The Difference of Ebitsuka by 403architecture

The Difference of Ebitsuka by 403architecture

Japanese architects 403architecture have turned the floor of this refurbished apartment in Hamamatsu into a huge chest of drawers.

The Difference of Ebitsuka by 403architecture

It was only during the renovation that the architects discovered the large void beneath the suspended floor and decided to use it for storage.

The Difference of Ebitsuka by 403architecture

Clear, corrugated plastic fronts the new sliding drawers, while scaffolding supports shelves behind and the floor slabs above.

The Difference of Ebitsuka by 403architecture

Sheets of white fabric hang like shower curtains from a railing affixed to the exposed concrete ceiling and circle the lower level of the open-plan living room.

The Difference of Ebitsuka by 403architecture

You can see more interiors that look unfinished here, including an office with wooden pallets for desks.

The Difference of Ebitsuka by 403architecture

Photography is by Kenta Hasegawa.

Here's a few more words from 403architecture:


The Difference of Ebitsuka

While managing the construction process of an apartment in Hamamatsu, 403architecture [dajiba] discovered a deep false floor, changed plans. And we used the empty space to generate a new lifestyle.

The Difference of Ebitsuka by 403architecture

This building has only 15 apartments on 3 floors and it is located along the river. The room in focus is on the ground floor. During construction, we discovered this amazing underfloor space and we decided to use it.

The Difference of Ebitsuka by 403architecture

Multi-purpose storage cabinets rest under the micro-mezzanine. We want to use architectural improvisation as a trigger to a more imaginative life.