Lycée Georges Frêche by
Massimiliano and Doriana Fuksas

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Italian architects Massimiliano and Doriana Fuksas have completed a school for hotel management in Montepellier, France, clad in anodized aluminum triangles and punctured by 5000 unique triangular windows.

Lycée Georges Frêche by Massimiliano and Doriana Fuksas

The Lycée Georges Frêche occupies two curvy cast-concrete buildings connected by footbridges over a courtyard.

Lycée Georges Frêche by Massimiliano and Doriana Fuksas

Above image is by Studio Fuksas

The facade is pulled up on one side to create a tunnel through which students and staff enter.

Lycée Georges Frêche by Massimiliano and Doriana Fuksas

Above image is by Studio Fuksas

As well as classrooms, offices and accommodation for students and staff, the complex includes a hotel and three restaurants that are open to the public, accessed from the opposite side of the campus.

Lycée Georges Frêche by Massimiliano and Doriana Fuksas

The walls of the school and student accommodation are painted in a different colour on each floor.

Lycée Georges Frêche by Massimiliano and Doriana Fuksas

Other projects by Massimiliano and Doriana Fuksas we've featured on Dezeen include a concrete church in Italy and a glowing orange music hall in France.

Lycée Georges Frêche by Massimiliano and Doriana Fuksas

See all our stories about Massimiliano and Doriana Fuksas »
See all our stories about Montpellier »

Lycée Georges Frêche by Massimiliano and Doriana Fuksas

Photography is by Moreno Maggi unless otherwise stated.

Here's some more information from the architects:


Massimiliano and Doriana Fuksas inaugurated a new public building in France: the Georges-Freche School of Hotel Management in Montpellier. Besides the architectural project that won the competition launched by the Région Languedoc-Roussillon in 2007, Fuksas architects have realized the interior of the spaces open to public: a hotel and three restaurants. Built on 3.95 acres in the ZAC Port Marianne area to the East of Montpellier, the hotel-school Lycée Georges Frêche transforms the landscape and provides it with a distinct urban identity.

Lycée Georges Frêche by Massimiliano and Doriana Fuksas

Above image is by Studio Fuksas

Massimiliano and Doriana Fuksas’ project, which is developed horizontally, comes across as a single entity. It has a formal diversity, compact volumes and sculptural shapes. The volumetric complexity, which can be seen even inside the building, gives every room its own spatial individuality.

Lycée Georges Frêche by Massimiliano and Doriana Fuksas

The School includes:

- Two main buildings connected by footbridges that cross a tree planted central courtyard
- Accommodation for students (75 beds spread over three floors)
- Housing for management (10 apartments over 5 floors)
- Gym
- Athletic Track and sports ground situated outside

Lycée Georges Frêche by Massimiliano and Doriana Fuksas

The entrance for the students and the professors is through an arch while the entrance for the clients is on an opposite side. The two buildings that form the edifice make up the sculptural mass around which the gym, the students’ residence and the management’s housing gravitate. The first building, situated on the Titien Road, has three floors and includes: the multi-purpose room, the exhibition gallery, the administrative offices, the classrooms and the canteen that has exits leading towards the recreational areas outside.

The second building is distinguished by its Y form and is on two floors. Here, there are the spaces for the vocational teaching as well the areas dedicated to the hotel and the gastronomic restaurant: a hotel that is open to the public (12 rooms, 6 of which are two/three star, 4 four star and 2 suites); three restaurants, one of which is a gastronomic restaurant (50 places), a brasserie and a teaching restaurant (200 places in total), a bread-making workshop and a pastry making classroom. The gastronomic restaurant, the brasserie and the 4 star hotel showcase the School’s excellence and are the most important areas of the project.

Lycée Georges Frêche by Massimiliano and Doriana Fuksas

Massimiliano and Doriana Fuksas have designed the interior, the areas accessible to the public and the spaces devoted to the gastronomic sector and to the hotel. In the entrance hall leading to the gastronomic restaurant and to the hotel, there is a reception desk: a white lacquered sculptural object, mirroring the fluid forms and the solid character of the structure. The desk is covered with materials that are used for making boat hulls. Different types of originally designed tables and chairs define the spaces dedicated to the interaction between the public and the students. There is also the limited edition furniture specially made for the hotel.

The School walls and those of the students’ residence are painted in a different colour on each floor, with the shades ranging from yellow to green to magenta and orange. The colours serve as signage to distinguish the different spaces and activities. The project can be called “experimental” as much for its triangular shaped aluminium façade as for the use of reinforced concrete. Both materials have been adapted in order to be able to adopt specific shapes - curved and fluid – as required by the structure.

Lycée Georges Frêche by Massimiliano and Doriana Fuksas

The facades of the building have been constructed using 17,000 cases of anodized aluminum in triangular shapes. Each aluminum case is unique and bears its own specific bar code in order that it can be identified for its specific situation on the façade. The interaction between the facades reinforces the dynamic tension between the solid materials and the cavities, the light and the shadows, that are an inherent part of the project. The geometric design of the aluminum “skin” is developed further to apply to the 5,000 triangular glass frames that are mounted on metal nets. Each of these is different.

The structure of the building is made from reinforced concrete. To reproduce the curves of the volumes, the project has used "shotcrete" technology. Photovoltaic panels have been installed on the roof of the first building (multi-purpose room, exhibition gallery, administrative offices, classrooms, canteen) as well as on the roof of the apartments for the management.

  • Leo

    The building looks sad. The inner space is so dead. Yeeiiii for the green floor.

  • duykim

    I find it a little disappointing…

  • Bruno de Paris

    In my modest and personal opinion this building shows the distance between Zaha Hadid and architecture. This is architecture, in so many ways.

  • jan

    It has a prison-like feeling to me. The tiny windows, bare materials… sick building disease waiting to happen.

  • cethuesen

    Fun exterior design – but I’m amazed how little natural light comes through. But then again, what would you expect with 30% of every opening being a frame.

  • carsten

    I’m getting a Hadidache.

  • rejiewednamr

    Why such a thick frame? I dont think it’s supportive or anything… It just blocks a lot of the light entering the building :/

  • nix

    It seems he wanted to use the Pierrefitte frame again:

    http://www.archivesnationales.culture.gouv.fr/pie

    But are there columns in every classrooms? Classrooms aren’t supposed to be totally free space?

  • http://www.studioampluso.com bibo

    Are you happy, Mr. Fuksas?

  • holl

    Wow, regular ol’ square windows wouldn’t induce the degree of sadness these “unique triangular windows” do in me. And then, of course, there’s the rest of the uniquely depressing building.