Torre Júlia by Pau Vidal, Sergi Pons
and Ricard Galiana

| 2 comments
 

Bright shades of yellow and green help elderly people find their way around in this 17-storey housing block in Barcelona by Spanish architects Pau Vidal, Sergi Pons and Ricard Galiana (+ slideshow).

Torre Júlia by Pau Vidal, Sergi Pons and Ricard Galiana

"The building is divided into three communities and each community is assigned a different colour to facilitate orientation," Pons told Dezeen. "We've used yellow and two shades of green, one lighter and one darker. These colours are uplifting whilst also calming."

Torre Júlia by Pau Vidal, Sergi Pons and Ricard Galiana

Located beside a motorway on the edge of the city, the tower contains 77 government-allotted apartments for pensioners.

Torre Júlia by Pau Vidal, Sergi Pons and Ricard Galiana

A shared garden covers the top floor of the building, which Pons hopes will be used by both grandparents and grandchildren.

Torre Júlia by Pau Vidal, Sergi Pons and Ricard Galiana

Corridors and staircases wrap the exterior and lead into double-height communal spaces, which were designed to encourage residents to communicate with their neighbours. "The hallways were conceived as streets," explained Pons.

Torre Júlia by Pau Vidal, Sergi Pons and Ricard Galiana

At ground level, the building opens out to a small public square that it shares with a new sports centre and housing development.

Torre Júlia by Pau Vidal, Sergi Pons and Ricard Galiana

See more stories about housing, including an apartment block with a grid of chunky balconies.

Torre Júlia by Pau Vidal, Sergi Pons and Ricard Galiana

Photography is by Adrià Goula.

Torre Júlia by Pau Vidal, Sergi Pons and Ricard Galiana

Here's a project description from the architects:


Torre Júlia. Government-allotted housing for elderly people

This project forms part of the urbanization that is taking place in one of the lots left over after the construction of the Ronda de Barcelona, a bypass road, in 1992.

Torre Júlia by Pau Vidal, Sergi Pons and Ricard Galiana

A sports centre, a residential development and an old people’s home will all share the same space, creating a public area that will stretch from the street to a square giving access into the different facilities.

Torre Júlia by Pau Vidal, Sergi Pons and Ricard Galiana

A prominent feature in the city’s northern quarter, Torre Júlia rises up to a height of 17 floors.

Torre Júlia by Pau Vidal, Sergi Pons and Ricard Galiana

There are three areas in the building. Each community has a larger space assigned, where users carry out most of their collective activities. These spaces, the core of the proposed project, figure plainly on the building’s frontage, which is wrought entirely in concrete and works as a cantilever beam.

Torre Júlia by Pau Vidal, Sergi Pons and Ricard Galiana

Typical floor arrangement - click above for larger image and key

Wide corridors overlooking the city, stairs in all outdoor places, double-spaced areas and sun-shaded terraces configure a building that is intended to give elderly people an opportunity to socialize and engage in community activities.

Torre Júlia by Pau Vidal, Sergi Pons and Ricard Galiana

Site plan

Project team: Pau Vidal, Sergi Pons, Ricard Galiana
Address: Via Favència 348-350, Barcelona
Program: 77 Home Units, Facilities and Parking Space
Construction dates: Building 2009-2011

Torre Júlia by Pau Vidal, Sergi Pons and Ricard Galiana

First floor plan - click above for larger image

Client: Patronat Municipal de l’Habitatge
Collaborators: Gioia Guidazzi, Diana Sajdova
Consultants: Encarna García, BOMA, L3J, 3dLife, Ambar Fotografia, Artkitech, Estel Rosell
Contractor: Acsa

Torre Júlia by Pau Vidal, Sergi Pons and Ricard Galiana

Second floor plan - click above for larger image

Gross floor area: 8.391
Budget: 7.518.419
State: Built

Torre Júlia by Pau Vidal, Sergi Pons and Ricard Galiana

Section - click above for larger image

  • Enrique

    Excellent design! I like the amount of light emitted!

  • ie casanovas

    The tower is nice and I always like seeing it when I walk by. But the floor plans are extremely standard, and I think it’s a little too optimistic to call the collective spaces “streets”, although if they had the space to add them, then why not?

    It should be noted, though, that this building is not particularly open to the street and that the 77 units are mostly for single people or at most two people, so maybe it’s not enough people to sustain lively collective spaces. But, again, if they had the space to fit them in then why not? Especially since this is a municipal project and private developers don’t like this sort of thing.

    Xavier Monteys wrote about this tower that if the most efficient floor plan for small apartments really is this layout from the 50s, then it’d be better to spend time designing good windows, doors and furniture so that you can spend “hours spacing out” in his (loosely translated) words.