Kohki Hiranuma plans "world's first seamless
glass structure" for Venice Biennale

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Glastecture Venice biennale installation by Kohki Hiranuma

Venice Architecture Biennale 2014: Japanese architect Kohki Hiranuma plans to create a shell-like structure of "seamless glass" to curve around visitors at the Venice Architecture Biennale this summer.

Glastecture Venice biennale installation by Kohki Hiranuma

Proposed for the entrance courtyard of the 18th century Palazzo Mora, the Glastecture installation is conceived by Kohki Hiranuma as a load-bearing structure built from nothing but bent glass. This will create a looping form that seems to have no joints, but will actually be held together with resin.

Glastecture Venice biennale installation by Kohki Hiranuma

According to the Hiranuma, the glass enclosure will appear to change shape as it reflects sunlight across the day, and will offer visitors a chance to experience the garden and surrounding city with a "new sense of distance".

Glastecture Venice biennale installation by Kohki Hiranuma

The architect said his vision was to create "spaces more close to the nature" so that "environmental changes through the days bring richness in time".

Glastecture Venice biennale installation by Kohki Hiranuma
Plan - click for larger image

Glastecture will form part of the collateral event Time Space Existence, which will take place within the spaces of two palazzos and show the work of architects from six different continents.

Glastecture Venice biennale installation by Kohki Hiranuma
Elevation - click for larger image

It will be located at Palazzo Mora, Cannaregio, 3659.

  • Guy

    Maybe stating the obvious, but it’s going to get HOT in there in Venice in summer.

  • bwd

    Super! They really must include a solar oven, or at least an ant roaster.

  • Meija

    “This will create a looping form that seems to have no joints, but will actually be held together with resin”… err seams?

  • andrazzh

    This is just technology for the sake of technology, not the real point of architecture. But it would still be interesting if they manage to build it right.