Studio Makkink & Bey create furniture
for a nomadic living room

| 6 comments
 

Dutch firm Studio Makkink & Bey has created a collection of furniture for a nomadic future including a backpack that becomes a sofa bed, a carrycot that becomes a table and a walking cane that turns into an illuminated screen (+ slideshow).

Studio Makkink & Bey create furniture for a nomadic living room

Conceptroom Huisraad by Makkink & Bey is a range of objects that examines the concept of domestic interiors that are no longer attached to any one physical space.

Studio Makkink & Bey create furniture for a nomadic living room

The items form part of Living Spaces, an exhibition exploring textiles in Dutch interiors at the TextielMuseum in Tilburg, the Netherlands. The pieces "depict a future scenario in which the individual travels light and stays comfortable," said the team.

Studio Makkink & Bey create furniture for a nomadic living room

As part of the display, Makkink & Bey created three objects that utilise natural materials and animal fibres combined with multiple uses.

Studio Makkink & Bey create furniture for a nomadic living room

WarmteWeefsels, meaning "heat tissues", is a carrycot that turns into a table. In its former state, the cot comes with a pair of adjustable handles and blanket.

Studio Makkink & Bey create furniture for a nomadic living room

To convert it into a table, users remove the blanket, slide the handles to their widest setting and flip the whole thing upside down. The blanket can then be used as either a rug or table cloth.

Studio Makkink & Bey create furniture for a nomadic living room

VouwPlaats, or "fold place", is a knitted mattress and chair you can carry around as you would a backpack.

Studio Makkink & Bey create furniture for a nomadic living room

The user wears a woollen jacket attached to the frame to carry the VouwPlaats around.

Studio Makkink & Bey create furniture for a nomadic living room

By placing it on the floor, the rolled up mattress acts as a seat and the frame acts as a backrest.

Studio Makkink & Bey create furniture for a nomadic living room

To convert the piece into a bed, the user simply unclasps the two straps holding it together and rolls out the mattress.

Studio Makkink & Bey create furniture for a nomadic living room

The VensterLicht, or "window light", is a portable room divider and a cane. When closed, the VensterLicht is a chunky walking stick. Inside however, is a four-legged stand and strip-light with a piece of silk cloth attached. When unravelled, it creates a full-length screen.

Studio Makkink & Bey create furniture for a nomadic living room

Each piece provides individuals with, "expandable, foldable and lightweight furniture to travel with, as they traverse boundless interiors – our shrinking world," said the designers.

Studio Makkink & Bey create furniture for a nomadic living room

This isn’t the first time Studio Makkink & Bey has created multifunctional furniture; last year they created SideSeat, a mash-up of a desk, shelves and swivel chair in one.

Studio Makkink & Bey create furniture for a nomadic living room

Living Spaces continues at the TextielMuseum until 11 May.

Photography is by Tommy de Lange, commissioned by the TextielMuseum.

  • havint

    What’s the point with this product? Nomadic product to be used in a Settled space? Stop making me laugh!

    And the photos, please are so freaking!

  • odnen

    You know you are part of the design bubble when you design furniture for the sole purpose to photograph it nicely and get published or exhibited.

  • jhminnyc

    Actually, I love this stupidity.

    First, that Warmte Weefsels is a cot. It’s a blanket or a rug. A cot implies a modicum of comfort. This, in fact, implies a maximum of misery laying on a thin blanket on a hard floor. Or is the extension cord weaving shown on the floor supposed to make a comfy under support? And where did the cord come from? I don’t know about you, but lying on an open weave extension cord doesn’t seem too dreamy to me. However, if you have been walking all day while barefoot, as shown in the photo, I suppose you can sleep anywhere. Also, just think if you used it as a tablecloth, as they suggest, on the fantastic table that the basket makes, and while eating your meal, your guest, the sheep, accidentally spills his wine all over the cloth. Where do you sleep now? On a wine soaked rug? I don’t think so, no matter how much your feet hurt.

    Next, consider VouwPlatts. I think I would personally vow not to open the door if I saw a barefoot (in this millennium designers seem not to have shoes in The Netherlands) guest of mine coming up my sidewalk with this strapped to them. Imagine that it’s summer and they have to wear this heavy, quilted woollen coat just to come over for a visit. In this outfit you know they would be all out of sorts from being overheated, and annoyed because I don’t have a bed, sofa, chair or even a coat rack to offer them while they visit. I suspect our friendship would be short lived. Maybe that’s why they have to be nomadic.

    Finally, we have to consider the barefoot man and his walking cane. I hate to keep coming back to the foot problem, but apparently it’s essential to their entire design concept. However, don’t you think he wouldn’t need the cane if he got some shoes or sandals? In the National Geographic programs I’ve seen most nomads at least wear sandals. Whatever. As these designers “traverse our boundless interiors – our shrinking world”, going from office presentation to office presentation on blistered, calloused and swollen feet, they sometimes have epiphanies. One such inspiration produced this cane to ease their pain and provide a projection screen for ill equipped offices. What could be more essential in today’s world?

    I’m so thankful for these designs. They made my day.

  • Alicja

    Couldn’t agree more.

  • beatirce

    Why does Dutch design always have beautiful photography with beautiful people?

    Makes me suspicious.

    I bet if we just had normal studio shots we would see the design better.

  • Businessgypsy

    Hey! Let’s design some ‘nomadic’ furniture from materials that have minimal resistance to wear and weather. Consult experienced trekkers? What do they know about beauty?