Cornell Boxes by Alison Smithson for Tecta

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German brand Tecta have put into production a series of storage boxes on sticks originally designed by the late British architect Alison Smithson in 1988.

Called Cornell Boxes, the open-fronted units have little shelves slotted into them and are sat atop an iron stand.

The collection also includes a smaller unit that sits on a turntable.

The boxes were launched at the Salone Internazionale del Mobile in Milan last month.

See all our stories about Milan 2010 in our special category.

Here's a tiny bit of text from London retailers Aram:


British architect Alison Smithson designed the Cornell Boxes in 1988. She was inspired by Joseph Cornell, the American artist who collected and carefully juxtaposed found objects in simple, usually glass-fronted boxes.

Cornell Boxes are now in production and were recently launched at the Salone del Mobile in Milan. They are made of lacquered wood on a nickel plated turntable base or black lacquered iron frames and measure 49 x 20 x 53h cm, 54 x 20 x 137h cm or 117 x 20 x 153h cm. In store in September, price from £513.50.


See also:

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Les French by
Studio Glithero
Down Side Up by
Fabrica
Unhidden by
Leon Li and Ryan Ran
| 5 comments

Posted on Tuesday, May 25th, 2010 at 3:23 pm by Catherine Warmann. See our copyright policy. Before commenting, please read our comments policy.

  • http://www.luisarrivillaga.com luis Arrivillaga

    very interesting, it looks elegant, but I don’t know if puting all together makes too much over a wall,

  • modular

    Birds always look nice on product pictures.

  • nicey

    surpising, from a brutalist architect. for me a bit twee-t.

  • Zee

    I absolutly love it, all of it.

    I miss design which was good because of its form and the feeling it gave to the viewer. Nowadays it all seems to be about the new materials and the new processes. The 3 units together actually moved me, I would love to have some.

  • tanya telford – T

    i don’t know so much about brutalist architecture but as an object i prefer the boxes and stand in the first picture, seems to engage my curiosity alot,