Hannibal Road Gardens
by Peter Barber Architects

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This terrace of eight houses by Peter Barber Architects is clad with timber shingles to match the neighbouring fences and sheds of a housing estate in east London (+ slideshow).

Hannibal Road by Peter Barber

"The building sits at the rear of a 1960s council estate, where there are little rear gardens, rickety sheds and a patchwork of wooden fences," Peter Barber told Dezeen. "Our building shares a similar aesthetic."

Hannibal Road by Peter Barber

The timber shingles also create an analogous pattern and texture to the brick walls of the surrounding residences, which face onto the same community garden as the new houses.

Hannibal Road by Peter Barber

Each house has at least two small terraces, whether on the roof or at ground level, and Barber hopes over time these will "get planted and personalised by the people that live there".

Hannibal Road by Peter Barber

The largest residence has seven bedrooms, while one has six and the others have either three or four.

Hannibal Road by Peter Barber

Half of the houses will be allocated to social housing tenants, while the other half will be sold.

Hannibal Road by Peter Barber

Isometric diagram - click above for larger image

Other housing projects on Dezeen by Peter Barber Architects include 25 new houses elsewhere in east London and a new urban quarter in west London.

Hannibal Road by Peter Barber

Site plan - click above for larger image

See more projects by Peter Barber Architects »

Hannibal Road by Peter Barber

Floor plans - click above for larger image

Photography is by Morley von Sternberg

Here's a few details from Peter Barber Architects:


Hannibal Road Gardens/Beveridge Mews

Hannibal Road Gardens is a social housing project set around a community garden in Stepney.

The proposal replaces a problematic strip of garages and creates a fourth side to a square within an existing housing estate with 3 slab blocks forming the other sides.

Hannibal Road by Peter Barber

Typical ground floor plan - click above for larger image

The newly landscaped and densely planted community garden created in the centre of the square will be overlooked by a delightful new terrace of eight contemporary family houses.

The new row of houses is conceived as a continuation of the timber garden fences of the existing housing blocks, being constructed from timber and configured as a series of stepped and notched south east facing garden terraces.

Hannibal Road by Peter Barber

Typical first floor plan - click above for larger image

The accommodation is predominantly made up of large family houses (3, 4, 6 bedrooms). These will be 100% affordable, 50% of which are to be socially rented.

Hannibal Road by Peter Barber

Typical second floor plan - click above for larger image

Key features:

» High density, large houses created on a difficult, single-aspect site;
» Innovative notched terrace typology, creating a variety of amenity spaces and outlooks;
» All courtyard houses have their own front door and a minimum of two large courtyards / roof terraces;
» Great example of collaborative approach to planning, working closely with Tower Hamlets Planners and Highways Officers.

Hannibal Road by Peter Barber

Typical roof plan - click above for larger image

Client: Southern Housing Group
Contract Value: c£1.5 million
London Borough of Tower Hamlets

  • Gordon

    Great scheme from a great practice. They look and feel very liveable. Cladding looks quite fixable over time.

  • Neil

    In the second picture the pattern looks like a cross between dollar signs and swastikas.

  • http://www.woodarc.co.uk Woodarc

    It is extremely brave to use such a large amount of timber shingles on the façades in an urban environment. Please revisit this project to see how they have weathered and fared after 18 months or more.

  • JuiceMajor

    Nice scheme but I think wrong choice of materials. Just thought brick with different colour might work better. The timber shingles do not add depth at all, making the elevation look flat!

  • http://twitter.com/Quinzark @Quinzark

    I am not a fan of Shingles anyway, so seeing such a large use of them puts me off. Time will tell how they hold to weathering and the other external factors.