Faculty of Business Studies of Mondragon
University by Hoz Fontan Arquitectos

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Faculty of Business studies of Mondragon University by Hoz Fontan Arquitectos

Spanish firm Hoz Fontan Arquitectos have completed a new Faculty of Business Studies at Mondragon University in Oñati, Spain.

Faculty of Business studies of Mondragon University by Hoz Fontan Arquitectos

The glazed building comprises classrooms, administrative offices, a hall and library.

Faculty of Business studies of Mondragon University by Hoz Fontan Arquitectos

The library and hall are raised up to afford views over the surrounding area, cantilevering out from the main building.

Faculty of Business studies of Mondragon University by Hoz Fontan  Arquitectos

More buildings for education on Dezeen »

Faculty of Business studies of Mondragon University by Hoz Fontan   Arquitectos

Photographs are by José Hevia.

Faculty of Business studies of Mondragon University by Hoz Fontan Arquitectos

Here are some more details from the architects:


The university required a space in which to impart regulated and continuous education, lodge the administration's office, a library and the assembly room.

Faculty of Business studies of Mondragon University by Hoz Fontan Arquitectos

The building meets all these requirements divided in four volumes.

Faculty of Business studies of Mondragon University by Hoz Fontan Arquitectos

The first three volumes are destined to hold the educational and administration sections, and are formed with specific characteristics for the development of its activities; it is in contact with the ground and organized in such way that can function autonomously.

Faculty of Business studies of Mondragon University by Hoz Fontan Arquitectos

Nevertheless, the fourth volume is the one that best represents the building's identity.

Faculty of Business studies of Mondragon University by Hoz Fontan Arquitectos

The library, the assembly hall and the teaching staff's offices are arranged in a lifted volume that allows having view-points on the trees that surround the building, capturing a general view of Oñati.

Faculty of Business studies of Mondragon University by Hoz Fontan Arquitectos

This lifting creates a great porch entry to the building and at the same time a generous hall, constituting both of them the building's main relational areas. Areas that, seen as public squares and watchtowers from which admire the scenery, will allow the connection between students and surrounding environment, acting the university not only as knowledge media, but also as a mediation support between local culture, natural landscape and university life.

Faculty of Business studies of Mondragon University by Hoz Fontan Arquitectos

Faculty of Business studies of Mondragon University by Hoz Fontan Arquitectos

Faculty of Business studies of Mondragon University by Hoz Fontan Arquitectos

Faculty of Business studies of Mondragon University by Hoz Fontan Arquitectos

Faculty of Business studies of Mondragon University by Hoz Fontan Arquitectos

Faculty of Business studies of Mondragon University by Hoz Fontan Arquitectos

Faculty of Business studies of Mondragon University by Hoz Fontan Arquitectos

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Credits:

Location: Ibarra, Oñati
Architecture: Hoz Fontan Arquitectos
Project directors: Angel de la Hoz, Cristina Fontán, Pablo de la Hoz
Executive project and construction management: LKS, Hoz Fontán Arquitectos
Collaborators: Marta Porroy


See also:

.

Haifa University Centre
by Chyutin Architects
PKU University of Law
by Kokaistudios
Biotechnological Park Building
by Tatiana Bilbao
  • http://www.facebook.com/kingtoon Toon Kantharoup

    I really like the feeling. Clean, simple, and very fresh

  • mvb

    Sendai methiateque 2.0

    • filip

      Where do you see similarity?

      • ryan

        thats exactly what i thought! :)
        open concept space / b+w stripes on ceiling / tubes around vertical circulations…
        i'm not saying it's bad though.

  • pielasia

    i like it! so light !

  • Danillo

    @ mvb:
    That's immediately what came to my mind – Toyo Ito's seaweed-esque structure, especially in images 5, 9, 10. It's a good precedent to use, and it was well done…