Szymon Hanczar crams his entire city home into 13 square metres

| 28 comments

Polish designer Szymon Hanczar's micro apartment in Wroclaw contains a kitchen, bedroom and bathroom all within the confines of just 13 square metres (+ slideshow).

Szymon Hanczar crams his entire city home into 13 square metres

Hanczar – a lecturer at Wroclaw Academy of Fine Arts & Design – used the tiny apartment primarily as a place to sleep, but wanted it to feel more like home.

Szymon Hanczar crams his entire city home into 13 square metres

"The flat was for me like storage and hotel room," Hanczar told Dezeen. "It was the greatest solution after being like a squatter."

"Extremely small flats are great for people who are Minimalist, who want to enjoy the city life."

Szymon Hanczar crams his entire city home into 13 square metres

The double bed rests on top of a built-in wooden unit that houses the compact white-tiled bathroom, accessed by a sliding door at the side.

The platform also extends over the tiny kitchen area, located at the back of the space behind the front door. A sink, small cupboards and a clever chopping board hidden within a drawer beneath the countertop are all included, but can only be used when the door is shut.

Szymon Hanczar crams his entire city home into 13 square metres

In front of the bathroom, a larger cupboard contains a small washing machine, clothes and other homeware essentials.

The ladder used to access the bed moves side to side on a rail along the edge of the platform so the closet doors can be opened.

Szymon Hanczar crams his entire city home into 13 square metres

A long chest of drawers for extra storage and a small desk are located on opposite walls.



As well as functional elements, the designer added decorative features to make the space feel more homely.

"Despite the small space it was not my intention to give up comfort and functionality," Hanczar said. "There's even a hammock for lovers of having their heads in the clouds."

Szymon Hanczar crams his entire city home into 13 square metres

The hammock is hung at the end of the room in front of the only window. Hanzar's bike hooks over a wooden shelf placed high on the wall, keeping it out of the way while creating a focal point.

"A bike is an integral element of life in the city," Hanczar told Dezeen. "It's the best means of transport, it's eco-friendly and fast. Because of lack of space I hung it on the wall and it became a decoration."

Szymon Hanczar crams his entire city home into 13 square metres

Plants and lamps help to brighten up the space, which is kept as light as possible with white walls and light wood flooring.

"Everything is maintained in bright colours which visually expands the space," Hanczar told Dezeen. "All of this adds up to a welcoming aesthetic and surprisingly functional space."

Szymon Hanczar crams his entire city home into 13 square metres

There is a rising trend in designers taking advantage of small spaces, particularly in response to the soaring costs of city property.

Poland is also home to what the architect of a 122-centimetre-wide dwelling claims to be world's narrowest house.

Szymon Hanczar crams his entire city home into 13 square metres

A duo in Berlin added a pine unit to a tiny apartment to provide a kitchen, bathroom and mezzanine level, and a Swiss designer created a space-efficient box to form a separate sleeping area and compact storage solutions for studio apartments.

Elsewhere, students and faculty members at a UCLA research lab unveiled a tiny house to address California's low-cost housing shortage, while a competition was launched in New York to design "micro-units" to help solve the shortage of small apartments in Manhattan.

Szymon Hanczar crams his entire city home into 13 square metres
Floor plan – click for larger image
Szymon Hanczar crams his entire city home into 13 square metres
Long section
  • TT

    Yep, I just like to put my bike way up there for extra exercise.

  • Jus

    As nice as it looks, there are a few “buts”.

    Where does he keep his bike after a ride in the rain etc? Not that I believe he’s bothered to put it up there each time he’s used it anyway.

    And things like the sliding chopping board – wouldn’t all the crumbs get into the drawer below (through the gap)?

    • k0n

      Maybe there’s a breadcrumb tray fitted below the chopping board? That would be my first idea.

  • Meme

    For the sake of one’s self esteem, it’s too small.

  • Yousif El Helw

    Does he live off takeaways? Where’s the stove?

    • k0n

      It is stated in his own words, it’s “for people who are Minimalist, who want to enjoy the city life.” I would imagine this means eating out on a regular basis.

      Still, it wouldn’t kill to have a small induction stove integrated, as it can easily double as a regular counter when not in use.

  • mouse

    No shower!

    • SteveLeo

      Shower is in the bathroom. It’s a wet room with a drain in the centre and a curtain shown dotted.

  • feng

    Obviously not enough storage room.

  • Bazv

    Ridiculous design. Trying to gloss over housing shortage? Haves and haves not, exploiting the poor for the rich.

    • Pretendgineer

      How so? I fail to see how using space efficiently is some sort of act of class warfare.

      • Meme

        When you expect poor people to live like canned sprats.

        • Pretendgineer

          Stop projecting issues onto unrelated projects. The designer is a lecturer at Wroclaw Academy of Fine Arts and Design, hardly poor and has not mentioned doing this as a typology or test for low-income living.

      • Bazv

        Here is an insightful vision provided over 40 years ago of how our current sick society will play out: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FASvJF21yXU

      • Bazv

        Guess you’ve never cooked or stored a bike in your bedroom? For an idea of what I am speaking about watch on Youtube: architect from Pluto, taken from the Holy Mountain film by Jodorowsky over 40 years ago. Highly insightful view of our current sick society.

        • Pretendgineer

          I have done both those things. Neither is ideal, neither is preferable to having a separate or even a segregated space for them.

          That’s not the issue. You’ve made this project out to be a class issue that somehow glosses over a housing crisis. I’d like you to explain yourself in your own words and not with clips or rhetorical questions.

          How is this project, for the designer himself, to meet his own needs glossing over the housing shortage? How can this be construed as “Haves and haves not, exploiting the poor for the rich.”?

      • Bazv

        Nice to see Dezeen thought police have deleted my last two replies!

        • Hi Bazv, You posted your comments during the night when we were asleep. We’ve published it now. Kind regards, Ross/Dezeen

          • Bazv

            Nice to see comments on in full! The internet never sleeps, unless you cut the power off?

  • Gabriel Rodrigues

    With this bed almost in the ceiling, I wonder how these people have sex.

    • MM

      The ceiling offers excellent leverage!

    • Nanush

      He is a Minimalist. One hand, once a month. And he still has his room in Mama’s house to store his winter clothes.

  • Bravo! We wonder how much rent this could fetch.

  • tfw

    Stop breeding!

  • James

    Confining a human to what is essentially a cupboard is a sad symptom of modern economics and city life. These projects are cleverly negotiating the real issue: affordable and liveable houses in urban centres. More attention should be focused on the real issues rather than these beautiful but unworkable solutions.

  • SIgn

    Poor design with controversy in economy. Yeah, he could live there happy, like everyone in their rooms.

  • michael

    I don’t understand why people comment on this as if it’s a real house. Of course there’s no space for storage. It’s a pied-à-terre! Makes perfect sense to me. Minimal work-focused living during the week and upstate (at mom’s house if you like) during the weekends.

  • Pretendgineer

    It’s number two, I’m afraid. If you deem a designer, designing his own home for himself as acting to further a class divide, then the issue is with you and not the project.

    If he were designing for another person, but to meet his own needs, then perhaps I’d agree with you somewhat, but he’s not so I don’t.

    You still haven’t explained your initial comment though, so I’m not sure how to respond further. I don’t care if Johnny Depp and Warren Buffet buy LA and bulldoze all the ghettos; it has nothing to do with this. I’ll wait for you to explain your initial comment, but I think I’ll be waiting a while.