Faceted concrete corridor welcomes children
to Taller Básico de Arquitectura's nursery

| 13 comments
 

Children attending this nursery in Spain by Pamplona studio Taller Básico de Arquitectura enter through an angular concrete corridor carved out of the building's faceted shell (+ slideshow).

Nursery School in Haro by Taller Básico de Arquitectura

The building's location on a steeply sloping site outside the town of Haro led architects Javier Pérez-Herreras and Javier Quintana de Uña of Taller Básico de Arquitectura to base their design on a geological formation, emerging from the hillside.

Nursery School in Haro by Taller Básico de Arquitectura



"We conceive an architecture dictated by crystallographic laws," said the architects, adding that the suburban milieu of roads and infrastructure influenced the monumental design.

Nursery School in Haro by Taller Básico de Arquitectura

"The daycare centre is conceived as a great rock, a visible structure for that building-less city," they said.

Nursery School in Haro by Taller Básico de Arquitectura

The building's lower level, housing maintenance and service facilities, is largely enclosed in a monolithic slab that rises from the landscape above a nearby road.

Nursery School in Haro by Taller Básico de Arquitectura

Perched on top of the hill with views towards the town, the upper storey features planar surfaces intended to resemble the sharp edges of a fragmented rock.

Nursery School in Haro by Taller Básico de Arquitectura

The angular forms create overhangs and openings that shelter windows and entrances, while a passageway with bare concrete walls and a sloping ceiling leads to the glazed main entrance.

Nursery School in Haro by Taller Básico de Arquitectura
Site plan - click for larger image

The entrance connects to large hall, around which classrooms, offices, a cafeteria and a multipurpose space are arranged.

Nursery School in Haro by Taller Básico de Arquitectura
Floor plan - click for larger image

Full-height glazing ensures these spaces are filled with natural light that is reflected by the white walls and light-coloured floors.

Nursery School in Haro by Taller Básico de Arquitectura
Cross section - click for larger image

The classrooms are positioned on either side of the central hall and feature doors integrated into the glazed walls, which open onto external terraces.

Nursery School in Haro by Taller Básico de Arquitectura
Long section - click for larger image

Photography is by Pedro Pegenaute.

  • Stuart

    (Architect’s perspective) – “what lovely visible board-marked shuttering, very nice indeed”.

    (Child’s perspective) – “mommy hold my hand tighter, had I known we were going to visit the bear’s cave today, I’d have brought my flashlight”.

  • Nick

    I hope the children love the space. It’s beautiful and certainly doesn’t patronise the inhabitants as many places can do. The absence of colour does seem odd given it’s importance in the children’s early years. Maybe it doesn’t matter or they’ll all need therapy when they hit 16.

  • spadestick

    Seriously now… where is the colour? This looks depressing.

  • james

    Horrible place for kids. Doesn’t look like the architects did any research on what young kids want and need for their development, such a shame.

  • Derrick Riley

    This nursery was obviously designed to train children for vigilante justice. Just don’t walk on the grass. http://www.bioshale.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/aeon-flux-grass-h1n-net.jpg

  • Kalum

    This shows an empty space (canvas) without any furniture.

    I am sure the colours will come later.

    Is that so wrong to leave to the teachers and children to appropriate the place instead of splashing it pre-emptively with flashy cladding?

    • mike

      Good point.

  • Patsy

    This must be the least welcoming entrance I’ve ever seen. Why are we architects so obsessed with designing for ourselves? This is a beautiful building, but I’m not sure that it is entirely appropriate for an environment that is supposed to nurture small children.

  • rpasea

    Nice art gallery… what, it’s a nursery? Yikes. Horrible.

  • Jordan

    The parents would be happy to know their child will be independent when they grow up if they’re willing to walk that entrance alone.

  • Rae Claire

    On a hot day it might feel refreshing. I like the idea of kids and staff decorating the place – hope that’s permitted. Otherwise reminds me of 1984 (the book).

  • Nether

    Where’s the visual and spacial stimuli for these children? Even for a sanatorium this would be depressing, let alone a nursery! When architects are more concerned about getting their work into magazines rather then attending to what is required of the building this is what you get – a life size sculpture. It is impossible to consider this good architecture if it fails to address a fundamental objective: purpose. This building could be many things but not a nursery.

  • Oliver

    This harsh building seems to be built more for raising the ego of the architects than for improving the environment of the children.