3D-printed shoes by Recreus
scrunch up to fit into pockets

| 14 comments
 

These shoes are 3D-printed using flexible, durable filament so they can be folded up and stuffed into a pocket or bag (+ slideshow).

3D-printed shoes by Recreus scrunch up to fit into pockets

Designed by Ignacio Garcia of Spanish 3D-printing firm Recreus, the Sneakerbot II shoes are printed with the company's Filaflex 1.75-millimetre filament, which comes in a range of metallic colours and matte hues.

3D-printed shoes by Recreus scrunch up to fit into pockets

This elastic filament forms a rubbery, waterproof material that is bendy and retains its shape after being scrunched up.

3D-printed shoes by Recreus scrunch up to fit into pockets

The shoes can be printed on a MakerBot using a custom extruder also designed by Garcia, which prevents the elastic filament becoming tangled during the process.

3D-printed shoes by Recreus scrunch up to fit into pockets

Sole and upper are printed in one piece, then the tongue is attached to the front of the shoe. Holes for threading the laces through are incorporated into the print file.

3D-printed shoes by Recreus scrunch up to fit into pockets

Chunky faceted forms around the bases of the high-top trainers create a Futurist appearance.

3D-printed shoes by Recreus scrunch up to fit into pockets

This design builds on the original Sneakerbot model, which has smoother surfaces that look more like running shoes.

3D-printed shoes by Recreus scrunch up to fit into pockets

The files for both designs are available to download for free from MakerBot's Thingiverse website.

3D-printed shoes by Recreus scrunch up to fit into pockets

Others experimenting with 3D-printed footwear include fashion designer Iris van Herpen and sports brand Nike, which have both used the technology to create shoes. Also, 3D-printing company Cubify has launched a range of women's shoes that can be printed overnight at home.

  • Ivan

    Pencil holder is way more innovative :)

  • http://upthetree.com/ FuntimeBen

    While I’m all for the future, I fear a future of people with shoes that are synthetic and aren’t perforated to release moisture. It is going to be a stinky future.

    • AdamBergkvist

      Omg. It’s 1.0. Relax, they will figure that out.

  • Charlie

    Hmmm. Pants.

  • Anastasia

    A glorified version of Crocs?

  • beatrice

    Why are they faceted if they are made from a flexible rubber?

    This is the year 2014. Stylistic facets were going on back in the 90s. They are unnecessary for this design.

  • Tanuki

    Can we discuss a blanket ban on 3D printing articles?

  • T,.T

    Is he walking backward?!

  • Stophorus

    A moratorium would be enough, but very necessary in my opinion.

  • Dre

    Why would you want to put your shoes in your pocket? What if you step in dog poo?

  • Scornballs

    Phew, they really dodged a bullet on the aesthetics there. I was afraid a 3D-printed show might look a complete arse.

  • Trish

    Two questions: why would one want “futuristic” shoes? I know next year is the future according to back to the future but… Why do I want to put shoes that have been walking all over the place in my pocket?

  • John

    Waterproof shoes? Made from one piece of material? Which roll up really small? Are they not called moccasins and do we not already have them?

  • KWoei

    I’m quite surprised by all the negative comments readers put on 3D-printed fashion. Sure maybe they are not a 100% practical to your consumerist needs, but innovators like this are helping shape what is possible in the future.

    He along with other 3D fashion designers are showing you what is possible, that we are getting closer and closer to the average consumer being able to just simply press print and have a shoe without leaving the comfort of your home or waiting for the postman to deliver your product.

    It gives you the choice that you don’t need to rely on mass production, factories in China or sweatshops to make your shoes.

    The fact that he released his design for free on Thingiverse gives users not only the option to print the shoe design if they like it as it is, but allows another innovator or designer to work of the base digital file to improve the design.

    Regarding the breathability of the shoe that can be easily overcome by adding perforations into the membrane. Obviously we can not get there without experimentations.

    And the ability to scrunch it up to a pocket size is merely illustration how flexible this material is which differs from a lot of other standard printing filaments you can get currently.

    Innovators and designers like Ignacio are not necessary selling you the design, they are sharing with you the idea and the means to do it. And perhaps you can improve on it and help advance it’s progress along the way.