Book Mountain
by MVRDV

| 17 comments
 

A tower of books is encased inside a glass pyramid at this public library that Dutch firm MVRDV have completed in Spijkenisse, the Netherlands (+ slideshow).

Book Mountain by MVRDV

Named Book Mountain, the building contains a spiralling trail of staircases, pathways and terraces that create a 480 metre-long route through five floors of bookshelves towards a cafe beneath the pyramid's apex.

Book Mountain by MVRDV

The library's glass form sits on top of a rectilinear brick base to give it a similar overall shape to the archetypal Dutch farmhouse, with low-rising walls, a large sloping roof and even a brick chimney.

Book Mountain by MVRDV

Visitors enter the library on the first floor and arrive in front of the bookshelf tower, which also integrates a reception counter.

Book Mountain by MVRDV

Unwanted flowerpots were recycled to provide the material for the shelves, which the architects describes as being both "fireproof and economic".

Book Mountain by MVRDV

Above: photograph is by Jonas Klock

The architects also acknowledge the hazard to books caused from direct sunlight through the glass roof, and claim that "damage to the books by sunlight is offset by their normal four year lifespan due to wear and tear from borrowing."

Book Mountain by MVRDV

As well as library facilities, the building also contains an auditorium, an education centre, meeting rooms, offices, shops and a chess club.

Book Mountain by MVRDV

Construction started on Book Mountain back in 2009, and you can see some of the original drawings in our earlier story.

Book Mountain by MVRDV

Other recent projects by MVRDV include a set of model houses on stilts and the competition-winning plans for a square-shaped peninsula covered in gardens.

Book Mountain by MVRDV

See all our stories about MVRDV »

Book Mountain by MVRDV

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Book Mountain by MVRDV

Above: photograph is by Jonas Klock

Photography is by Jeroen Musch, apart from where otherwise stated.

Book Mountain by MVRDV

Above: photograph is by Jonas Klock

Here's some more information from MVRDV:


A literal advertisement for reading: MVRDV completes Book Mountain and Library Quarter Spijkenisse.

Today Spijkenisse Book Mountain and the adjacent residential neighbourhood will be opened by Prinses Laurentien of the Netherlands. Manifesting itself clearly as a mountain of books on the towns market square, it is both an advertisement and an invitation for reading. Clever stacking of the buildings commercial functions produces its pyramidal form, which in turn, is wrapped in the libraries 480 meters route along bookshelves. Underneath the libraries barn shaped glass envelope the book gains a strong educational presence in this formerly agricultural community located close the docks of the Port of Rotterdam. The adjacent Library Quarter consisting of 42 social housing units, parking and public space is also a project by MVRDV, together with the Book Mountain it forms an exemplary eco-neighbourhood.

Book Mountain by MVRDV

Above: photograph is by Jonas Klock

The library is designed as an advert for reading, its visible presence and invitation holding great significance for a community with 10 percent illiteracy. From underneath the glass dome the library is visible from all sides, especially from the adjacent market square where the library appears as one big book mountain. Underneath its monumental glass envelope damage to the books by sunlight is off-set by their normal 4 year life-span due to wear and tear from borrowing.

Book Mountain by MVRDV

Above: photograph is by Jonas Klock

Located in the centre of Spijkenisse, the library with a total surface area of 9.300m2 sits on the market square next to the historical village church. Besides the library the building houses the environmental education centre, a chess club, auditorium, meeting rooms, commercial offices and retail. The exterior of the library refers in shape and materiality to the traditional Dutch Farm, a reminder of the towns agricultural past, which has grown from farming village to Ville Nouvelle in the past 40 years.

Book Mountain by MVRDV

Above: photograph is by Jonas Klock

The library had to accommodate a number of other partly commercial functions. The stacking of this non-library programme forms a pyramidal base on which platforms are projected, housing the libraries bookshelves and shaping a powerful symbol. The book platforms are connected via wide stairs and together form a continuous route of 480 meters around the mountain to its peak where a café offers panoramic views over this Dutch Newtown.

Book Mountain by MVRDV

Above: photograph is by Jonas Klock

In order to connect the former village centre visually and distinguish clearly between commercial and library programme, a ‘blanket’ of brick is laid over the neighbourhood and the libraries pyramidal heart. The Library sits on top of this with its floors, walls, ceilings and even doors made of the same brick. This consequent materialisation supports the public status of the library by communicating clearly the difference: behind the glass hood a library is visible, behind the brick sits the rest of the program.

Another reference to the towns agricultural past lies in the libraries bookshelves. Made of recycled flowerpots, these elements are simultaneously fireproof and economic and provide a perfect background to the books and accompany the visitors through the building by taking on the functions of banister, parapet, information desk and bar. They form another element in the building’s palette of brick, glass and wood: recycled materials. Book shelves out of reach play an important visual role, housing the libraries archive.

Book Mountain by MVRDV

Above: photograph is by Jonas Klock

Following the maximum permitted volume the Book Mountain is covered by a barn shaped glass envelope with wooden trusses resulting in a transparent almost open air library. Underneath the glass is a public space without air conditioning. In summer natural ventilation and sun screens result in a comfortable indoor climate, in winter under-floor heating and double glazing maintain a stable interior environment. The climate system is based on an innovative combination of proven technology such as underground heat and cold storage, natural ventilation and many other interventions. The award winning invisible integrated technology was developed by Arcadis in collaboration with MVRDV.

Book Mountain by MVRDV

Above: photograph is by Jonas Klock

The new public library is part of a larger plan to strengthen and intensify the town centre. MVRDV have also designed the neighbouring development of 42 houses for a local housing corporation. The apartments inside the plan vary strongly in size, from studio apartments to housing fit for large families, attracting a more diverse urban population. A folly-like tilted house is the centre of the ensemble of abstract traditional typologies: contemporary reference instead of nostalgic replica. Housing and library share a common materiality, public space and environmental technology. In terms of identity the project resembles an out of scale farm, at the same time referring to, and becoming, a monument to the agricultural past of Spijkenisse, and its growth towards a city. On the new market square the outlines of buildings demolished during the 1960’s mark the old centre which has been turned now into a new village centre for a growing town, not nostalgic yet respecting the history.

Book Mountain by MVRDV

The development of Book Mountain and the Library Quarter is currently translated into literature: titled “Make Some Noise”, later this year a mix between literature and photo novel will be published by 010/NAi Publishers describing the almost ten years it took to realise the building.

  • MArilyn

    There’s something about this that feels quite 1980s to me. I think it’s to do with the exposed brick and indoor planting. But I really quite like it and I’m not quite sure why!

    • jos

      I also like the fact that it doesn’t look too fancy or over-designed. The architecture sort of dissapears in the concept.

      • MArilyn

        Agreed. It feels like the books piled up and then the building happened around them.

      • Matt

        Totally agree with you both. It has some soul. Refreshing.

  • brian

    “Unwanted flowerpots were recycled to provide the material for the shelves.” How did they do this?

  • Khalif

    BrokeBook Mountain!

  • Edd

    Was also going to say it has a bit of a 1980’s vibe about it… Can’t quite put my finger on it but kinda reminds me of late 70s/80s pomo academic/institutional architecture. Still pretty cool scheme though!

  • omnicrom

    I’m not sure ALL the books will be loaned/read often enough to make the wear/tear vs light damage assumption all that valid but that’s just the empiricist in me.

    I like the interior and the book shelves. The exterior not so much but it looks like a nice place to work/read/relax.

  • galessa

    Oh, what a wonderful project! Let’s expose books to sunlight until they are completely destroyed! Oh, wait… it would be cheaper to make a bonfire instead…

  • internautas

    MVRDV, I hate you. You are too good. And there is not much to oppose you at the moment…

  • http://www.zazous.co.uk Zazous

    The book mountain looks amazing. I just hope they can afford to replace the books when they need to!

  • P.Whe

    I usually very much appreciate MVRDV's work, but am I the only one out there that thinks this building is just plain ugly?

    • AAAW

      Just what I was thinking.

  • Ng Cheuk Wa

    I don’t quite understand why he can assume the sunlight is off-set by their normal 4 year life-span due to wear and tear from borrowing. Is there any calculation after it, or just a claim from this fabulous company? I do hope that there is a good explanation behind this claim.

    That’s only my stupid thought. If I’m wrong I really have to say sorry about it.

  • verofiore

    So yeah, I'd die happy there.

  • Breadcrumbtrail

    The first building from MVRDV that I feel that I can take seriously. Nice interior.

    Its perhaps not a coincidence that the Ulm Public Library by Pritzker Prize winner Gottfried Böhm looks very similar.

  • Fizz

    Am I not reading this correctly, but there seem to be three rows of books running below the floor level of each stage that appear out of reach. Also, the location for the disabled lift is…?