Dynasty Revival by Lane Crawford

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Dynasty Revival by Lane Crawford

Hong Kong department store Lane Crawford invited eight designers including Tom Dixon (above), Michael Young, Jaime Hayón and Ilse Crawford to revamp the Chinese ming-style chair for an exhibition currently on show at the ifc mall in Hong Kong.

Dynasty Revival by Lane Crawford

Above: Tom Dixon

Dynasty Revival, which celebrates 160 years of Lane Crawford, also includes designs from Fornasetti, Qu Guangci, Lisa Whatmough and D.B Kim.

Dynasty Revival by Lane Crawford

Above: Lisa Whatmough of Squint

Here's Lane Crawford's press release:


Celebrating its 160th anniversary this year, Lane Crawford Hong Kong is proud to launch Heritage 160 this Autumn/Winter 2010. Founded in 1850 by Thomas Ash Lane and Ninian Crawford, Lane Crawford has evolved to become a leading luxury specialty store offering a wide selection of international brands. To honour Lane Crawford’s rich history and unique past, as well as its strong relationships with top brands, designers and talents from around the world, Heritage 160 features a series of programmes and events this Autumn/Winter, culminating into the largest celebration of the year.

Dynasty Revival by Lane Crawford

Above: Michael Young

Focused on introducing Hong Kong to the best and most innovative in fashion, style and design from around the world, Lane Crawford has invited a group of creatives to ‘curate’ exclusive items in celebration of our anniversary. From one-of-a-kind customised trenches and art-inspired Ming Dynasty chairs to limited edition designer footwear and an exclusive capsule collection from the best new generation and contemporary designers.

Dynasty Revival by Lane Crawford

Above: Michael Young

To share these special limited edition and one-of-a-kind pieces, they will be showcased at an exclusive exhibition at Lane Crawford’s ifc mall flagship store in September 2010. The comprehensive project will incorporate a new multi-media platform including an interactive, world-contributed microsite, as well as an auction with proceeds benefiting UNICEF, the only UN organisation dedicated exclusively to children.

Dynasty Revival by Lane Crawford

Above: Jaime Hayón

DYNASTY REVIVAL

Honouring Lane Crawford’s rich history and roots, the antique Chinese Ming chair — traditionally reserved for people of power, strength and status in China — is given modern makeovers by creative design visionaries, Tom Dixon, Fornasetti, Guangci, Jaime Hayón, Ilse Crawford, D.B. Kim for Swarovski Crystal Palace, Squint and Michael Young, transforming the traditional chair into one-of-a- kind contemporary works of art.

Dynasty Revival by Lane Crawford

Above: Ilse Crawford

Barnaba Fornasetti

Applying Fornasetti’s neoclassical, collaged, and surreal style to the Ming Chair, the design blurs the line between classics and modern art, and at the same time, highlights the essence of both the Chinese and Western cultures. The distinctive and unique shape of the Ming Chair allows Fornasetti to get creative with lavish whimsical imagery, such as owls perch on the seat-back, a pair of buttocks cheekily rest on the seat, a sun radiates on the back, and butterflies all over the chair. The application of the meticulous trompe l’oeil technique further animates the chair to create a new identity, transforming something that belongs to a different culture into “something Fornasetti” without conflict.

Dynasty Revival by Lane Crawford

Above: Ilse Crawford

Qu Guangci

As a Chinese designer, Qu has a strong devotion and sense of belonging towards the Ming Chair. The Ming Chair is a representation of heritage and he believes heritage can be interpreted as a root of a tree. Regardless the circumstances, the roots of a tree are the key to its life. He poetically symbolises the piece as a Chinese folk tale, naming the chair “I Am A Tree” as an indication of his take on Chinese heritage and traditions. Qu aims to convey Chinese virtues in his designs with important values such as family bond, views on fortune, and appreciation of the nature. Known for his humorous and playful style, Qu adds bird figurines to the chair to further prove his statement, “I even want a flock of birds to think my chair as a tree”. Qu stands by his belief that humour can be found even in the most solemn event.

Dynasty Revival by Lane Crawford

D.B Kim of Swarovski Crystal Palace

Ilse Crawford

Refreshing an iconic chair without losing its identity and content is the key to Crawford’s Ming Chair. She treasures designs and furniture that are passed down from generation to generation. With a strong emphasis on fine craftsmanship, the chair is stripped to draw attention on the connections which are made with incredible skills without the use of nails. Crawford believes it is crucial to understand the essence of the chair, the history and ongoing story in order to further express it in a new way.

vDynasty Revival by Lane Crawford

D.B Kim of Swarovski Crystal Palace

Jaime Hayón

Famous for his playful yet functional style, Hayón manages to insert his identity to the Ming Chair. With a strong belief that heritage is a treasure inherited from the past to enrich the present, Hayón cherishes traditions. His intention of the design is to reinterpret and create something new without losing the Ming Chair’s initial and essential aesthetic. Rocking legs and an overlapping seat are integrated to the design. To put further emphasis on the Hayón’s characteristic; his signature colour, dark violet, is lacquered over the chair. The interesting combination gives an edgy and contemporary spin to the traditional Ming Chair.

Dynasty Revival by Lane Crawford

Above: Barnaba Fornasetti

Michael Young

Young believes that heritage holds the value of world together; it puts current surroundings into perspective and life becomes soulless without it. Standing by these values, Young applies the paper-folding technique, an ancient Chinese art, to the Ming Chair. As an appreciator of the Chinese culture, the finished piece undoubtedly represents the beauty within the Chinese culture - the Ming Chair and ancient paper-folding art as representations of the extensive culture and rich history in arts, and the handcrafting technique as a representation of the substantial manpower in China.

Dynasty Revival by Lane Crawford

Above: Barnaba Fornasetti

Squint, Lisa Whatmough

With a strong mindset of preserving and perpetuating old items, Whatmough revives the Ming Chair with Squint’s signature patchwork technique to create a new interpretation. With the aim to preserve its heritage, she selects woven English fabrics inspired by gentlemen’s silk ties to decorate the chair. A relatively muted palette is applied to ensure the colour does not overwhelm the linear shape of the chair. The finished piece fits perfectly with Squint’s vision to create unexpected one-of-a-kind pieces by reupholstering antique furniture with limelight-stealing patchworked fabrics.

Dynasty Revival by Lane Crawford

Above: Barnaba Fornasetti

D.B Kim

With an in-depth knowledge and background in Asian history, Kim relates the Ming Chair to its fundamental meaning in the Chinese culture, a symbol of superiority and throne. Kim reinforces the prestigious status of the chair by dazzling it with scattered precious Swarovski crystals. The aim is to present a simple design with a high level of attention, as if a spirit is given to the Ming Chair.

Dynasty Revival by Lane Crawford

Above: Qu Guangci of Guangci

Tom Dixon

“Chairs have been the passport to my progress in design”. Known for his basic but extremely modern and chic designs, Dixon has been an expert in chair industry. With a diverse perspective towards history and culture, Dixon believes heritage is the accumulated culture and history that makes each person unique; it is also one’s connection to the past. A

Dynasty Revival by Lane Crawford

Above: Qu Guangci of Guangci

s seen in his design, Dixon uses a fluorescent orange lacquer to modernise the chair without undermining the classic proportion, creating his own version of Ming Chair without losing its Chinese character. Dixon adores heritage and history, and at the same time, is a pioneer in the future and technology, the Ming Chair is a perfect example of his taking the historical bones and giving it a contemporary skin.

Dynasty Revival by Lane Crawford

Above: Qu Guangci of Guangci


See also:

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| 12 comments

Posted on Monday, September 13th, 2010 at 7:40 pm by Joe Mills. See our copyright policy. Before commenting, please read our comments policy.

  • cydewayz

    M Young vs J Hayon..

  • emmarosemetcalfe

    hmm more chairs.

  • J J C

    The first image looks like a very simple reapplication of the Louis Ghost concept of Philippe Starck for Kartell.

    Of course nearly all design takes influence from that before it, but somehow this instance to me seems like the designer has lazily recycled Starck's design idea, with little further development to make it his own.

    • J J C

      (I was talking about the expression of a traditional silhouette produced with more modern construction methods / materials / colours associated with modern design)

  • rocks & minerals

    yes, someone PLEASE revamp that ming style already – its looking so 400 years ago…

  • http://www.jingdaily.com Jing Daily

    Great images! While I would have liked to see Lane Crawford select a few Chinese contemporary artists in this project, the chairs are very unique and certainly portray the bridge between Chinese culture and international style that Lane Crawford was seeking. Artist collaborations are a great way to promote and specialize an occasion such as Lane Crawford's 160th year, or Lacoste's s Holiday Collector Series with Li Xiaofeng.

    • http://www.jingdaily.com Jing Daily

      * I meant selected more, as there is one Chinese artist included in the mix.

  • Legal Notice

    Looks like more trival design to me-why bother?

  • http://www.facebook.com/to.kinwa Noel To

    Jaime Hayón!!

  • http://bit.ly/DBext Laura

    I love the variety of styles and designs that were dreamed up with this theme.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=506629830 Times Pang

    Ilse Crawford the winner, she's the only one knows how to not destroy the chair.

  • alonealongalong

    I simply dont think the chairs successed.
    The beauty of Ming Chairs are destroyed.
    bad cross over.