London house extension by Cousins and Cousins
has a window wrapping its corner

| 8 comments

A large window wraps around one corner of this brickwork extension to a Victorian house in London by local office Cousins and Cousins (+ slideshow).

London house extension by Cousins and Cousins

Cousins and Cousins designed the two-storey extension for a family of six who had outgrown their four bedroom home in Hackney, east London.



The house, named Vegetarian Cottage, is thought to stand on the site of the London branch of the Vegetarian Society founded in the mid 19th century.

London house extension by Cousins and Cousins

The brick-built extension provides a glass-fronted dining room and extra bedroom for the residence – the first boasts the new modern window, while the second features more traditional fenestration.

London house extension by Cousins and Cousins

The architects made use of reclaimed brickwork from the former living room wall to help the old and new structures to blend together, while windows and frames originally in an upper floor bathroom were relocated to the new bedroom.

London house extension by Cousins and Cousins

"The clients were keen for the extension to blend into the existing building," the architects told Dezeen.

"We felt that by re-using materials from the demolition works not only would it be a cost-effective and environmentally friendly proposition, but would embellish the new extension with some of the character of the existing house to strengthen the impression that the new and old elements have always existed together."

London house extension by Cousins and Cousins

A section of the brickwork was removed from the corner of the dining room extension to incorporate the large corner window, which is subtly framed with slim black metal surrounds.

London house extension by Cousins and Cousins

This window becomes the focal point for the extension, aiming to create a stronger connection between the interior and exterior spaces.

A glass sliding door, with a pale wooden frame and a curved metal pull handle, leads out into the garden.

London house extension by Cousins and Cousins

Inside, the architects reconfigured the ground floor of the existing house, combining the kitchen with the new dining room to create an L-shaped living area.

London house extension by Cousins and Cousins

The dining room is floored in the same pale timber as the door frame, and has a single white column positioned in the corner to support the floor of the bedroom above.

Photography is by Jack Hobhouse.

London house extension by Cousins and Cousins
Ground floor plan – click for larger image
London house extension by Cousins and Cousins
First floor plan – click for larger image
London house extension by Cousins and Cousins
Section – click for larger image
  • This window is so disconnected!

    Inside, the view is lovely. However, you can see why dark frames and structure are preferred near large windows, thanks to reflection.

    I’m sure this was very expensive to achieve, and this was the best solution given the budget. The detail work in getting this to match the home is what bothers me. You’re losing the corner, either way, so save some money, and use a square black column behind the glass. Then have the courage to minimally frame the window to match on the exterior.

    • rUIPEDRo

      The first thing that pops out is that the window is way big from the fixed side but, once we saw the first
      picture from inside, looking into the garden, looks really good.

      It might be expensive but, that column really works and the one you’re saying they could do (the square), won’t work as good as this one. I’m sure you agree with me on this point, just as I agree with you that the square one would be cheaper and an option…

      • I’m just so puzzled from the outside. I’m glad it works from the interior.

  • omikey

    No, it’s perfect.

  • I agree, looking from inside, the view is awesome. I don’t like how it looks from the garden. I think i would have kept the lateral window a bit smaller, I think on the left of the house, that wall is too small and the neighbours would be a little to curious for my taste. Maybe a big tree in front of the lateral elevation will do the trick?

  • Denying the natural characteristics of brick, which are weight and how they relate to the ground plane.

  • DJ

    The new window doesn’t align with existing glazing. A pity.

  • Concerned Citizen

    I guess the big window was put in to obfuscate the fact that there are five bedrooms (two with double beds) and only one bathroom in the whole house.

    Then, the exposed dining room goes beyond kinky to exhibitionism, when doing the magic on the dining room table occurs.