Janne Kyttanen 3D-prints essential travel items
with Lost Luggage kit

| 7 comments
 

3D-printing guru Janne Kyttanen has designed a kit of clothes and accessories that can be printed in one go from a single computer file, removing the need for travellers to pack a bag for their holiday (+ slideshow).

"We already have 3D printers in hotels and airports," said Janne Kyttanen, creative director for American company 3D Systems, who believes these machines could be utilised to produce luggage on demand.

Lost Luggage by Janne Kytannen

His Lost Luggage kit combines 3D-print files for bags, clothes and accessories that "represent an entire outfit from head to toe", which can be downloaded and reproduced at any location.

Lost Luggage by Janne Kytannen

Kyttanen suggests that tourists could potentially travel without baggage and simply print off the items needed for their trip at the destination.

Lost Luggage by Janne Kytannen

"Send your luggage in an email, travel the world unencumbered and arrive at your destination to find your luggage waiting for you," he said.

Lost Luggage by Janne Kytannen

The set includes a version of the Le69 Handbag by fashion brand Paco Rabanne and a dress that can be worn in four different ways.

Lost Luggage by Janne Kytannen

It also contains a pair of platform shoes, a cuff bracelet, driving gloves, a pair of sunglasses, a digital watch and a knuckleduster.

Lost Luggage by Janne Kytannen
The Lost Luggage kit formed part of an exhibition of work by Kyttanen

The garments are made from sections of material that is woven from strands of flexible plastic filament.

Lost Luggage by Janne Kytannen
Kyttanen's self-titled exhibition explored the future of 3D printing

All of these pieces are printed in one operation as folded items contained within a large shoulder bag.

Lost Luggage by Janne Kytannen
The exhibition took place at Galerie VIVID in Rotterdam

The project formed part of an exhibition of work by Kyttanen that explores the future of 3D printing, which included 3D-printed "selfies" and ping-pong bats.

Kyttanen's self-titled exhibition took place at Galerie VIVID in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, from 2 March to 20 April 2014.

  • greenish

    “It also contains a pair of platform shoes, a cuff bracelet, driving gloves, a pair of sunglasses, a digital watch and a knuckleduster.”

    All the essentials then. Nevermind toothpaste or spare pants, god forbid I should ever arrive anywhere and not have my driving gloves and knuckleduster.

  • greenish

    “It also contains a pair of platform shoes, a cuff bracelet, driving gloves, a pair of sunglasses, a digital watch and a knuckleduster.”

    All the essentials then. Nevermind toothpaste or spare pants, god forbid I should ever arrive anywhere and not have my driving gloves and knuckleduster.

  • lookatme

    I think this is great.

    Kyttanen is exploring a world that many often reject; a world where we are asked to understand/embrace the construction of a product by using this revolutionary means of manufacturing to create it. Owning a 3D printer, I can assure you that watching a print is an enlightening experience, that excites the mind with endless possibilities.

    These people/designers that are embracing this technology are often snarled at by the design community for reasons I can’t understand. Like most of the products on this site, the intent is to make you think. Perhaps the 3D printing “craze” is over reported (not in my opinion) but it is interesting to me how quickly people will neglect the most fascinating part of 3D printing: that these products are made from almost nothing; that there is nearly zero waste; no shipping trucks or sweatshops, and if you care to put some thought into it, the designs are completely open to re-iterations, customisations and improvements.

    Yay 3D printing! ;)

    • Norbert Geelen

      Why not just show the fascinating possibilities of 3D printing/manufacturing without the ridiculous “concept” behind it?

      • lookatme

        I think it’s only “ridiculous” because the designer is asking you to abandon the reality you know. This concept is out there, sure, but I think it needs to be. 3D printing is in it’s infancy and like all new tech, it’s important to question the barriers of what’s possible with it. Sure this is not as practical (for now) as printing out houses -

        http://www.dezeen.com/2014/04/24/chinese-company-3d-prints-buildings-construction-waste/

        But I think it is ok to play with these ideas, like they are toys. Imagine streamlined planes with no storage compartments, cheaper flights, no baggage claim or little cars driving all day to move bags from here to there. Imagine leaving a hotel with the piece of mind that you have everything you need, while you toss all your used items into the recycling chute, and they are ground up, melted, and extruded into the printers for the next guest.

        Its not going to be a reality anytime soon, but this (apparently working) concept is a preview to that future.

  • katherinebeatrice

    The concept is interesting– emailing luggage, traveling unencumbered, bringing the consumer closer to production. My concern is about waste. If you print your luggage every time you travel, do you just ditch it before you go on the plane? Is it printed out of consumables? Then you could just eat your luggage and then not have to worry about eating before your flight either. To me, this only seems a good solution for lost luggage.

    I appreciate what 3D printing makes possible, but just because something is possible doesn’t make it a good idea. I love brainstorming and concepts but there are some good reasons not every concept should be a reality.

  • Peter

    If you want to travel without luggage/things, it seems less complicated (at least for now) to buy some upon your arrival.