Mouth Factory
by Cheng Guo

| 19 comments

These tools by Royal College of Art graduate Cheng Guo are controlled by simple mouth movements like chewing and blowing (+ movie).

Mouth Factory by Cheng Guo

The Mouth Factory includes a drill, a lathe and machines for rotational moulding and vacuum forming.

Mouth Factory by Cheng Guo

Above photo is by James Champion

There is also a silver 'tongue extruder' which fits inside the mouth and squeezes out Play-Doh when the user extends their tongue.

Mouth Factory by Cheng Guo

The drill is mounted on a headpiece and operated by making a chewing movement to turn the drill bit.

Mouth Factory by Cheng Guo

The vacuum forming tool allows the user to mould objects by inhaling through a tube. A plastic sheet is melted and placed on the fibreglass mould before the air is sucked out by the user, forcing the material into the shape of the mould.

Mouth Factory by Cheng Guo

Above photo is by James Champion

With the rotational moulding tool, the user fills the mould with resin before blowing on the attachment to spin it round as it sets.

Mouth Factory by Cheng Guo

The lathe lets the user hold the cutting tool in their mouth while spinning the wood which is held in place by the headpiece.

Mouth Factory by Cheng Guo

Cheng Guo recently graduated from the RCA's Design Products course. Have a look at Dezeen's movie of course leader Tord Boontje giving a tour of the work on display at Show RCA 2012.

Mouth Factory by Cheng Guo

Above photo is by James Champion

See all our stories from Show RCA 2012 »

Photographs are by Grey Chen, except where noted.

Here's some more information from the designer:


Mouth Factory is inspired by the concept of human enhancement which has developed along with the progress of civilisation, from basic physical exercise to the adoption of enhancing apparatus all the way to the genetic engineering boomed in recent decades.

Mouth Factory by Cheng Guo

Above photo is by James Champion

I've always been interested in human behaviour in a given condition or environment, the subconscious control of one's own body as well as enhancement of human capability, which is either overlooked or underestimated due to our familiarity with our own bodies.

Mouth Factory by Cheng Guo

The reason I chose the mouth as the subject matter to work with is that although it is such a wondrous organ, its capabilities and versatility is still underdeveloped. Apart from linguistic communication, food mastication and respiratory function which we take for granted in everyday life, the human mouth could also undertake many other functional tasks.

Mouth Factory by Cheng Guo

For example, using the mouth to replace the functions of handicapped body parts, performance acts such as using the mouth to pull a van, and special behaviours that occur in certain environments such as licking a wound.

Mouth Factory by Cheng Guo

Above photo is by James Champion

From the macroscopic point of view, by enhancing the capabilities of a frequently used yet underdeveloped organ, this project aims to investigate and present the reciprocal relationship between human body and various synthetic appendages, as well as the possible effects on the body imposed by those devices.

Mouth Factory by Cheng Guo

To some extent, Mouth Factory also renders and amplifies the aesthetic of human body and the rhythmicity of the repetitive behaviour when people are operating these performative devices, as well as a sense of beauty for the machines in production.

Mouth Factory by Cheng Guo

Above photo is by James Champion

Teeth lathe:
This wearable teeth lathe is driven by bows that are operated by hand. Two one-way bearings hiding in the pulley wheel of each side allow the axle to rotate in a single direction only. Instead of using lower front teeth as the cutter, which was the initial idea, the user will grip a silver steel blade with his teeth to shape the spinning material.

Inhaling vacuum form machine

Air is drawn out of the fibreglass mould by mouth after melting the plastic sheet mounted on it. Due to the vacuum inside, the atmospheric pressure will force the sheet material to fit on the internal surface of the mould. Then the formed plastic will be fixed after cooling down. The piston in the acrylic air chamber prevents the user from inhaling the toxic gas of heated plastic. The group of one way valves are used to hold the air in the mould when user breathes.

Blowing rotomolding machine

After placing a pair of silicone moulds in the aluminum container, mixed resin is injected into the mould from the side hole. Then the user can blow the fan blade as well as sway the head, which makes the container rotate around two axises. The whole process can last about five minutes.

Chewing drill

The biting force of a human being is about 13-35kg. This chewing drill uses a set of rack gear to transfer the biting force into torque. The chuck can hold various bits such as a drill bit, screw driver bit, sander bit, milling cutter, etc.

Tongue extruder

The shape of this extruder came from the casting of designer’s oral cavity. It is oral -safe due to the feature of silver material. After putting the chewing gum or play-doh into the extruder, user is supposed to eject his tongue to push the material come through the die in order to complete the extrusion process.

The movie above shows a mouth workout with movements designed to strengthen the mouth and improve the user's tool skills.

  • Thi

    While watching the video, all I can imagine is how difficult it must be to be this guy. Doesn’t seem to make life any easier does it? Interesting though.

  • D0ubled

    There’s an episode of South Park where Mr. Garrison creates a new form of transport that is controlled by a dildo up the rear, and one at the front for a mouth control. This doesn’t seem any less invasive or ridiculous.

    • Thi

      Lol, this made my day.

  • Tiezte

    This vid made me nervous, watching him while working his ass off for nothing. But interesting anyway.

  • jey

    I can see potential to develop this for the disabled even though that was not your intention. It could be interesting to see it being evolved for that reason, including other tools.

  • Bhavnesh

    Blowjob?

  • Tony

    You have in-built dust extraction too… straight into your mouth and lungs. The future of population control perhaps?

  • mksh

    Yet another pointless Royal College of Art project. As the French say: “c’est du n’importe quoi”.

  • thomas

    The Inuits drill in whalebone, using a very simple and hundred times more effective drill, one part held between the teeth, a bow and only one hand is needed to drill. This project is a total waste of time and energy. Too much 'belly-button staring'.

  • Carl

    To attempt a drill (however powered) one must surely understand what drill bits should be used in a given scenario – In the film a timber drill bit was used on masonry and it is fairly obvious that the initial screw failed in masonry as there was no rawlplug.

    As mentioned in an earlier post, this should however be commended for looking at alternative ways of powering everyday objects and must surely have mileage for impaired users but the actual practicalities that are often easy to ignore must be tackled and incorporated or this is just design fluff.

  • gwk

    I’m sorry, but I don’t get why this is published. It’s as useless as inventing a bike with square tires, just because it isn’t there yet. The funny part is that you have to use your hands a lot to prepare it so you don’t have to use your hands while using it. I get why it’s interesting as a design project at RCA because of all the out of the box thinking and using your mouth as hands and all. He must have learned a lot from doing such an odd project, but why is this published?

  • http://dailygrail.com/ Red Pill Junkie

    Multitasking U R doin’ it wrong! I mean, the first thing I thought while watching the first video is that you’d need to have the jaw muscles of a crocodile in order to drill more than one hole —and that’s just in drywall. What about concrete?

    OK, I lied —the really first thing I thought was remembering Marylin Manson’s The Beautiful People video ;)

  • rather not to say

    Come on, this doesn’t belong to design, it should be in “art” or “rubbish” or “gadgets”.

  • http://10STERLING.com Clive369

    "I chose the mouth as the subject matter to work with is that although it is such a wondrous organ, its capabilities and versatility is still underdeveloped. Apart from linguistic communication, food mastication and respiratory function which we take for granted in everyday life, the human mouth could also undertake many other functional tasks."

    As if simply talking, eating and breathing are much to get excited about. Pah! What an excuse for an organ.

  • Adrian

    This would be brilliant for people with disabilities – just replace the jaw-breaking with a small motor and use the mouth as the on off switch

    I should patent that if it’s not already!

  • santiago gordo

    Esta es la cosa mas estupida que he visto en mi vida!

  • Nick

    Where does one purchase those two-way brass shaft collars? Lovely hardware!

  • eee

    So kinky.

  • http://oktopus.com.au/ Bianca W. Cote

    Those contraptions look unnerving and very comforting. Could be mistaken for something out of Machines of Malice. I don’t see them becoming household items.