JACQUES HERZOG: THE PÉREZ ART
MUSEUM "IS A NAKED STRUCTURE"

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Dezeen and MINI World Tour: Jacques Herzog of Herzog & de Meuron explains how the Pérez Art Museum Miami was designed so that everything is visible and there is no strict barrier between inside and outside, in our second movie from Miami.

Pérez Art Museum by Herzog & de Meuron
Pérez Art Museum facade - photograph by Iwan Baan

"The building is a naked structure; everything you see is at the same time carrying, so structural, and space-making, so spaces defining and containing," Herzog tells Dezeen.

"There is no inside/outside, there is nothing that is masked, so everything you get is doing all you expect from architecture. In that sense it's a very honest or very archaic architecture."

Pérez Art Museum by Herzog & de Meuron
Veranda - photograph by Iwan Baan

Herzog & de Meuron's Pérez Art Museum Miami opened to the public last week in downtown Miami and accommodates 3000 square-metres of galleries within a three-storey complex with a huge elevated veranda.

A car park is on show beneath the building, while a single roof shelters both indoor and outdoor spaces.

Pérez Art Museum by Herzog & de Meuron
View from the veranda. Copyright Dezeen.

"Typologically you could say that this is a building built on stilts," says the architect. "Layers end with a trellis-like roof and start with a platform which is also kind of a trellis, under which you can park your car and that also is open to the elements. Literally everything is visible, is part of the whole."

Pérez Art Museum by Herzog & de Meuron
Exhibition galleries - photograph by Iwan Baan

The architect describes how galleries were designed to open out to the veranda so that "landscape would walk inside the building".

"We wanted to do buildings that are transparent or permeable, so that inside/outside would not be a strict barrier," he explains.

Pérez Art Museum by Herzog & de Meuron
Exhibition galleries - photograph by Iwan Baan

Exhibition galleries occupy the two lower floors of the museum and were organised to encourage a fluid transition between spaces.

"The special concept of the museum is this kind of sequence of spaces, which are more fluid," says Herzog. "It's a new kind of museum typology, which we believe was right to do here."

Pérez Art Museum by Herzog & de Meuron
Auditorium staircase. Copyright Dezeen.

The building also features an auditorium that doubles up as a connecting staircase.

Pérez Art Museum by Herzog & de Meuron
Auditorium staircase. Copyright Dezeen.

"The auditorium staircase is an attempt to do more than just an auditorium - that would be a space that is closed and only used when there is a performance or conference - but to introduce it so that you have a grand stair leading people up to the main gallery floor," says the architect.

He continues: "By means of curtains it can be subdivided, so it gives more opportunities to the curators and directors, and the people here."

Pérez Art Museum by Herzog & de Meuron
Jacques Herzog and Dezeen's Marcus Fairs in a bay window. Copyright: Dezeen

Bay windows puncture the walls of the first-floor galleries and contain benches that visitors can use to take a break from exhibitions.

"This is to give the windows more than just the role of being a hole in the facade," adds Herzog. "This again is a transitional element between inside and outside, inviting people to rest, sit and warm up a little bit."

Jacques Herzog of Herzog & de Meuron
Jacques Herzog. Copyright: Dezeen

We drove around Miami in our MINI Cooper S Paceman. The music in the movie is a track called Jewels by Zequals. You can listen to the full track on Dezeen Music Project.

Our MINI Paceman in Miami
Our MINI Paceman in Miami