Nestlé Application Group Querétaro by
Rojkind Arquitectos

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More from Rojkind Arquitectos, who collaborated on the New Tamayo Museum in our previous story: the architects have recently completed a laboratory building for food brand Nestlé.

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Rojkind Arquitectos also designed the Nestlé Chocolate Museum in our previous story.

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Located in Querétaro, Mexico, the laboratory comprises cubic volumes with intersecting domes cut from underneath.

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The exterior is clad in metallic, reflective glass while the interiors are painted in bright colours.

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The cut-away parts of the facade are highlighted in bright yellow.

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Photographs by Paul Rivera.

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Here's some more information from Rojkind Arquitectos:

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Reyner Banham argues in his “A Concrete Atlantis” that “there is a causal, cultural, and conscious connection between” some “masterworks of explicit architectural modernism” and “the utilitarian structures of a certain period and type of North American industry.” Since the first decades of the 20th century, from Loos and Berhens to Gropius and Le Corbusier, among others, a constant trip was made back and forth from architecture to industrial building –until then at the margins of what was properly considered architecture – a trip that still is a characteristic of contemporary architecture.

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To re-imagine industrial building was one of architecture's principal tasks and a way to pay back a debt for the help that industrial building gave architecture, to get rid of the formal and stylistic burden of two centuries of rhetorical academicism and empty eclecticism. Re-imagining was understood as the invention of a new image between an operative logic and a mediatic logo.

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The work that Rojkind arquitectos has completed for another pair of Nestlé factories can be signed on this streak. Starting from the hallway to its chocolate factory located on the outsides of Toluca, near Mexico City: a structure made out of faceted planes attached to the existent factory that works as a Museum that still has Phase 2 to develop. The second assignment, on the industrial zone of Querétaro, a Laboratory building whose main objetives are: To be the open innovation example for Nestlé and the rig driver for Nestlé Mexico through continuous consumer, client and business relevant innovation for flexible manufacturing, to be the packaging competence centre and innovation drive for Nestle Mexico, and to operate as a satellite to PTC Marsyville to become the centre of competence in liquid beverages in Latin America.

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In addition to the relation with existing industrial structures, this new commission involved an extra challenge. In 1996 UNESCO declared the historic center of Queretaro World Heritage Site, which had unforeseen effects even in the industrial periphery: the new building had to be an arched portico –tradition oblige. Rojkind faced this issue reinterpreting both the arch and the portico.

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If an arch is a still fragment of a dome or –what is the same– a dome is an amplified arch turning over its own axis, doesn’t matter: a dome can fulfill the demand for an arch without falling back on clichés. In this case, a series of intersected domes, multiplied as a foam, form the matrix of an open and continuous space –the portico– which expands while another space, formed by simple boxes cladded in a satin finish reflective glass, contains the expansion of spheres –which in turn extrudes– and houses the laboratory program.

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While the apparently metallic and impregnable exteriors are opaque, the interiors of these boxes, painted in different colors, have an almost theatrical quality: in their white working coats, researches float in a continuous blue, yellow or green, cut out against a contrasting color. Sometimes, when one of the exterior panels reveals itself as a window, these interiors can be guessed from the outside.

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Maybe elsewhere this project would have been built using sophisticated technologies for the customized production of specific parts according to the complex geometry of the spheres. Here, this geometry had to be translated from formal and spatial logics into a simple, almost colloquial constructive logic, which allowed local construction builders to build the foamy space by means of the physical intersection of semi-spherical domes assembled with arches and rings of steel rods.

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The final result is a series of unified contrast: metallic, glossy exterior, with and against brilliant, colorful interiors, the abstract planes of the exterior boxes, with and against the exuberance of the connected spheres. It may be that the strength of this project results from this play of opposites that, in a dynamic way and depending on the observer position, can be dominant in a moment and discrete the next one. Industrial building recovers that way, re-thought and reloaded, part of that which itself gave once to architecture: clarity and force.

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PROJECT NESTLÉ APLICATION GROUP QUERÉTARO
CONSTRUCTION 700 sq.meters
PROGRAM Laboratories, Offices, Auditorium, Tasting area
CLIENT NESTLÉ
DESIGN YEAR 2007
DATE OF COMPLETION 2009
ARCHITECTURAL PROJECT ROJKIND ARQUITECTOS
PRICIPAL IN CHARGE MICHEL ROJKIND
PROJECT LEADERS AGUSTÍN PEREYRA, PAULINA GOYCOOLEA
PROJECT TEAM MORITZ MELCHERT, TERE LEVY, ISAAC SMEKE, TOMAS KRISTOF, FRANCISCO GORDILLO, ANDRÉS ALTESOR, JUAN PABLO ESPINOSA
3D MASSING JUAN CARLOS VIDALS
LANDSCAPE ROJKIND ARQUITECTOS
FINAL PHOTOS ©Paúl Rivera/archphoto.com
CONSTRUCTION PHOTOS ROJKIND ARQUITECTOS
NESTLÉ SUPERVISION FLAVIO GUERRERO, CRISTIAN MORENO.
CONSTRUCTION SLCI ENGINEER JOSE SOLIS
FACADE ENGINEERING VYCISA [JUAN PABLO CASILLAS, CYBELLE HERNÁNDEZ.]
STRUCTURAL ENGINEER JUAN FELIPE HEREDIA
M.E.P. QUANTUM DESIGN
FURNITURE ESRAWE DISEÑO / ARNE QUINZE
CARPETS INTERFACE

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More Dezeen stories about Rojkind Arquitectos:

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New Tamayo Museum with BIG

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Nestlé Chocolate Museum

  • http://www.session23design.com Michael

    Makes the Very Best Booleans

  • teabag

    i was just going to say the same….someone really loves booleans…

  • Tyler

    I love this, I wonder though, if your eyes would hurt after working in that orange room all day?

  • gaque

    these guys are great. why would they ever team up with big…???

  • Kris Adams

    What a headache to look at.

  • rodger

    ha ha, funny project.
    i like it a lot.

  • St

    Bite it!

  • http://jjohnson.carbonmade.com Jeremiah

    I love the playful juxtaposition of the bright, curved interiors with the stark, gridded exterior. Proof that industrial architecture need not be so industrial.

  • DB

    All that orange would definitely give me a headache. I’d probably boycott Butterfinger if I had to be surrounded by its orange all day.

  • http://www.planet3studios.com kanwal

    Rojkind are official architects for the nestle group , i guess….well done with this one….

  • Luis Dias

    Someone here is confusing “booleans” with plain ol fashioned spheres.

    Just sayin.

  • Luis Dias

    … Which by the way makes all the lines be simple arcs…

  • ZED

    It is wonderful to see how rich complexity can come from such a simple operation. (Applause!)

  • Josh

    I like this project, but it reminds me of the movie “Terminator” when they pass through time and their sphere booleans everything around them.

  • http://www.winifredwikkeling.com/blog royal creme

    A compelling and fresh way to fulfill the UNESCO requirements. That turned out to be the very bit of guidance the project needed.

  • estudante

    reminding me of Gordon Matta -Clark

  • http://www.trendsnow.net Prof. Z

    Gordon Matta -Clark?

  • http://www.michaelschoner.de michael

    love it!
    especially the stair going through the spehere surface!

  • http://archicad.com.hr Marin

    I love orange and I love RA architecture! :-)

  • http://www.buro-gds.com zhao

    reminds me of Toyo Ito + Richard Meyers + Joseph Albers
    http://blog.buro-gds.com/2009/05/rojkind-arquitectos-nestle-application.html

  • maKING OF

    great concept, why not cut out the ground too ????? at least at one corner, please, u know like in TERMINATOR just bigger

  • F.Saster

    Its interesting to see this building, but there are question i like to ask, why is the researchers lab space colour orange?! i use to tought that research lab is super white and looks sterilize..

  • Daniel from Ireland

    Michel, you did it again and such a wonderfully exciting and imaginative way to interpret traditional porticos, absolutely without compromise!!!!! I love it!!

  • Pierre Sinsua

    soothing atmosphere, very relaxing

  • ahmad alsheikh syria

    nice nice