Fővám tér by Spora Architects

| 19 comments

Fővám tér by Spora Architects

This underground railway station with criss-crossing concrete beams is by Hungarian firm Spora Architects and currently under construction in Budapest.

Fővám tér by Spora Architects

Fővám tér forms part of a new metro line, comprising 10 stations, that will connect south Buda with the city centre.

Fővám tér by Spora Architects

Three levels of reinforced concrete beams rise up through a void above the platforms.

Fővám tér by Spora Architects

At ground level a new square will be created with large glazed areas to admit natural light down into the station.

All photographs are by Tamás Bujnovszky.

All photographs are by Tamás Bujnovszky.

Fővám tér by Spora Architects

Here's some more from the architects:


“Fővám tér” - UNDERGROUND STATION BUDAPEST, HUNGARY

The new metro line planned in Budapest is to connect South-Buda with the city center. 10 stations will be constructed in the first step. Fővám tér station is on the left side of the Danube river.

Fővám tér by Spora Architects

"Fővám tér" station is a twin station of the Szent Gellért tér, similarily with a complex stucture composed of a cut-and-cover box and tunnels.

Fővám tér by Spora Architects

The complexity of the structure is even greater, since here a new tunnel for the tramline and a new pedestrian subway has to be constructed, as well. Having the new underground station, Fővám tér will become a new gateway of the historic downtown of Pest.

Fővám tér by Spora Architects

The boxes are supported by three levels of reinforced concrete beams, the structure of which will be similar to a net.

Fővám tér by Spora Architects

There are three layers of this network, which keep the walls of the box like a bone-structure.The design of the box is determined by this sight of concrete net-structure.

Fővám tér by Spora Architects

Due to the construction technology, huge rooms have been created in the inner spaces of the stations. The section of the space is proportional to cross section of average street in Pest , built in the eclectic period in the 19th century, so the station can be interpreted as a inverse street or square under the surface.

Fővám tér by Spora Architects

Playing on natural light has been an important aspect in the architectural formation of the entire line.

Fővám tér by Spora Architects

The main goal is –apart from giving enough light of course- to attend on the interior design and show the architectural forming as much as possible. On the surface of Fővám tér a huge square will be created without traffic.

Fővám tér by Spora Architects

This will allow of locating glassy, crystalloid skylights, which will let the sunlight reach the platform level, emphasizing the unique character of the beam network.

Fővám tér by Spora Architects

Project credits:
Project: M4 metro line SZT.GELLÉRT TÉR, FŐVÁM TÉR UNDERGROUND STATIONS, BUDAPEST
Location: center of Budapest, Quay of River Danube, Hungary
Client: BKV Rt. DBR Metró Projekt Igazgatóság (Budapest Transport Ltd. DBR Metro Project Directory)
Year designed: 2005
Year built: 2007-2011
Status: under construction
Budget: cca. 20 million Euro/ stationvolume: 7100m2/

Fővám tér by Spora Architects

Stationdesign: sporaarchitects Ltd. – Tibor Dékány, Sándor Finta, Ádám Hatvani, Orsolya Vadászteam: Zsuzsa Balogh, Attilla Korompay, Bence Várhidi
General design: Palatium Stúdió Kft. -Zoltán Erő, Balázs Csapó
Construction, installations: consortium of Főmterv, Uvaterv, Mott-Macdonald
Aplied art: Tamás Komoróczky
Photo: Tamás Bujnovszky

Fővám tér by Spora Architects

Click above for larger image

Fővám tér by Spora Architects

Click above for larger image


See also:

.

National Stadium, Beijing
by Herzog & de Meuron
Conceptual extension
by Axis Mundi
More
architecture stories
  • Rob van Veggel

    Piranesi's Carceri!

  • nonplussed

    We can't all be Herzog & de Meuron, or can we?

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=621521557 Poul Anderson

    The layering is vey dramatic.

  • hovaard

    i dig this but, then again, i love breton brut which is being attacked (again). as is corbu.

  • http://twitter.com/bartonsmith @bartonsmith

    "The main goal is –apart from giving enough light of course- to attend on the interior design and show the architectural forming as much as possible."

    Can somebody please shed some light (no pun intended) on this statement? Or am I reading it correctly in that the only "function" per se is to allow light down onto the platform? If this was the goal, is that the most efficient solution?

    Looks nice in some of the images and will create interesting shadows for sure, but I can't help but think how aged it will look in a few years after water leaks and attacks from shameless pigeons.

  • http://www.andymatthewsphotography.com Andy

    Incredible photos!

    Hope all that concrete is still visible when complete. Looks like it could be an incredible space.

  • http://individual.cl/ æon

    I remember some computer 3D games with scenarios very similar to the ones in the photos.

  • dafin

    very nice, neighbours..sci-fi, a little bit creepy, yet spectacular, different, good quality..i like it. a romanian

  • Nathan

    This totally reminds me of something Daniel Libeskind would design.

  • http://twitter.com/Ikumadness @Ikumadness

    It makes me feel calm. kinda sci-fi look but still organic shape reminds me of veins of a leaf. very nice.

  • john

    not even a little bit so good as herzog de meuron!!!

  • syd

    I feel trapped looking at the photos, get me outta there.

  • http://www.archicadbimcenter.com Enrique

    Interestingly the concept of speed and crossing of lines in different directions and avenues of a city street intersections

  • Bashar Al Shawa

    I dont really get why there are 3 levels of reinforced concrete beams, who by looking at the pictures, support nothing but themselves. I get the idea that it is "nice" to show the structure and materials as they are in modern architecture, but this one seems to be "creating" structure out of the blue just to show it. How about they leave all the scaffolding there as well?

  • http://areyouanevilgenius.blogspot.com evilgenius

    "The main goal is –apart from giving enough light of course- to attend on the interior design and show the architectural forming as much as possible."

    If the beams doubled as walkways connecting you to adjoining areas of the station or rooms or such, that might be interesting. But they look a lot like just massive beams purely for the sake of decoration. What a waste, I say, a very expensive and feeble attempt to copy the look of Herzog and de Meuron without any understanding of its purpose and function.

    It's very pretty but if designers are just about making pretty useless forms on top of not so interesting platforms then what good are we?

  • PBen

    I've been down there. It is amazing.
    All the beams are under pressure, not for decoration.

  • Bruce William

    Could use a face-lift. Something like this maybe?- http://www.commonwealth-projects.com/projects/par

  • kariBUP

    reminds me of a creepy dream… love the utilitarian look, almost soviet in nature. would love to see the finished product.

  • https://www.facebook.com/kristof.tihanyi Tihanyi Kristóf

    The beams support the structure (which is basically a big underground box) against the huge horizontal forces. Without them the box would collapse. It's definitely not useless, nor for the sake of the interior design. It's a very nice fusion of architectural and structural design.