House in Nasu by Kazunori Fujimoto Architect
& Associates

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House in Nasu by Kazunori Fujimoto

Japanese studio Kazunori Fujimoto Architect & Associates have completed a weekend house in Nasu, Tochigi Prefecture, Japan, where two gabled structures are separated by a walled courtyard.

House in Nasu by Kazunori Fujimoto

The house is divided into two parts with a double-height open-plan room on one side of the courtyard, and the bathroom and storage space on the other.

House in Nasu by Kazunori Fujimoto

The bedroom, kitchen and dining room are all in one room, with a free-standing wall creating a partition.

House in Nasu by Kazunori Fujimoto

Photographs are by Kazunori Fujimoto.

House in Nasu by Kazunori Fujimoto

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House in Nasu by Kazunori Fujimoto

Here's some more information from the architect:


House in Nasu

This is a weekend house built in the area height of above sea level 550m, in Nasu-town, Tochigi Prefecture.

House in Nasu by Kazunori Fujimoto

Though in the resort town, the road and the neighbor houses are near by the site, and it seems difficult to keep a privacy.

House in Nasu by Kazunori Fujimoto

So we aimed to make an indoor space like a Scandinavian soft interiors instead of the room open directly to the outside .

House in Nasu by Kazunori Fujimoto

The surrounding's tall trees blur the outline of the house, and the interior, they give the abstract light, shade, and many of colors.

House in Nasu by Kazunori Fujimoto

It is one-room space that has two big windows and a concrete wall.

House in Nasu by Kazunori Fujimoto

By the two windows the room connected to the outside environment.

House in Nasu by Kazunori Fujimoto

Closing the white curtains, all symbols as "house" are hidden, and the color and materials that can be seen are limited, still more, the abstract space is filled calm atmosphere.

House in Nasu by Kazunori Fujimoto

The inside concrete wall like "monolith" divide the space generously, and put the life in order.

House in Nasu by Kazunori Fujimoto

Location: Nasu, Tochigi, Japan
Main use: weekend house

House in Nasu by Kazunori Fujimoto

Site area: 504m2
House in Nasu by Kazunori Fujimoto

Building area: 85.44m2

House in Nasu by Kazunori Fujimoto

Total floor area: 85.44m2

House in Nasu by Kazunori Fujimoto

Click for larger image

Design term: 2009

House in Nasu by Kazunori Fujimoto

Construction term: 2010

House in Nasu by Kazunori Fujimoto


See also:

.

House in Sunami by
Kazunori Fujimoto
House in Koamicho by
Suppose Design Office
House in Ise by Takashi Yamaguchi & Associates
  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Zafar-Tashmukhamedov/100000846182818 Zafar Tashmukhamedov

    well done work! too simple and too usefull but seems too cold~

  • Oliver

    cold and uninviting architecture – not somewhere I could ever imagine spending my weekends.

  • Hercule Poirot

    I have seen russian prisons with more intimacy and warmth.

  • http://www.facebook.com/ganea.adrian Ganea Adrian

    Incredible! I love this with all my heart! And that wall inside the house is absolutley perfect!

  • Kim Nguyen Ngoc

    Minimal as the ultimate ornment. This is a week end house for a family of monk samurai or ninja priests. It could be in a bubble shape of concrete, it would be the same.

  • edward

    One could imply an occupant whose weekday life is immersed in a roiling culture
    of urban Japan. In which case the design makes perfect sense. Excellent!

  • julien

    White washed walls and raw concrete can be beautiful but they are not a project by themselves. An awkwardly furnished open plan, and an exterior that looks suburban and overly large for what it holds. This project is utterly uninteresting except for the question: who is this house built for? Is it for a couple? If so, why are there two single beds? Is this the ultimate getaway for the dysfunctional couple, where they can both sit at the dinner table in silence, in an empty room, water dripping somewhere in the distance…..

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Ines-Santos/100001018093398 Ines Santos

    how does one do a concrete roof like this?
    what do you do about impermeabilization and insulation?

  • Grapes

    sadly it does remind me of a concentration camp, And i would not want to live in one of those.

  • sam

    I absolutely love this building! I’m currently working on a project in university. I am designing a concrete staircase, but like to attach it to a free standing non-load-bearing wall. Is this possible? And if so how? :s

    Thank you!