Net tables by Benjamin Hubert
for Moroso

| 16 comments
 

Product news: London designer Benjamin Hubert has created a series of tables with legs and tops made of metal mesh for Italian brand Moroso.

Net by Benjamin Hubert for Moroso

Designed by Benjamin Hubert for Moroso, these circular tables have been made by manipulating expanded steel, which is more commonly found on industrial equipment and architecture, to form cylinders and disks for the legs and tops.

Net by Benjamin Hubert for Moroso

"In reference to its industrial origins, Net is purposefully geometric and simple in its design language," explains the designer. "The tables have a large surface with expanded steel perforations that give a feeling of lightness while being small enough to not allow small objects to slip through."

Net by Benjamin Hubert for Moroso

The tables come in a range of powder-coated paint colours and are available in various different sizes.

Net by Benjamin Hubert for Moroso

Net was launched at the Salone Internazionale del Mobile in Milan last month where Benjamin Hubert also unveiled a chair that weighs just three kilograms.

Net by Benjamin Hubert for Moroso

Hubert and Moroso also recently collaborated on a chair with a hammock-like back and a chair that looks like it's wrapped up in a cloak.

Net by Benjamin Hubert for Moroso

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  • mlk

    Something not right about the design. Leg and tabletop connection is too straightforward.

  • Guest

    Nice and simple!

  • carla

    Bah, even children can draw something less banal than this. Nothing special in this design.

  • the whybird

    Nice colours. The last one looks like a cheese grater.

  • blue peter

    My daughter made something similar in school with toilet rolls and red paint.

  • Desk

    Not enough sophistication for an expensive Moroso product. Needs the legs’ meshes to morph into the table top somehow. The mesh should also form a geometric pattern spiralling out from the legs and forming a neat join in the centre.

  • nick
  • Tittly

    Is this just so simple that I'm not getting it?
    Or is it just simple and I should like it for that reason?
    I'm confused with this one.

  • lookin good

    Oh lord, these above comments sound like THEY were made by children.
    “Bah, even children can draw something less banal than this. Nothing special in this design.”, “My daughter made something similar in school with toilet rolls and red paint.” sounds like the first things people said when they saw a Warhol, or a Matisse.

    There is no such thing as too simple.

    These tables are beautiful, simple, and elegant. The cylindrical legs are of a proportion that suggests that the tops could possibly be just sitting on them, creating a tension between the table top and the legs. The ability to see through the tops show the legs through the mesh revealing interesting large circles in the top where the legs meet the underside.

    “The mesh should also form a geometric pattern spiralling out from the legs and forming a neat join in the centre.”

    ugh, gross, you dont get it at all.

    • Damian

      Hubert is the new Warhol/Matisse, you are absolutely right.

      • Readyeddy

        And Karim Rashid once equated himself to Picasso.

  • mirko

    I tried it at Milan Design Week, it doesn’t stand.

  • Lever ever

    Them legs gonna wobble for sure, no structure on that mesh to take lever force applied to legs. Other than that I like the material and the general aesthetic.

  • sarah

    It's not that they are too simple, they just don't look right – the proportions are out of wack and they just come off as looking clumsy and awkward, not elegant. I do like the material though.

  • KELLY

    Kuramata.

  • betarice

    I don’t like designers that use the word “simple”. It’s like white-washed wood from the 90s. Faux style.