Restaurant at the Royal Academy
by Tom Dixon

| 3 comments

New Royal Academy Restaurant by Tom Dixon

British designer Tom Dixon has completed the interior of the new restaurant at the Royal Academy of Arts in London.

New Royal Academy Restaurant by Design Research Studio

Created for restauranteur Oliver Peyton of Peyton & Byrne, the dining area features a free-standing metal-framed glass unit to house sculptures that were previously hidden away in the Academy's archives.

New Royal Academy Restaurant by Design Research Studio

A bar made of lava stone and handmade bricks lines one end of the room, while the dining area has been divided into zones each inspired by an architect or artist key to the Academy's history, including John Soane and J.M.W Turner.

New Royal Academy Restaurant by Design Research Studio

Furniture and lighting designed by Dixon also features, including a new range of chairs and the perforated Etch lamps (see our earlier story), which hang in clusters.

New Royal Academy Restaurant by Design Research Studio

Dixon oversaw the project as creative director of interior design firm Design Research Studio.

New Royal Academy Restaurant by Design Research Studio

More projects by Tom Dixon ¬Ľ
More restaurants/bars on Dezeen ¬Ľ

New Royal Academy Restaurant by Design Research Studio

Here's some more information from Design Research Studio:


Interior design practice, Design Research Studio, under the direction of British designer Tom Dixon, are creating the interior for the new restaurant at the Royal Academy of Arts. This is the latest project for renowned restaurateur Oliver Peyton of Peyton and Byrne. The 150 cover restaurant will open to the public 18th January 2011.

The 250 m2 refurbishment references the long and illustrious history of the Royal Academy of Arts with materials chosen to complement the existing fabric of the Regency building including marble, brass and velvet.

The dining area is divided into different zones, with each area inspired by the work of a different Royal Academy Great such as Turner and Sir John Soane. To extend the gallery experience for diners, Design Research Studio has designed a dramatic free-standing unit in the centre of the space. Consisting of a number of glass cubes, the structure will house an extraordinary selection of sculptures and busts dating back to 1897. The pieces belong to the Royal Academy of Arts permanent collection but have long been stored out of public view.

The new bar is set to be a key focal point in the restaurant made from Mount Etna lava stone and hand-made glazed brick. Designed as a robust, sculptural object, its grandeur is enhanced by a dramatic cast glass chandelier suspended above. Other interior highlights include digitally etched brass pendant lights and injection-moulded foam seating.


See also:

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Paramount by
Design Research Studio
Shoreditch House by
Design Research Studio
Flash Factory by
Tom Dixon
  • eyeontheworld

    We can note from the above that the curse of the, "accessorized overkill" can affect even the recognised flag bearers of British designers. I wonder if this highlights the continued pressure, and its consequential creative drain, placed upon the shoulders of the repetitively commissioned, peer appointed elite.

    • Jimble

      Well said and I concur – finally some well considered comment on this blog.

      Why does Tom Dixon and Design Research Studio feel that this space suits only his products? The pendant lamps for example do not fit in with his other furniture or the space – angled geometrical forms against arched and curved forms.

      The space is amazing, but as a complete designed interior a fair proportion of it clashes.

      Please can we get out of the habit of product/furniture (and in most cases 'celebrity') designers feeling they can put there hand to all aspects of design. Leave the interiors to Interior Designers and let the Interior Designers not be pressured by a brand to only consider using their products.

  • Marianne

    It makes me think about that (The American Restaurant by Warren Platner) : http://bingbangpouf.wordpress.com/2010/11/20/the-