House in Ise by Takashi Yamaguchi & Associates

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House in Ise by Takashi Yamaguchi and Associates

Japanese architecture firm Takashi Yamaguchi & Associates have completed this house in Ise, Mie Prefecture, Japan.

House in Ise by Takashi Yamaguchi and Associates

The project comprises two adjacent volumes with inclined roofs, connected by a central atrium.

House in Ise by Takashi Yamaguchi and Associates

Large glazed walls inside the house frame views of the surrounding landscape.

House in Ise by Takashi Yamaguchi and Associates

Living spaces are arranges round the atrium, while a bedroom and family room on the second floor  lead out onto a roof terrace.

House in Ise by Takashi Yamaguchi and Associates

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House in Ise by Takashi Yamaguchi and Associates

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House in Ise by Takashi Yamaguchi and Associates

Here's some more information from the architects:


House in Ise

The building is located on high ground with lush greenery and a bluff that overlooks the beautiful Miyagawa-River flowing north-south through Ise City.

House in Ise by Takashi Yamaguchi and Associates

The Intention was to create a rich relationship between the house and these surroundings.

House in Ise by Takashi Yamaguchi and Associates

The building is composed of two volumes arranged in parallel.

House in Ise by Takashi Yamaguchi and Associates

A vertical void links the rooftop terrace and the light court on the first floor, drawing nature into the interior.

House in Ise by Takashi Yamaguchi and Associates

On the first floor, a horizontal void connected directly to the vertical one opens up a view of Miyagawa River.

House in Ise by Takashi Yamaguchi and Associates

The interaction of these external voids - the way they intersect and connect with interior spaces - generates richer, more complex scenery throughout the building as a whole.

House in Ise by Takashi Yamaguchi and Associates

Rooms are arranged around the light court, which extends into the entrance such that Miyagawa River bursts into view when the door is opened.

House in Ise by Takashi Yamaguchi and Associates

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The eastern volume's first floor contains the living, dining and kitchen areas central to everyday life.

House in Ise by Takashi Yamaguchi and Associates

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The large opening dug from its northern end offers dramatic views of Ise and Miyagawa.

House in Ise by Takashi Yamaguchi and Associates

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The aluminum flooring's dull sheen gently amplifies the illumination from the light court and reflects a variety of natural transitions onto the white interior.

House in Ise by Takashi Yamaguchi and Associates

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The second floor contains family space and a bedroom in an enclosed area with a sloped ceiling.

House in Ise by Takashi Yamaguchi and Associates

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Milky-white natural light entering through slits in the roof wraps the interior in a soft, subdued atmosphere.

House in Ise by Takashi Yamaguchi and Associates

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The western volume's first floor contains the garage and a study.

House in Ise by Takashi Yamaguchi and Associates

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The long, relatively low opening in the study enables eyes weary from reading to rest with a view of the abundant greenery outside.

House in Ise by Takashi Yamaguchi and Associates

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The rooftop terrace and light court are open to Miyagawa area's natural scenery and afford excellent vantage points for the summer fireworks festival.

House in Ise by Takashi Yamaguchi and Associates

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The building's white exterior walls both reflect the fresh green of spring and catch the shadows cast by bare branches under the setting sun of late autumn.

House in Ise by Takashi Yamaguchi and Associates

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Such changing scenery is sure to create precious memories for the family that calls this house home.

House in Ise by Takashi Yamaguchi and Associates

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See also:

.

63.02° house by Schemata Architecture Office Usuki House by
Tonoma
Double House by
Tsuyoshi Kawata
  • http://www.dissign.com www.dissign.com

    japan always had a different point of view… I like it.

  • A one

    ok, so the kitchen is dark, the working table is dark and small space, but corridors have a lot of light… very original, to say the least

    • srle

      LOL! perhaps you missed the huge window and the center light well either side of the kitchen!? also, from the plan you can see the study is not small and the lack of direct sunlight in the computer space is actually ideal re screen reflections.

  • Marianne

    Like the big glass walls, the plans and the shape (last picture, wow), but the general feeling is a bit boring… I love white… but in this case, it's totaly lifeless. Maybe it's the grey pebble dead court ?
    http://bingbangpouf.wordpress.com/

  • http://www.terryculver.com.au Terry

    As an ardent Minimalist I love the simplicity and bareness and would love to try and keep my environment that sparse. However I have a feeling the place has just a few pieces of furniture added for scale and the house isn't fully lived in yet. I prefer to see a house devoid of the clutter of everyday life in order to appreciate the angles, volume and line etc. I guess I prefer to see the 'architecture' as opposed to the 'interior design'.

  • Architecturized

    Super clean! Would be cool if it had a secret basement studio too. What is the house constructed from? Would be good to know a bit about the construction techniques.

  • mcmlxix

    When I saw the frontal façade, I said to myself…I’m not going to like this. It’s good to be surprised. The organization of interior space is intuitive, yet I’m still baffled why the Japanese like their bathrooms either by the front door or in full view. If it works for them, I guess I won’t complain.

    What would I have done differently? I think the volume of the stairs that intrudes upon the living room is oppressive. I would have liked to have seen suspended treads.

    What would I do if I lived there? The atrium without doubt needs greenery…an appropriately large sized sculptural cypress perhaps. The pebbles would also lend more interest if they varied in size and color.

    I’d also paint the garage and front doors black, as well as the smaller volume separating the two larger volumes. Sacrilege? The former would give depth, and the latter would give the impression of two unconnected volumes.

    These things would add a counterpoint to the whiteness of it all without breaking the concept.

  • Guy

    Architecture so fresh and clean you could brush your teeth with it. That's a compliment.