Lighten Up by [re]design

| 3 comments

firewinder-by-the-firewinder-company.jpg

Green design collective [re]design presented a range of sustainable lights from various British designers including Julia Lohmann, Jericho Hands, Rawstudio, bluegreen&co and others at 100% Design in London last month.

circa-light-by-rawstudio.jpg

Here is a selection of the lights that were exhibited. Top image: Firewinder by The Firewinder Company. Above: Circa light by Rawstudio

the-bakelite-telephone-lamp-by-jericho-hands.jpg

Above: The Bakelite telephone lamp, made from an old telephone by Jericho Hands.

nesting-lamp-by-julia-lohmann.jpg

Above: Nesting lamp, made from kelp by Julia Lohmann. More on this project in our earlier story.

The following is from Redesign:

--
Bright ideas matter.

It is widely accepted that we have no more than 10 years to tackle climate change. We are at a crucial stage of eco-awareness.
We all know about energy-efficient lightbulbs and their role in cutting carbon emissions. With new lighting technologies proliferating and many countries phasing out incandescent bulbs, we’re also at a pivotal point in the history of lighting.

ecopetlite-by-ateliero.jpg

So, with Lighten Up, [re]design looks beyond the bulb. Good design is good for the planet and makes people feel good. Above: Ecopetlite by Ateliero.

radiance-by-ed-horsford.jpg

How can lighting design light up our lives? The quest for sustainability is driving the evolution of new aesthetics, materials and interactions, as well as technologies. Above: Radiance by Ed Horsford

lamppot-by-alanna-cochrane.jpg

The approaches you’ll find here include: A focus on efficiency: new uses and looks for energy-efficient lighting technology, renewable energy sources, monitoring energy use and motivating behaviour change. Above: Lamppot by Alanna Cochrane

the-apprentice-lamp-by-bluegreenco.jpg

Awareness of material choices: sustainably produced natural resources, local production, reclaimed or recycled materials. Consideration of the relationship between product and user: adaptability and responsiveness, user as maker, and designs that recall past times. Above: The apprentice lamp by bluegreen&co

agoon-by-re-silicone.jpg

Long-term thinking: products that last a lifetime, and design with future lifecycles in mind. Above: Agoon by Re-silicone

crush-by-jamsheed-todiwala.jpg

Each chapter investigates one of nine essential [re]strategies for sustainable design – offering insight and inspiration for the next generation of lighting. So get switched on. You never know, you may even enjoy your very own ‘lightbulb moment’. Here’s where a little light reading can make a big difference… Above: Crush by Jamsheed Todiwala

tetra-lamp-by-masif-designs.jpg

Above: Tetra lamp by Masif Designs

tibia-floor-lamp-by-studiomold.jpg

Above: Tibia floor lamp by Studiomold

solid-by-studiomama.jpg

Above: Solid by Studiomama

pulp-lamp-by-david-gardener1.jpg

Above: Pulp lamp by David Gardener. More about this project in our earlier story.

pack-by-rentaro-nishimura.jpg

Above: Pack by Rentaro Nishimura

non-standard-lamp-by-anna-mcconnell.jpg

Above: Non standard lamp by Anna Mcconnell

eco-desk-lamp-by-luminair1.jpg

Above: Eco desk lamp by Luminair

drunk-by-yoon-bahk1.jpg

Above: Drunk by Yoon Bahk

  • Modular

    “Non Standard Lamp” rocks!

  • katie

    I like “Pulp lamp” and “Drunk” – good ideas

  • http://00 zuy

    milk packaging tetra lamp design and tibia floor lamp are followers of some dutch and german design…