Wall House by Anupama Kundoo
at Venice Architecture Biennale 2012

| 3 comments

Wall House by Anupama Kundoo at Venice Architecture Biennale 2012

Indian architect Anupama Kundoo brought a team of Indian craftsman to Italy to construct a replica of a house inside the Arsenale at the Venice Architecture Biennale.

Wall House by Anupama Kundoo at Venice Architecture Biennale 2012

The building is a full-sized model of a house that Kundoo, who currently practices in Australia, completed in 2000 in Auroville, India.

Wall House by Anupama Kundoo at Venice Architecture Biennale 2012

The craftsman, many of whom had never left India before, worked with students from the University of Queensland and the IUAV in Venice on the construction.

Wall House by Anupama Kundoo at Venice Architecture Biennale 2012

The walls are built from hand-made Indian clay bricks, contrasting with the ancient Venetian brick columns of the Arsenale.

Wall House by Anupama Kundoo at Venice Architecture Biennale 2012

The architect claims that terracotta pots are decreasingly used for cooking in the part of India mentioned, which is why they are used for the ceilings on both storeys of the structure.

Wall House by Anupama Kundoo at Venice Architecture Biennale 2012

A dining table is positioned in the central space and is made from only a single log of wood, without any leftover material or any additional joinery.

Wall House by Anupama Kundoo at Venice Architecture Biennale 2012

Photographs of the original house hang from the walls of some rooms, while a storeroom serves to display the different building materials.

Wall House by Anupama Kundoo at Venice Architecture Biennale 2012

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Wall House by Anupama Kundoo at Venice Architecture Biennale 2012

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Wall House by Anupama Kundoo at Venice Architecture Biennale 2012

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Wall House by Anupama Kundoo at Venice Architecture Biennale 2012

Here's a short description from the exhibition:


Feel the Ground. Wall House: One to One

Kundoo, an Indian architect now based in Australia, has built an ambitious 1:1 facsimile of the Wall House, a building she designed in Auroville, India in 2000.

Wall House by Anupama Kundoo at Venice Architecture Biennale 2012

The common ground is in its making. A team of Indian craftsmen, some of whom had never before left their home country, were brought to Venice to construct the project in collaboration with staff and students from the University of Queensland and from IUAV in Venice, creating a skills exchange across three continents.

Wall House by Anupama Kundoo at Venice Architecture Biennale 2012

The final piece embodies the dialogue between construct on cultures, and also is a showcase for Kundoo's architecture, a lyrical modernism at ease with the demands of its climate.

Wall House by Anupama Kundoo at Venice Architecture Biennale 2012

  • Past the Roman Age

    Ah, the Romans are back!

  • Cubasur

    ”The craftsman, many of whom had never left India before…” !!

    This is the second time i am hearing this mentioned in the context of Indian architecture abroad. The first being the V&A exhibition ‘Architects build small spaces’ a nearly similar recreation of a built environment within a museum. Superbly irrelevant.

    India is bigger than all of western Europe so i’m sure they’re well traveled.

    • steve

      Building craftsmen in India are pretty low in the normal pecking order. The overwhelming majority would most certainly not have traveled outside India, unless they were part of indentured gangs working in the Gulf.

      On the other hand, probably the majority of qualified professional architects are urbane, often very well traveled, and have a huge range of responses to the contrasts between India and places like Western Europe. The ones I find most interesting are those who have made a point of finding a way of producing buildings that seek to return some of the empowerment to the craftsmen – to leave room for craft based decision making for instance. It is within this proposition that it is so relevant to mention, each time, the typical horizons of an Indian building craftsman.