Technicolor Bloom by Brennan Buck

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Technicolor Bloom is an architectural installation constructed from 1400 flat plywood panels to form a double-curved perforated tunnel.

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Designed by Brennan Buck with Rob Henderson and students from the University of Applied Arts in Vienna, Austria, the project is currently on show at the Museum of Applied Arts (MAK) in Vienna.

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Buck is assistant Professor at the University of Applied Arts in Vienna and a critic at Yale School of Architecture.

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Photos are by Christof Gaggl.

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Here's some info from Buck:

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Technicolor Bloom

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Technicolor Bloom is a kaleidoscopic architectural prototype built from 1400 uniquely cut, flat plywood panels.

Installed for the first time in Fall 2007, Technicolor Bloom recently won an international FEIDAD Design Merit Award (www.feidad.org) and is now on show at the MAK (Museum of Applied Arts) in Vienna.

Designed and fabricated by Brennan Buck with Rob Henderson and students from the University of Applied Arts in Vienna, Technicolor Bloom uses completely standard, scalable fabrication technology to produce doubly curved, digitally designed architectural form. It proposes a method and a set of aesthetic principles that extend the architectural potential of topological form by incorporating architectural systems such as structure, aperture, fenestration and construction directly into the project's geometry. The result is a spatial study of the literal and phenomenal effects of 3-dimensional pattern.

www.technicolorbloom.com

  • http://poppypetunia.blogspot.com JUST COOL Design Blog

    I’d like to walk through this lacy winter wonderland- it does look like snowflakes and battenberg lace – maybe dusty spiderwebs too.

  • edward

    A formidable piece of work, even with the aid of current technology. I would like to see a cross section through the joints to see how it’s held together. More ominiously, this probably heralds more convoluted buildings to come.

  • Bozo

    Very nice. Finally someone laser cut the subdiv’s

  • rodger

    oh, i don’t know. a technical tour de force maybe. as a piece of design, its a blah application from a facile computer skilled pattern maker. ie. its way underdeveloped conceptually, and in reality it looks like a mess.

  • ubertect

    What was it? Convert Nurbs to Polys, Polys to Subdivs and then?
    Congrats on realizing this thing- a monument to the tools we tool around with ; )

  • johnny utah

    tesselate!

  • http://www.elastik.net Igor Kebel

    Technologies and techiques form our thoughts, and this piece is a rather an enjoyable example of such a mindset.

  • Fling

    The experience seems be like being trapped in Jordan’s underwear drawer.

  • El Greco

    I guess if you lasercut grandma’s Venetian doily it becomes cool… to some.

  • adjSpcs

    I find this project to be missing quite a bit in terms of a conceptual discourse. Obviously, the designer has an interest in the affective dimension of space, and thus architectural design; however, the overall effect leaves me wanting more. Perhaps, more through less. The use of subDivision tessellation is also quite distracting. If the project is exploring issues related to recursion and subsequent distortions why not just say that and be on with it? Otherwise, the project comes off as a bit confused and too heavily reliant on buzz terms and techniques.

  • gaque

    technically cool. but the STYLE is just embarrassing…

    this idea of “incorporating architectural systems such as structure, aperture, fenestration and construction directly into the project’s geometry” is very fascinating and has lots of potential–however this project really seems like only an exercise in sexy-ass-modeling.

  • xtiaan

    it looks purdy

    “It proposes a method and a set of aesthetic principles that extend the architectural potential of topological form by incorporating architectural systems such as structure, aperture, fenestration and construction directly into the project’s geometry”

    this is so heavy on the art wank its gonna implode, its a pretty folly, be done with it!
    colour used serves only to further confuse the issues here.

  • http://www.zaha-hadid.com/ Eva

    Xtiann-

    Read the above sentence at a pace your mind needs to absorb it.

    Basic idea translation of above paragraph quoted by Xtiaan:

    This ‘topological form’ (a reasonable, correct description) is great because it incorporates windows, and structure into the way the the thing was thought of from the beginning.

    They are stating that this is different than a form that needs to be ‘jacked-up’ after it is designed, or ‘punctured’ with windows post-design. We all know how many digitally-driven architectural projects are conceived in that post-operations manner. The above paragraph simply says that the digital technique and aesthetic feeling used to design the project, took the creation of structure and windows into account- from the very beginning.

    I’m definitely in favor of eliminating bullshit from Architecture, but I don’t like when critics think it’s cool to pretend to be Morons…

    Xtiaan, I think this at least, is a bit more than just “purdy” as you say..

  • David

    Model simple form + Catmull-Clarke subdivision + lasercut.

  • http://www.hasselaar.nl Hasselaar

    That is what you call an nice tunnelvision! Verry creative and inspirative…