Yerin Do adds leather "parasites"
to wooden furniture

| 4 comments
 

Graduate designer Yerin Do presented leather clothes hooks that slot into wooden surfaces to make them look like they're infested with fungi at the Royal College of Art degree show, which opened last week (+ slideshow).

Parasite Hooks by Yerin Do

For her Parasite Hooks project, Do drilled angled holes into the wooden surfaces of a wardrobe and an armchair.

Parasite Hooks by Yerin Do

Leather offcuts were snipped into diamond shapes and rolled into cones, then inserted into the holes.

Parasite Hooks by Yerin Do



She described the process as "like planting" and told Dezeen that the project references the natural world. "Mushroom and moss grow on the trunks of trees, mussels growing on sea rocks – I am fascinated by these creatures that use the surface of another being as their base," said Do. "They change its appearance and characteristic entirely."

Parasite Hooks by Yerin Do

"I wanted to mimic this natural phenomenon on a common interior material - wood," she added. "By using leather in various thicknesses and sizes, I am able to create unusual yet somehow familiar patterns and texture on any wooden surface."

Parasite Hooks by Yerin Do

Although described by the designer as "parasite" hooks, the leather pieces add functionality to the items they are attached to.

Parasite Hooks by Yerin Do

"The leather parasites benefit their hosts by adding a hook function for hanging clothing and accessories," said Do.

Parasite Hooks by Yerin Do

The leather pieces can also be attached to walls, columns and doors to utilise them for storage.

Parasite Hooks by Yerin Do

Do completed the project while studying on the MA Design Products course at the Royal College of Art in London.

Parasite Hooks by Yerin Do

Her designs are on display at Show RCA 2014, the institution's annual graduate showcase, until 29 June.

Parasite Hooks by Yerin Do

Other projects exhibited include a loom that can weave in three dimensions, and a flexible and reusable packaging system for valuable goods. See more projects from Show RCA 2014 »

  • mitate

    I bet the cabinetmaker who built that wardrobe would be absolutely thrilled to see how it has been improved.

  • stories

    Just terrible.

  • Dylan

    Personally, I have seen so much decent furniture go to the dogs and scrapped, unloved, abused, or even burnt that I think it’s a good thing that this is used as the designer clearly loves it.

    I gingerly like it partly for being different, yet it also looks scaled. My only question is whether the leather strong enough for a heavy load?

  • mrswoo

    I saw it today. Strangely aggressive looking and all those little pinched bits of leather are an absolute dust trap.