Enbutsu-do at Eifuku-ji Temple by
Zai Shirakawa Architects & Associates

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Enbutsu-do at Eifuku-ji Temple by Zai Shirakawa Architects & Associates

There are 88 ancient Buddhist temples along the 670-mile Shikoku Pilgrimage in Japan - but only one lucky priest has a new house by Tokyo studio Zai Shirakawa Architects & Associates.

Enbutsu-do at Eifuku-ji Temple by Zai Shirakawa Architects & Associates

Seventy-seven windows cut obliquely into the thick walls of the three-storey building are oriented to maximise light at different times of the year and frame views of nearby mountains.

Enbutsu-do at Eifuku-ji Temple by Zai Shirakawa Architects & Associates

Above photo is by Daichi Ano

The Eifuku-ji Temple is the 57th temple along the 670-mile trail and the new house is positioned behind it, alongside the original house.

Enbutsu-do at Eifuku-ji Temple by Zai Shirakawa Architects & Associates

Administration for the temple takes place in an office that occupies most of the ground floor, while bedrooms are located on the first floor and living rooms are on the storey above.

Enbutsu-do at Eifuku-ji Temple by Zai Shirakawa Architects & Associates

Above photo is by Daichi Ano

Another Japanese studio completed a residence for a Buddhist priest with a curved concrete roof back in 2010. See it here.

Enbutsu-do at Eifuku-ji Temple by Zai Shirakawa Architects & Associates

Above photo is by Daichi Ano

Enbutsu-do at Eifuku-ji Temple by Zai Shirakawa Architects & Associates

Other stories we've featured about temples include a Shiv temple in India and a temple for atheists in London.

Enbutsu-do at Eifuku-ji Temple by Zai Shirakawa Architects & Associates

Photography is by Toru Kitamura, apart from where otherwise stated.

Enbutsu-do at Eifuku-ji Temple by Zai Shirakawa Architects & Associates

Above photo is by Daichi Ano

Here's a little more information from the architects:


Enbutsu-do at Eifuku-ji Temple

This project is composed of four wings including Enbutsu-do Hall at Eifuku-ji Temple in Ehime Prefecture, Shikoku, Japan.

Enbutsu-do Hall, house for chief priest, should be such a place as a cave which keeps his private life quiet from many visitors to the Temple.

Enbutsu-do at Eifuku-ji Temple by Zai Shirakawa Architects & Associates

Above photo is by Daichi Ano

Each of 77 windows cut oblique through the 700mm (max.) thick exterior walls has its own function, and plays its role freely in the thickness of the wall.

Enbutsu-do at Eifuku-ji Temple by Zai Shirakawa Architects & Associates

The one that puts light from the sky in looks upward, and the other that interrupts summer light and accepts winter light looks northwards.

Enbutsu-do at Eifuku-ji Temple by Zai Shirakawa Architects & Associates

Above photo is by Daichi Ano

Taking the surrounding elements of various scales such as visitor’s circulation, placement of the main hall, appearance of the mountain behind, and movement of the daylight into consideration, the windows with different inclinations are pierced on the exterior walls.

Enbutsu-do at Eifuku-ji Temple by Zai Shirakawa Architects & Associates

Above photo is by Daichi Ano

The building was completed in autumn, 2011.

Enbutsu-do at Eifuku-ji Temple by Zai Shirakawa Architects & Associates

Click above for larger image

Enbutsu-do at Eifuku-ji Temple by Zai Shirakawa Architects & Associates

Click above for larger image

Enbutsu-do at Eifuku-ji Temple by Zai Shirakawa Architects & Associates

Click above for larger image

Enbutsu-do at Eifuku-ji Temple by Zai Shirakawa Architects & Associates

Click above for larger image

Enbutsu-do at Eifuku-ji Temple by Zai Shirakawa Architects & Associates

Click above for larger image

Enbutsu-do at Eifuku-ji Temple by Zai Shirakawa Architects & Associates

Click above for larger image

  • ppt

    kind a weird building, I like it when I see the detail section, but from the other views looks a bit boring.