Rocking Platforms by Constantinos Economides

| 13 comments

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Designer Constantinos Economides has sent a few photos of his Rocking Plaftorms - a range of rockers made of found chairs mounted on curved wooden platforms.

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Economides recently completed an MA in industrial design at Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design in London.

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Here's some text from Economides:

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The rocking platforms offer salvation to a discarded chair’s life by re-using it, but also anew relationship with its user. The dawn of this relationship is also enhanced by the new experience the rocking platform has to offer.

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Nonetheless, the use of one’s favorite chair, therefore transforming it into a rocking one, would enhance more experiences by using it extending in this way what the user cherishes into a higher level.

The rocking platforms come in two sizes, enabling them to be used individually or together, as with the example of the chair and the cradle. The rocking platforms are made form solid ash and were built by Batch Design in Brighton.

  • edward

    Notice how the white chair has the top of the seat relieved to accommodate the cheeks: the strapping bisects this zone making use of said chair uncomfortable. A non-solution. Next!

  • K. Rimane

    Dezeen, the “Junk” section has now become a necessity.
    I don’t think most readers in here are interested in seeing kinder garden pseudo projects quite frankly.

  • BRian

    Dude, C,

    You made it, man!

    Great balance of Metaphor and functionality!

    B

  • http://www.artsblog.it Margherita

    I took a picture of his project last year at Salone del Mobile 2007, in Milan. Very nice work. Anyone tested if it works with babies?

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/visionet-art/479012929/in/set-72157600161715239/

  • fergus

    reminds me a bit of this one

    http://www.designboom.com/rocking/wheel.html

  • christopher

    Great idea.

    Too bad it doesn’t work, like Edward says.

  • Frankie

    Always nice to rock and recycle, shame it looks like dog S*IT

  • Honkie

    I am with K Rimane; bring on the ‘junk’ section……………

  • bald skull

    brilliant!

    an instant classic!

    more clever and whimsy then you can believe it.

  • Brian

    Uh… Dude?
    I thought that using so-called ‘junk’ was considered recycling. I guess that not all the bloggers informed themselves it was about recycling!

    As for the comment: “the strapping bisects this zone making use of said chair uncomfortable”. Dude! This statement is so obvious it creates its own ‘negative distortion field’ thereby developing an event plane, disintegrating the argument leaving the reader wondering why even bother?

    Listen, I am being facetious. Obviously he could have strung the straps over the leg batons, but this way shows the tension, creating a dramatic VISUAL interplay.

    B

  • Vladimir Boson

    Excellent, that’s great!!!

  • Dave

    But Brian, not all chairs have leg batons. The idea as I understand it is to use any kind of found chair.

  • Daniel

    I am always amazed at how good artists and designers are at scratching biting and spitting!
    Can you actually do a degree in slacking off design? I wonder why people get so agressive when they see other people’s ideas! What about good willing interpretation?
    1. The rocking platform for wheelchairs is quite different. Its cool but in fact so different that I think both projects deserve to exist in their own right!
    2. Lets face it! we live in the 21st century, nobody is going to reinvent the wheel! However what Constantinos did is to create an add on that allows the very simple transformation of any piece of furniture! Whats wrong with that?
    3. This is an inspiring project because it deals with the issue of reuse in a refreshing and witty way. If you fail to recognize that, maybe you are not using the wrong side of your brain a little too much!