Studioilse designs home for fictitious couple
using Vitra and Artek furniture

| 2 comments
 

The loft space at the VitraHaus showroom in Weil am Rhein, Germany, has been transformed into a fictitious home by London-based Studioilse using furniture by Vitra and Artek  (+ slideshow).

Studioilse VitraHaus loft with Vitra and Artek furniture

Studioilse, led by designer Ilse Crawford, curated the installation at Swiss firm Vitra's Herzog & de Meuron-designed showroom – the first joint showcase since the brand acquired Finnish company Artek in September last year.

Studioilse VitraHaus loft with Vitra and Artek furniture

"The VitraHaus loft was going to be redone for the fourth time and I felt that this would be a fantastic opportunity to display Artek as a natural addition to the Vitra project," said Nora Fehlbaum, a member of Vitra's board of directors.

Studioilse VitraHaus loft with Vitra and Artek furniture

The loft has been arranged as the home of imaginary Finnish-German couple Harri and Astrid – a musician and set designer whose apartment is "filled with objects that tell the story of their lives".

Studioilse VitraHaus loft with Vitra and Artek furniture

Studioilse wanted to present the furniture as part of a lived-in environment rather than in a traditional showroom.

Studioilse VitraHaus loft with Vitra and Artek furniture

"We wanted to think beyond the furniture and lighting and beyond the bland commercialisation of design, to convey real life in all its layers and eccentricities," said Crawford.

Studioilse VitraHaus loft with Vitra and Artek furniture

On display are famous designs like Stool 60 and Paimio Armchair 41 by Modernist architect Alvar Aalto, who co-founded Artek in 1935.

Studioilse VitraHaus loft with Vitra and Artek furniture

The space is cluttered with books and ornaments, while photographs and colour samples are pinned to a cork-lined wall.

Studioilse VitraHaus loft with Vitra and Artek furniture

Canvases, brushes and other artist's materials are grouped into a studio setup in one part of the loft, which has wooden floors throughout and is naturally lit by the building's large gable windows.

Studioilse VitraHaus loft with Vitra and Artek furniture

"It was vital to bring out the intellectual spirit of the minds and hands that made these things," said Crawford. "These pieces are stories of real life and courageous intentions to raise the quality of everyday living. To see them as museum exhibits or sales units is a profound injustice to their creators."

Studioilse VitraHaus loft with Vitra and Artek furniture

Earlier this year, Artek bought the factory in Finland where Aalto developed his furniture.

  • Douglas Montgomery

    It is nicely done, as you might expect from Studioisle. But the scenario is all too Woody Allen for me.

    If the studio really want to do justice to the designer’s aspirations for their objects, you’d do worse than make the imaginary inhabitants a nurse and a bricklayer. It would make a change if nothing else to celebrate users with more modest professions, or at least an absence of the usual middle-class pretensions.

  • EM-K | Rethink Design Studio

    We appreciate the concept of displaying a new furniture line in something other than the stark “showroom” type spread. The space looks lived in and the end result is beautiful.