Neil Barrett Shop in Shop
by Zaha Hadid Architects

| 25 comments
 

Zaha Hadid Architects has completed five new boutiques for Milan-based fashion designer Neil Barrett, with each one containing portions of an abstract volume that was designed in one piece (+ slideshow).

Neil Barrett Shop in Shop by Zaha Hadid Architects

Above: Shinsegae Main, Seoul

The "Shop in Shop" concept was devised to encompass four stores in Seoul and one in Hong Kong. The architects designed a free-flowing shape, then divided it up into 16 pieces that could be distributed to each of the stores for use as a modular display system.

Neil Barrett Shop in Shop by Zaha Hadid Architects

 Above: Shinsegae Main, Seoul

Referred to by Zaha Hadid Architects as an "artificial landscape", the curving shapes feature a variety of twists, folds and rotations that reference the moulded interior of Neil Barrett's flagship Tokyo store, completed by the studio in 2008.

Neil Barrett Shop in Shop by Zaha Hadid Architects

Above: Galleria Main, Seoul

Each block is different and can be used in a variety of arrangements to display different garments, shoes and accessories.

Neil Barrett Shop in Shop by Zaha Hadid Architects

Above: Galleria Main, Seoul

The stark white colour of the objects contrasts with the polished black flooring underneath. This monochrome theme continues throughout each store, where walls are painted in alternating shades of white and black.

Neil Barrett Shop in Shop by Zaha Hadid Architects

Above: Galleria Main, Seoul

The studio is now working with Neil Barrett to roll out more Shop in Shop stores in Beijing, Shanghai and elsewhere in Seoul.

Neil Barrett Shop in Shop by Zaha Hadid Architects

Above: Hyundai Daegu, Seoul

Zaha Hadid Architects has been busy over recent weeks. In the last month the studio has released images of a lakeside cultural complex underway in China, revealed designs for a complex of towers in Bratislava and launched a system of twisting auditorium seats. See more architecture and design by Zaha Hadid on Dezeen.

Neil Barrett Shop in Shop by Zaha Hadid Architects

Above: Hyundai Daegu, Seoul

As well as collaborating with Hadid, British designer Neil Barrett has also worked with Italian studio AquiliAlberg, who designed the angular scenography for his 2010 Autumn Winter catwalk.

Neil Barrett Shop in Shop by Zaha Hadid Architects

Above: Hyundai Daegu, Seoul

Photography is by Virgile Simon Bertrand.

Neil Barrett Shop in Shop by Zaha Hadid Architects

Above: Hyundai Daegu, Seoul

Here's some more information from Zaha Hadid Architects:


Neil Barrett Shop in Shop

A display landscape

The 'Shop in Shop' concept for Neil Barrett is based on a singular, cohesive project that is divided into sixteen separate pieces. Specific pieces have then been selected and installed into each of the four Neil Barrett Shop in Shop's in Seoul, and also into the Hong Kong shop; creating a unique display landscape within each store. Each separate element acts as a piece in a puzzle of the original ensemble, ensuring each shop maintains a relationship to the defined whole and with the other Neil Barrett Shop In Shop locations.

Neil Barrett Shop in Shop by Zaha Hadid Architects

Above: Hyundai Daegu, Seoul

The pieces have been carved and moulded from the original solid as pairs that define each other to create an artificial landscape that unfolds multiple layers for display. The emerging forms engage the same design principles adopted for the Neil Barrett Flagship Store in Tokyo; the characteristic peeling, twisting and folding of surfaces has been extended to incorporate double curvatures and rotations.

Neil Barrett Shop in Shop by Zaha Hadid Architects

Above: Hyundai Main, Seoul

Adaption to multiple conditions

The display landscape is a flexible modular system that allows multiple arrangements and adaptations according to specific locations and multiple conditions, developing an original space at every location. The pieces can be used individually or pieces can be used in conjunction with others from the collection accordingly to suit the scale and spaces of each shop, with each piece able to display shoes, bags or accessories.

Neil Barrett Shop in Shop by Zaha Hadid Architects

Above: Hyundai Main, Seoul

Materiality

The Shop in Shop concept continues the geometries of the Tokyo Flagship Store, developing a dialogue between the Cartesian language of the existing envelope walls with the sculptural, smooth finish of each piece. This contrast of materials in combination with the formal language of the design plays with these visual and tactile characteristics and is further accentuated by the black polished floor.

Neil Barrett Shop in Shop by Zaha Hadid Architects

Above: Hyundai Main, Seoul

Neil Barrett Shop in Shop designs are located in Seoul and Hong Kong:
» Galleria Main, 3F, Galleria Luxury Hall East, 515, Apgujung-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul
» Hyundai Main, 4F, Hyundai DPS, 429, Apgujung-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul
» Shinsegae Main, 5F, Shinsegae DPS, 52-5, Choongmuro 1-ga, Jung-gu, Seoul
» Hyundai Daegu, 2F, Hyundai DPS, 2-ga, Gyeosan-dong, Jung-gu, Daegu. Seoul
» The Landmark, B1/F, 15 Queen’s Road Central, Hong Kong

Zaha Hadid Architects and Neil Barrett are continuing their collaboration on further Shop in Shop concepts to open in Beijing, Shanghai and Seoul.

  • Paul Puzzello

    I would love to see some insight into the process of fabrication and construction of Zaha Hadid’s projects. We’re all used to seeing these amazing images of both proposals and built work; I feel that the fact that some of her projects got built is as amazing as the design itself. Her work is not about materiality, so beyond a few construction joints, the work belies the process of how it was made.

    • dixon

      I had the same thought. I think some of the most interesting material work comes from groups that are paradoxically (and to my mind, counter-productively) not about materiality. As for Lewis’s question, I would guess fiberglas? No seams, cast curves, polished surface, extremely large (so it has to be light for transport).

  • Lewis

    Anyone know what kind of material can construct this kind of free-form object? Corian?

    • http://www.dailygrail.com Red Pill Junkie

      Most likely.

    • Greg

      My experience in these types of shapes/display fixtures has been with carved high-density foam with an applied finish coating about 1/8″ thick then painted. Not only is the end result very lightweight as compared to internal supports of metal and wood, but the exterior finish is extremely durable. Some wood is used at times for supports or connectors internally or base platforms. Typically sculptors are used for the development and manufacturing.

  • Chris

    Wow, a swirly watchyamabob.

  • tung

    How am I suppose to use these things in the middle? I mean, there are flat surfaces as counter top or seats, but more are tilted and curved.

    • Greg

      The majority of merchandise capacity is displayed along the walls on the hangbars. The more highly designed centrr FOCAL displays accept single garments or accessories. Displaying on the surfaces is easily achieved and items change frequently.

  • Osama Aboelezz

    Did they even consider visitors safety with all these sharp lines and hard corners?!

    • Greg

      I am certain that if one looks closely, the edges are slightly radiused and there really are no sharp edges, corners, points, etc. Just softened edges.

  • Gavin

    Oh look, it’s a whacky curve – gotta be Zaha! How much energy and material gets wasted manufacturing these superficial and barely functional designs?

    • AsWicked

      So true.

    • Rich

      I agree, but the people who experience shops like this have no wordly concerns.

  • Linda

    The material might be Hi-Macs.

  • http://www.dailygrail.com Red Pill Junkie

    Call me crazy but I always thought the point of a boutique was to highlight the CLOTHES, not the cashier counter.

    • Greg

      Some fixture displays and especially service counters serve as key and main focal points within retail spaces. Yes, this is a bit extreme and not just for anyone, especially in smaller spaces like boutiques, or shop-in-shops and definitely not based on the costs to achive these works of art.

      Most retailers won’t pay for items like this but based on the simplicity and low costs of the wall displays it may balance out in the end for the planned budget.

  • dUMB

    Leaked reports suggest that they are telepathically assembled from artificial landscapes of neural polystyrene transmitted from a patented process using implants which track the designers REM combined with the sculptural twists and folds of their brains. The resulting organic forms are then half-baked in a Cartesian oven and polished using visual and tactile characteristics.

  • guz

    So, does this shop sell clothes? Or giant deformed tables? Products must’ve been an afterthought for Hadid.

    • Greg

      One of the problems with architectural designers that don’t regularly get involved with retail stores is that they forget about the necessary in-store merchandising to sell, make money and support the cost of the business investment/overhead, and instead create homages to their egos. Not saying this is the case here necessarily, but very typical.

  • hotte

    Sorry, but why did the client ask for these sculptures? They have no use of any kind in this shop. They do not display clothes, they do not serve as counters or changing rooms. They are just objects. Name dropping to get the brand better known? Leaves me bored.

  • John

    She designed a similar sculptural element for the Alchemist boutique in Miami Beach. After about three months, this element was removed after many shattered knee-caps on the part of customers and staff alike. Cool store but clearly her contribution didn’t work out. http://miami.curbed.com/archives/2013/02/08/zaha-

  • Michaela

    I consider myself a fan of Zaha. I absolutely love her unbelievable organic shapes, but you know what? I got tired, so tired of the endless array of Hadidian whipped cream with as much functionality as, well, whipped cream. Although you can eat that.

  • guz

    I think if Zaha Hadid had to open a retail store of her own, it would be selling nothing other than her ego.

  • Claudia

    Just love it. It creates an experience that goes beyond shopping. I wish other mainstream retailers would be a bit bolder.

  • Jelena

    For me, too much.