OrganiCube by Christian Precht

| 47 comments

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Austrian designer Christian Precht has designed a compact living environment called OrganiCube.

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The conceptual nine square metre apartment is made of Corian and comprises facilities for living, sleeping, working and bathing.

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Here's some more information from Precht:

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OrganiCube explores the creative potential of the material world on the one hand and a study of living in a limited space on the other hand.

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Living on a small ground floor things have to get shifted to achieve the largest possible shell.

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It is an alternate look of an income-appropriate living unit of 3x3x3 meter. The idea is to take facilities that belong to living and to its tradition inherently and transform it into a coherent design. Through its cubic shape, the OrganiCube can be easily stacked and implemented in many environments.

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The infinitive space is conceived as a technological double skin, mainly manufactured out of DuPont's Corian.

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The design shows what the abilities of material in the future are: fluid, dynamic and curvilinear in one complex shape, which includes all needs for modern living. Therefore the organizational and formal structure is based on functional elements. OrganiCube defines a new architectural condition outside the orthogonal, off-grid and harmonic inside.

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Getting all the facilities on a ground floor of 9sqm, functional elements have to be compact and compressed. Through compression things get folded.These foldings are a functional element as well and the Cube provides a high standard of accommodation for one or two people, defining main facilities: living/sleeping/working and a separate bathroom.

At one place a line shapes for example the wardrobe and a few steps further it flows into a completely different living setup. All featured curves have their distinctive function and purpose. Through this moving and fluid interior the cube should bring harmony to residents in a sensual way.

  • andy

    “OrganiCube explores the creative potential of the material world”

    …There’s nothing I like more than reveling in the beauty of a Corian landscape.

  • Q

    it seems a very healthy habitat,really!

  • XING

    how do they realize it? so seamless and fluent surface, all prefabricated in factory?

  • http://www.cloudoutloud.tv/category/advertising/ Michelle McCormack

    The future really is now. Cool.

  • James

    Sing-Sing has come a long way.

  • Mad Scientist

    “infinite space” hahaha

  • stev

    this is a horror. is there anybody here who would like to live in such a narrow cabin?

  • eric luyckx

    to cold for me. Why not in wood ?

  • Arash Dailami

    it’s really nice.perfect.excellent.

  • daniel

    i like the idea of the cube. that’s pretty futuristic. but the messy stuff in the middle of it? i don’t get it.

  • a.libi

    great project… !!!!!!!!!!!!
    rocks!

  • A.S.

    Yo know the project “Six Cellules” (1992) by ABSALON french artist, small units very beautiful and much more simple…

    http://www.thegalleriesatmoore.org/publications/absalontour.shtml

  • M-Boogie

    Really nicely modelled! A world of architecture I want to explore myself as well.

    I only have a few things to nag about it:
    – more cuts within the surfaces would have been nice. Just to split certain areas from each other. E.g. it might be helpful to stop spoilt water from running into the whole cube.
    – Speaking of a soaking wet bed… the kitchen might be a bit close to that cozy niche. The water running over the sink will rinse directly into your lounge.
    – More materials! At least some more colors. (andy mentioned it already….) Perforate it, slice it, backlighten it, ripple it, …
    – Very unspired lighting and shower head. You can solve those problems whithin your geometry.
    – More lighting anyway!
    – Design your own chair! Although it’s a thing for understanding the scale I would get rid of it. It looks a bit lost in your universal design approach.

  • http://michaelschoner.de michael

    scary, man!

    imagine you leave a book on the floor, want to scotch tape some poster on the wall, leave your yesterdays socks somewhere and you find something kitsch on the flee-market… quite totalitarian!
    i prefer open systems…
    (your office chair becomes a joke in this enviroment)
    anyhow – no hatin’

    has something of schwitters merzbau, though!

    good luck!

  • Peter

    Alright, because the space is limited, i additionally waste a lot of possible storage space with sculpture like nonsense?

    The main problem i have with those shapes is that they pretend to be individual, but only force an extremely fixed environment on the occupants that is solely the individual expression of the architect. I´d probably kill myself after a week in such an actually extremely boring would-be fluid interior.

  • asusual

    as usual, a habitat that is not functionally displayed when you consider the wires and crap humans must deal with on a daily basis. All of the mundane extras that follow us around (power cords, toilet paper, contact lens solution) have no home in a beautiful place like this.

  • vampire

    higher and higher standards being set up everyday for younger generation of architects

  • dj

    oooooooooooo!aaaaaaaaahhh!

  • http://www.mikevontiesenhausen.com mike

    conceptually this is nice, and i like the write up about it however, i dont understand how everyone keeps getting away with calling this style of design fluid. an empty 3x3x3 cube would has way more fluidity in my mind. this seems a bit cramped because all of the structure is static. isnt fluidity more about being able to move things around to best suit your needs/mood?

    just a thought. the ‘exploration of the material world’ is definately achieved, but i think there are way more interesting ways to live in a 3x3x3 cube.

  • phil

    der chris.. tsss

    neu gerendert.. sieht sehr gut aus… lob!
    mir gefallen deine arbeiten sehr.. mach weiter so!

  • http://www.spaceTM.com SpaceTM

    I’m not sure about this. Sitting here at home, with my toes nestling in a rug, I like it. But could I live in it? I don’t think so. It’s too shiny. It glares at you. And where could you put up pictures and things that make a space a home, personal to oneself?

  • maaama

    it’s fun but too tacky and one-season like

  • jon

    oh oh!
    I can already sense the critics this project is about to receive!

  • damaiyanto

    i think the form, the surfaces are too rigid, too complicated, too static, therefore create a sense that there’s no chance for the person who live there to have a personal touch. It’s a one man space, or perhaps no man, maybe a robot with a very specific life programmed?? To create a living environment in a 3x3x3 space, i think i should leave decent opportunities as much as i could give.
    But hey.., that’s only my opinion.. :)

  • HC

    This reminds me of Zahas rooms at Hotel Puerta America, which are also sculpted in Corian. However, this made the rooms seem smaller than those made by other architects, because of the distorted perspective and cramped shapes. So how this experience would be in a 3x3x3 cube, I’d rather not try..

  • http://everydayarchitecture.blog.com Joaquin

    Look what Hadid, or maybe Gehry, has brought all the architects into. Now they can’t shake these stuff out of them.

    No offense, but there’s originality in art than there’s in architecture today.

  • james

    yikes. I’m all for rethinking small spaces, but this is too jagged and harsh

  • http://www.studio2a.net adamk

    Heh Heh, don’t slip! Why so small? 50% larger and might have something here….

  • choadbag

    i can imagine golem living in this and polishing it all day, and i kind of want to do the same.

    i think it’s reasonably attractive, but what purpose does all of that fluid corian surface serve? i think if i had to live in a box that small, realistically, i’d rather have more room rather that all those contorted surfaces.

    also, if they are stacked, what happens to the daylighting coming in through the roof?

  • Kenja

    Putting this in a proper perspective would actually make this quite unremarkable. As an apartment unit, dorm, or prison cell; this design seems extreme, but apply it in a maritime setting and it is pretty much the norm for fiberglass boat interiors.

    One thing that must considered with no kidding aside, “How does one have sex in such an environment wit their partner?”. This partner is, of course, to be considered a visitor to this dwelling since it seems impossible for cohabitation in such an environment. Instead of showing people in trendy attire leaning on it, show a silhouette of a couple getting it on in the bedroom.

  • http://www.ultrafeel.tv fun-da-mental

    Supercool design, and great invention for the future where space will become increasingly rare and expensive.

  • ugh

    ugh… an interesting design, but nothing more. people can’t live like this.

  • Nakul

    Life in plastic, anyone ?

  • Angela

    This is a great little compact design, but you have to consider the use of corian (a lippery surface) and the fact that there is a shower directly below the raised sleeping area…so that the dweller and his bedding would get very hot and very wet after each shower :S

  • Angela

    This is a great little compact design, but you have to consider the use of corian (a slippery surface) and the fact that there is a shower directly below the raised sleeping area…so that the dweller and his bedding would get very hot and very wet after each shower :S

  • Renzo

    I suggest this form be constucted by excretion from nano-robots.

  • amelia

    white walls and white floors… cleaning is going to be hell. but It’s a great idea nonetheless. I wont mind trying it out… looks cosy enough :) though we probably wont be able to hold dinner parties at home anymore. And we can’t have too many offspring… unless this is housing for singles only.

  • Dave

    Yeah, because all like to spend my private hours in small, slippery, white, plastic, antiseptic spaces. See you in the psych ward.

    I’ve grown weary of “futuristic” designs that insist that in the times to come we will have managed to eradicate our sense of character.

  • Lyn

    Woooow… the design is excellent, although I’d probably go mad with the amount of white (which I suppose is easily rectified with colour); it’s a fantastic idea regardless. I love the kitchen, and the bed!

    I’m finding it hard to imagine myself personalising this as a place of my own though… interesting as it may be, everything seems a bit cold and sterile; I like a place that has a bit more of a “live-able” feeling.

  • http://no kuwait

    many dust and losing your stuf (for exaple the remotcontrol!) in this place! but its nice

  • Martins

    Excelent… Briliant solution for future generations…

  • piti

    nice rendering

  • yoon y m

    good
    Is a beautiful thought. Immediately to practical affairs

  • http://www.twitter.com/hihogaby Min Jeong Son

    I wonder what the new material Corian is. What would I feel if I were in that cube space with somebody? Fantastic~ Today I am going to introduce this OrganiCube to kids in the math class.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000872979669 Jeff Thomas

    if any one can do better please fill free. I think it takes a lot of thinking too come up with such a thing, and art is always in the making so dont nock it.I see it could really take off in the colage comunity, and who knows.. maybe a three bedroom?
    hope u enjoy as much as me.

  • Danilo

    It looks nice…but I'm afraid I would break my back in that cube! :)

  • NSS

    I love it, but I can't read all of the letters in the diagram.