3D-printed perfume tools
by Unfold and Barnabé Fillion

| 4 comments
 

Belgian design studio Unfold has created a set of 3D-printed ceramic tools for diluting and diffusing the scents of French perfumer Barnabé Fillion (+ slideshow).

The Peddler by The Peddler by Unfold and Barnabé FillionUnfold and Barnabé Fillion
Photography by Marie Taillefer

Using a ceramic 3D-printing technique the studio originally developed in 2009, Unfold produced a series of objects to dilute the perfume plus a diffuser that absorbs the liquid and dissipates the scent.

The Peddler by Unfold and Barnabé Fillion
Photography by Marie Taillefer

"The whole setup is an olfactory installation that explores the extraordinary way in which ceramics absorb, store and release a perfume's head, heart and base notes over a prolonged time," Dries Verbruggen of Unfold told Dezeen.

The Peddler by Unfold and Barnabé Fillion
Photography by Marie Taillefer

The printed tools include a carafe that holds distilled water, a smaller receptacle for alcohol and a high-necked flask, pipette and funnel used to dilute and mix the perfume.

The Peddler by Unfold and Barnabé Fillion
Photography by Unfold

Diluted perfume is then poured into the central core of an unglazed diffuser and gradually spreads through the multiple compartments, which create a greater surface area to absorb the liquid.

The Peddler by Unfold and Barnabé Fillion
Photography by Marie Taillefer

"The inspiration here was taken from fruit cut-throughs," said Verbruggen. "When you cut through a lemon for example, you release its essence in the atmosphere but you also expose the intricate inner structure of the fruit."

The Peddler by Unfold and Barnabé Fillion
Photography by Marie Taillefer

Although the diffuser will naturally release the perfume's scent over time, the designers created an apparatus that spreads it around, "to give it an extra punch and to add a conscious gesture."

The Peddler by Unfold and Barnabé Fillion
Photography by Unfold

Any of three different diffusers can be attached to an oak and aluminium contraption and are counterbalanced by a weight. Turning a handle causes the diffuser to rotate, releasing the scent as it spins.

The Peddler by Unfold and Barnabé Fillion
Photography by Unfold

The items are printed from fine layers of ceramic that produce a stratified surface. "The technique is very suited for intricate and complex ceramic shapes like the diffusers," Verbruggen explained. The vessels have a layer thickness of one millimetre that results in a rough surface, while the more precise diffusers are formed from 0.5 millimetre-thick layers.

The Peddler by Unfold and Barnabé Fillion
Photography by Unfold

Unfold created the installation for the launch of Barnabé Fillion's perfume brand, which is called The Peddler and focuses on the experience of scent through temporary events and exhibitions. Their machine was one of several collaborations Fillion undertook with artists and designers, and he presented the results at Maison & Objet in September.

  • pickname

    Please stop using “3D printed” as an attribute to describe a product. It is just a way of making an object. To me that sounds like a circular sawn chair… 3D printing alone is not enough to justify a design, at least not any more.

    • paul m

      I touch-screen typed this and agree with you.

    • M0ME

      Absolutely hate it! Everything is made by 3D, it feels like doesn’t have any story or vision to it!

  • greggT

    These are great prototyping tools, but it’s just making toys, jewellery and sub-standard clothing! And prosthetics and medical devices are ALREADY custom made, with significantly higher quality under sterile conditions.

    Imagine if everyone had a loom at home — cheap technology that anyone can understand. Would people run out to buy them because they want a blanket of a specific size or color or material? No, they just shop until they find a blanket they like b/c anything else is a waste of their time and resources. No one is going to keep a stock of materials at home, just in case they need to build something.

    Making a device that can copy itself is just a stupid device. Making a device that can FIX another copy of itself is the next step in robot evolution, even if the robot completely disassembled the other device, tested each component to replace the bad ones, and built it again from the parts. A small step.