Snake&Molting legwear by Camille Cortet

| 8 comments

Snake&Molting legwear by Camille Cortet

Amsterdam designer Camille Cortet created these snake-like leggings by cutting triangular apertures into the fabric.

Snake&Molting legwear by Camille Cortet

Called Snake&Molting, the pattern changes as the wearer moves and the holes expand and contract.

Snake&Molting legwear by Camille Cortet

Above photograph is by Vincent van Gurp.

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Snake&Molting legwear by Camille Cortet

The information below is from Camille Cortet:


This project is part of the Transformations project.

By observing animal transformations we understand animals’ behaviours that we can connect with and that we would like to have from them. These animal behaviours are inspirations for our own transformations.

Snake&Molting legwear by Camille Cortet

The Transformations body-ornaments are about adapting animals’ behaviours to our culture. It is a way to create new gestures and new body languages within clothing and ornaments. Camille Cortet translates the animal’s beauty and finally merge with its behaviour, almost to the point of embodying it.

Snake&molting legwear

Our skin ages through cycles of molt that we can’t notice whereas snakes have to go through exhausting stages in order to escape from their skin that becomes too old and too tigh. This behaviour and experience are translated in a body ornament.

Snake&Molting legwear by Camille Cortet

The tights are becoming a second skin, made of a laser cut textile, they become textured with the shape of the body. The second skins evolves with our movements. It ages and breaks as a skin after several uses.


See also:

.

Plaited stockings
by Royal Extreme
Billboard bags
by Artecnica
Air Vase by
Torafu Architects
| 8 comments

Posted on Thursday, December 2nd, 2010 at 12:12 pm by . See our copyright policy. Before commenting, please read our comments policy.

  • Lise

    Gorgeous project, with innovative use of materials! Fashion-y but still pretty wearable, i hope they're available for sale soon?
    Nice photography too.

  • fivedollarshake

    yes,sounds promising,but what material did they use?? ..

  • http://areyouanevilgenius.blogspot.com evilgenius

    really cool, fresh idea! i like that it's a twist on wearing say, snake skin, instead, wearing a skin like a snake skin. really really neat.

  • azikang

    I've seen very similar project in Design Academy Eindhoven's graduation exhibition in this year. It's really looks same…

    • DYhead

      This was this actual project, the designer is from the Design Academy Eindhoven.
      One of the picture is in the catalogue of the academy ! well spotted !

  • http://www.francoisbeydoun.com Frenchy1st

    Artistic and intellectual at the same time, well done!

  • kim

    Parametric architecture and morpho-architecture for fashion industry. Nothing new (using laser cutting, nesting software,+ scripting…), but always so beautiful…Another proof of something big emerging since 15 years across manufacturing industries, and still dismiss by the majority of architects.
    We are becoming obsolete by holding to some old thinkings……..

    • Judith Geld

      True, a parametric approach to design would be nothing new.

      But this is NOT parametric. Using laser cutting is not parametric design. Creating parameters for generative and variable patterns is. I don't see that here. What is generative or variable about it? All I see here is, "I created a pattern that looks like snake skin and can come apart."

      But nor is it biomimetic design. A snack skin would renew itself; this design does not. The structures and patterns of a snake skin are, the way they are, to increasing the snake's motion and digestive functions; this design does not do this.

      So what is it then? Anything more than making "artistic" gestures which copy natural aesthetics and uses digital technologies to produce them?

      Now, here's an example of REAL parametric fashion design: Ying Gao's practice based in Montreal. You can see a clip here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SzdjjfPZeQw. Its a shame Ying Gao's work is not the counterpunch of this article, and that design writers and publishers don't provide readers with this kind of comparative view.