Autumn Winter 2013 collection
by Craig Green

| 7 comments

Autumn Winter 2013 collection by Craig Green

London designer Craig Green fashioned masks from splintered planks of wood for his Autumn Winter 2013 collection.

Autumn Winter 2013 collection by Craig Green

The planks appear to be arranged haphazardly like a demolished shed and are painted in the same colours as Green's clothes.

Autumn Winter 2013 collection by Craig Green

Each cream, brown, navy and purple outfit in the collection appears to be paired with an evil twin. These shadows wear the same style garments as their colourful partners but completely in black, with faces hidden by bits of timber.

Autumn Winter 2013 collection by Craig Green

Figures not wearing the large headpieces sport beanie hats with thick seams and large roll-ups.

Autumn Winter 2013 collection by Craig Green

Jumpers with subtle patchworks of textures echo the fibres of the wood and faint stripes on items provide tonal variation.

Autumn Winter 2013 collection by Craig Green

Shiny, crinkled materials add further tactility and are worn over matt pieces, with outer garments shorter than those underneath so all the layers can be seen.

Autumn Winter 2013 collection by Craig Green

The backs of tops hang down almost to the knees and look like an additional layer when viewed from the front.

Autumn Winter 2013 collection by Craig Green

Ankle-skimming trousers reveal socks in the same colour as the rest of the outfit, worn with simple black shoes.

Autumn Winter 2013 collection by Craig Green

The collection was first shown during London Collections: Men earlier this year, where Sibling’s Please Kill Me collection of enormous knitted accessories also debuted.

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  • M J

    I like the evil twin concept!

  • geoff

    This is the worst thing I have ever seen in my entire life.

    • Nick Simpson

      In your entire life? Then this must be a terrible time for you Geoff. Dig deep: there’re better times ahead, I promise.

      As for the designs, whether I’m a fan of the clothes or not, I think the masks just distract too much. You could easily see these photos and not remember the clothing whatsoever. Which is surely counter-productive, unless the entire ensemble is purely there to get you to remember the designer’s name?

    • matt

      Anything to back that up?

  • bonsaiman

    The masks are there to distract you from noticing that the clothes are plain nothing.

  • AIRBORNE

    High street fashion has arrived at a level where the supply and diversity is gigantic. In general it is also stylish. With this I want to say that armies of designers have a job in the fashion industry.

    There is a pool of talent at work that creates high quality products. Naturally every season we get a so-called new style which is derived from the creations on the catwalks of the star designers.

    So what is left for designers that want to make a name for themselves (something which is now virtually impossible)? Either to be anti-everything that is out there or create something grotesque that has no relation to fashion. Even better: combine these two. And so we arrive at what can be seen in the pictures above.

  • Kenneth Smythe

    Vacant is not provocative.