, the gloomyness and heavyness of the materialisation would make me personally feel very uncomfortable in these spaces. The spaces are somehow dominant and authoritarian.

  • zetre

    Heh, that's like a weird modernist inner-city datja.
    I can't quite wrap my head around all the material choices, but I think I love it!

  • http://evoarchitecture.blogspot.com Ove Christensen

    Really beautiful crafted. I can't stop thinking about Adolf Loos – Moller House.

  • http://www.zazous.co.uk/ Nick Austin

    Bit bleak.

  • pjlr

    Apparently, electricity is free in Moscow (and those inverted bucket lights are terrible). But then again, the rest is rather terrible also.

    • jeremyG

      When you have a 348 sq meters apartment, I don't know if you care a lot about your electricity bill…

  • zee

    so refreshing to see somebody with his own style, and not some interior decoration magazine wannabe.

    the kitchen proportions look a bit klunky, and the bathrooms have no natural light – but overall the project seems beautiful and refined – feels like a real place, and will most likely become warmer once inhabited with personal belongings.

    I also like the previously featured appartment.

  • http://twitter.com/FrancosBruvva @FrancosBruvva

    Austere as a Cistercian monastery

  • @ilanel

    Awful. Dark, busy and depressing! and that's without furniture and stuff… Clearly they got money (Diesel Living galore) but that's about it !

  • Snowhite

    How can anyone live in that space and being comfortable ? I agree with the previous comment that the space will be dominant over the owner, not the other way round.

  • Andrea

    just love it! very artistic