Multi-storey Temporary Housing by Shigeru Ban Architects

Multi-storey Temporary Housing by Shigeru Ban Architects

Shigeru Ban Architects have designed temporary homes for Japanese disaster victims inside a chequerboard of stacked shipping containers.

Multi-storey Temporary Housing by Shigeru Ban Architects

Above and below: prototype unit

Once the Multi-storey Temporary Housing is constructed it will provide 188 homes in Onagawa for those left homeless by the Japanese earthquake and tsunami.

Multi-storey Temporary Housing by Shigeru Ban Architects

The containers can be placed on unlevel terrain or narrow sites and should be able to withstand future earthquakes.

Multi-storey Temporary Housing by Shigeru Ban Architects

Containers can be stacked up to three storeys high, with open spaces between each apartment.

Multi-storey Temporary Housing by Shigeru Ban Architects

The architects, who have constructed one prototype apartment, suggest that temporary residents may choose to stay in the containers permanently.

Multi-storey Temporary Housing by Shigeru Ban Architects

Since the disaster in Japan, Dezeen has published a few projects by designers to raise money for victims - see all the stories here.

Multi-storey Temporary Housing by Shigeru Ban Architects

Another recent story on Dezeen features shipping containers that provide a sea-facing observation deck - click here for more stories about container architecture.

Multi-storey Temporary Housing by Shigeru Ban Architects

Images are from Shigeru Ban Architects

Multi-storey Temporary Housing by Shigeru Ban Architects

Here's some more information is proved by the architects:


Multistorey Container Temporary Housing

Temporary housing are starting to be deployed disaster areas.

Multi-storey Temporary Housing by Shigeru Ban Architects

However, the number of the amount of housing required is insufficient. The main reason is that most of the damaged coast areas are not on level terrain.

Multi-storey Temporary Housing by Shigeru Ban Architects

Usually, temporary housing is suitable for flatlands, and providing the required number of units is difficult.

Click above for larger image

Our project to Onagawa, Miyagi prefecture is to use existing shipping containers (20 feet) and stack them in a checkerboard pattern up to three stories.

Multi-storey Temporary Housing by Shigeru Ban Architects

Click above for larger image

The Characteristics of multistory temporary housing:

» shorten the construction period by usage of existing containers
» possible to build up tp 3 stories and to be build in narrow sites or slope lands
» placing containers in a checkerboard pattern and create a open living space in between
» excellent seismic performance
» can be used as a permanent apartment