Crystal Clear by CF Møller and Kristin Jarmund Arkitekter

Danish architects CF Møller and Norwegian practice Kristin Jarmund Arkitekter have won a competition to design three office towers in Oslo.

crystal_clear_oslo_sq.jpg

Called Crystal Clear, the winning design features towers composed of consists of stacked glazed boxes.

crystal_clear_oslo3_sq.jpg

Here's some info from CF Møller:

--

C.F.Møller Architects and Norwegian Kristin Jarmund Arkitekter cooperate to design a new landmark for Oslo

C. F. Møller Architects, in collaboration with Kristin Jarmund Arkitekter, has won a major competition to design a spectacular new landmark project in the city of Oslo, for the client KLP AS, one of Norway's largest property investors. The project, which has been dubbed "Crystal Clear", consists of three towers, which grow organically from the ground to form a sculptural cluster, and are composed of stacked, prismatic volumes.C. F. Møller Architects, in collaboration with Kristin Jarmund Arkitekter, has won a major competition to design a spectacular new landmark project in the city of Oslo, for the client KLP AS, one of Norway's largest property investors. The project, which has been dubbed "Crystal Clear", consists of three towers, which grow organically from the ground to form a sculptural cluster, and are composed of stacked, prismatic volumes.
crystal_clear_oslo2_credit_.jpg

The development totals approx. 90,000 m2 of offices, commercial space and possibly housing, located at one of Oslo's most valuable sites, the former postal sorting office adjacent to the central station. 'Crystal Clear' ties in with the city's skyline, and the string of developing landmark projects that will help turn Oslo into one of Europe's most modern capitals.

crystal_clear_oslo1_credit_.jpg

Partner and architect Mads Mandrup Hansen states:

"Crystal Clear" is a unique proposal for a modern, Nordic cluster of towers - a Norwegian urban rock, that in an exiting way adds to the city's strategic endeavour to interlace town and port into a contemporary and lively waterfront, and at the same time fulfils the client KLP Eiendom's vision to build the most groundbreaking high-rise offices in Scandinavia.

With "Crystal Clear" in Oslo, and two further high-rise projects in Sweden and two in Denmark, C. F. Møller Architects is cementing the position as leading designers of contemporary towers, adapted to the Nordic regional conditions, and focused on allowing high-rise developments enrich the urban domain. "Crystal Clear" is an excellent success story of how we deploy our strongest architectural skills in the field across borders, with a hand-picked team from Copenhagen, Aarhus and Oslo, to create an exceptional result.

Similarly, we will focus on sustainable environmental initiatives, reducing the complex' carbon footprint considerably - as a natural part of C. F. Møller Architects strategies of environmental certification and planning methods. Our ambition is that this project will be a large-scale demonstration of our many experiences gathered in sustainable design over the last years.

We are proud that "Crystal Clear" once again gives us the chance to contribute a significant new project to the city of Oslo, strengthening our position in Norway, and demonstrating the broad spectre of skills our office possesses."

"Crystal Clear", which is being developed in collaboration with Kristin Jarmund arkitekter AS in Oslo, is C. F. Møller Architects' fourth major building in the Norwegian capital - starting with the Bislett Stadium, the most famous athletics facility in the Nordic region, which was inaugurated at the international Golden League athletics event in 2005. Last year, the new Akershus University Hospital outside Oslo opened, as Norway's most modern healthcare facility. Currently C. F. Møller Architects are also working on the restoration of the historic Domus Media building at the University of Oslo, this time collaborating with Erik Møller arkitekter.

ATKINS and Norwegian Erichsen og Horgen AS are appointed as engineers on "Crystal Clear", which is expected to be completed within 3-5 years.