Messe Basel New Hall by Herzog & de Meuron
photographed by Hufton + Crow

| 14 comments
 

These new photographs by Hufton + Crow show Herzog & de Meuron's extension to the Messe Basel exhibition centre now that the three new halls are in use (+ slideshow).

Messe Basel New Hall by Herzog & de Meuron photographed by Hufton + Crow

Herzog & de Meuron replaced two of the older halls at the Messe Basel, which hosts Art Basel each June, with an extension that stacks three new ten-metre-high halls on top of one another to create volumes that appear displaced.

Messe Basel New Hall by Herzog & de Meuron photographed by Hufton + Crow

Brushed aluminium clads the exterior of the building and has a textured surface to create the impression of a basket weave.

Messe Basel New Hall by Herzog & de Meuron photographed by Hufton + Crow

Part of the extension bridges across the neighbouring Messeplatz public square to creates a sheltered area with a huge circular skylight.

Messe Basel New Hall by Herzog & de Meuron photographed by Hufton + Crow

Glazing surrounds the space and leads into a ground-floor lobby filled with shops, bars and restaurants.

Messe Basel New Hall by Herzog & de Meuron photographed by Hufton + Crow

The building was completed in February, but only opened to the public in April. Read more about the Messe Basel New Hall in our previous story.

Messe Basel New Hall by Herzog & de Meuron photographed by Hufton + Crow

Since completing the building, Herzog & de Meuron has also started construction of a football stadium in France and an outdoor bathing lake in Riehen.

Messe Basel New Hall by Herzog & de Meuron photographed by Hufton + Crow

The pair were also controversially chosen to design the new National Library of Israel in Jerusalem. See more architecture by Herzog & de Meuron.

Messe Basel New Hall by Herzog & de Meuron photographed by Hufton + Crow

See more photography by Hufton + Crow on Dezeen, or on the photographers' website.

Messe Basel New Hall by Herzog & de Meuron photographed by Hufton + Crow

  • mmmhhh

    This is just wonderful. Out of curiosity, I’m wondering what’s the cost per square metre of this façade, if anyone knows.

  • http://atelier-artisanal.fr fidi.nirina

    These are not photographs but visualisations.

    • http://www.hanif-revano.com hanif revano

      It’s a photograph. I also thought originally that it was a rendering, but it’s not! That’s how wonderful the building is.

  • http://www.shifta.fr shiftA

    Those photographs really look like render perspectives.

  • leohanwoori

    Omigod, all the while I thought I was looking at renderings! They must have taken great effort in hiring so many “visitors” for the photoshoot. Nonetheless, simple yet elegantly executed. Especially love the bulging facade!

  • papou

    Qu’on aime ou qu’on aime pas, il y a de la maestria.

  • rem

    After renderings that try to look like pictures, here are pictures that try to look like renderings… not sure how I feel about it, but nicely executed.

  • zizi

    Remarkable craftsmanship on the execution of the surface. Boring volumes and spaces though.

  • ferriss

    So if a photographer does their job properly, gets to be in exactly the right place at exactly the right time to capture a compelling version of what is actually happening, they are automatically assumed to be computer generated photos?

    There’s something backwards about that assumption.

    Rendering packages have strived for years to be more photorealistic. The time of day, the lens, the contrast, the clouds, the people are all manipulable and infinitely controllable to whatever outcome is desired. Photographers do not have that luxury of choice or control over these variables. Admittedly, the digital tools now available to photographers have provided the opportunity to tweak the final results. But those tools cannot replace the fundamental skill to be in the right spot at the right time.

    When you see well executed photographs, perhaps you should be thinking that the rendering packages still have a way to go, rather than the reverse? There is an endless supply of baanal images floating around these days, including several of this project currently running in a prominent design journal. They certainly don’t look like renderings. Then again, they don’t much look like the building either.

  • Adrian

    Haha. That’s so funny. Are they really trying to prove that it’s a nice and bright public space underneath the building? Really, try going there and check how friendly the space is.

    Even more ridiculous is that nobody is showing a photo of how the building “fits” in the axis of Clarastrasse.

  • Herv'

    Like a big donut!

    • studio

      Duncan, is that you?

  • Allan

    You hardly ever see people on architecture photographs. Only on renders.

  • Dramis

    This building / these images are a great example of architectural design’s uncanny valley. I was completely baffled by the nature of these images.