House of Stone by John Pawson

| 12 comments

Milan 2010: British architect John Pawson exhibited a pavilion made of stone in Milan last month.

Called House of Stone, the structure features a gap cut across its centre and is made entirely of a recycled material, consisting of scrap stone and natural resin.

Low energy LED lights illuminate the structure at night and highlight the texture of the stone.

Recesses in the interior conceal the lighting system.

Here's some more information about the project:


British architect John Pawson in collaboration with Salvatori and lighting specialists KKDC exhibited at the celebrated Think Tank Exhibition, Milan. The installation entitled ‘House of Stone’ was a simple, house shaped architectural structure made from recycled stone, cut with meticulous accuracy.

KKDC lighting specialists provided a strikingly innovative MoMo LED light source to illuminate the construction at night, turning the cuts into brilliant beams while highlighting the texture of the stone and minimal architecture. The house was made entirely from recycled material made from a stone residue formulated by market leaders Salvatori, consisting of 99% stone scrap and just 1% natural resin to act as a bonding agent.

About the project: House of Stone

“Seen from the colonnade the installation was a simple house shaped architectural structure” explains world renowned British architect John Pawson. A construction that is at once both straightforward and appealing, creating constant contrasts and juxtapositions of ethereality and substance, lights, shadows and surfaces. Pawson adds, “Cut with meticulous accuracy the planes in dark stone convey a sense of essentiality and precision.”

Central to the installation layout was the strikingly innovative linear MoMo LED lighting product by KKDC. Slits on the edges and the central section of the construction allowed light in the walls protect, while the cracks breakdown the sense of intimacy and closure as well as providing a source of illumination. At night the linear MoMo LED lights inside the house turned these cuts into brilliant beams.

The linear MoMo LED light source produced by lighting specialist KKDC has no visible lighting structure. It is carefully concealed providing a continuous linear lighting source throughout the space.

The consistent 2800k colour temperature is used to evenly light and emphasize the horizontal and vertical planes of the structure, while highlighting the texture of the stone material and minimal architectural form. The linear MoMo LED lights offer low energy consumption making it an environmentally friendly product.


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| 12 comments

Posted on Thursday, May 6th, 2010 at 4:06 pm by Catherine Warmann. See our copyright policy. Before commenting, please read our comments policy.

  • M-Boogie
  • yo

    “The linear MoMo LED lights offer low energy consumption making it an environmentally friendly product.”
    Sounds like some kind of excuse.
    An environmental friendly product should first of all be created to answer needs and not to exhibit esthetics.
    but hey its world renowned British architect John Pawson.

  • jet

    wow… a true master

  • asd

    i love the beautiful detailing with the sharp bands of light and shadow. well done

  • Jones

    yo:

    Get over it. The notion of anti-aesthetic environmentalism is a fundamentalist dead end that belongs in the last century. All products and buildings should aim to be as environmentally sustainable, up until the point where it compromises the design itself. If you stick to an attitude that dismisses anything that isn’t hardcore deep green, then you only serve to alienate the majority, rather than take them with you. Lighting’s function is first and foremost to exhibit aesthetics, otherwise what’s the point? Indeed, what’s the point in any design at all? LED lighting is the most environmentally sustainable type currently available (more so than compact fluorescent) so why be down on it just for looking a bit swish?

  • massatz

    M-Boogie:

    I thought the same the moment I saw it.

  • hayden

    Marry me John. (!)

  • http://www.replicahandbagscheap.com iv

    wow….i fell good!!!great house

  • martino

    why did he put such a heavy object in this courtyard? This type of courtyard has his own stucture, rhythm, … this is a very heavy intervention.. perhaps this should have been a lighter, removable structure… but who am I to criticize JP the great :)

  • Ash

    is that you Tadao Ando? I agree with martino – contextually this sucks. It should be standing on a clifftop/mountaintop…zzzz boring.

  • yo

    “Lighting’s function is first and foremost to exhibit aesthetics, otherwise what’s the point? ”
    Allowing people to see?
    And I m not talking anti aesthethic-I m talking useful and therefore aesthethically pleasant.
    I consider eaesthetics to be a function but I m sorry this building is barely nice or interesting in the pictures, trying to imagine the feel of being there.

    “All products and buildings should aim to be as environmentally sustainable, up until the point where it compromises the design itself.”
    I agree on this one, it all depends on what one means with compromising the design. But what’s the final goal after all?

    Anyway thanks Jones for the answer.

  • zam

    Kerez called, he wants his concept back.