Inside Out by Takeshi Hosaka Architects

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Inside Out by Takeshi Hosaka Architects

Rain falls inside parts of this house in Tokyo by Japanse studio Takeshi Hosaka Architects.

Inside Out by Takeshi Hosaka Architects

Called Inside Out, the home for a couple and two cats has an enclosed core of bedrooms and living rooms, surrounded by an outer shell with a quadrilateral plan.

Inside Out by Takeshi Hosaka Architects

Apertures in the outside allow rain, wind and light into the space between the two structures.

Inside Out by Takeshi Hosaka Architects

The inner building can be opened up further by sliding back glass panels.

Inside Out by Takeshi Hosaka Architects

More Japanese houses on Dezeen »

The details that follow are from the architects:


INSIDE OUT

This is a project of a house for a married couple and two cats, located in Tokyo.

Inside Out by Takeshi Hosaka Architects

The project had started based on the idea that humans and cats live in a same house, rather than cats living in a house designed for humans — and finally this idea brought out a concept: “a house inside which you feel being outside.”

Inside Out by Takeshi Hosaka Architects

The shape of the building was decided as an irregular quadrangle in accordance with the irregularly-shaped quadrangular site. The roof and wall sides of the volume have carefully designed openings, through which light, wind or rain could enter into the building.

Inside Out by Takeshi Hosaka Architects

Plants are planted in the ground under the roof opening which allows rain to enter in. The boxes for bedroom and for bathroom are put in the outer volume; and a living room is located above the bedroom box and a deck above the bathroom box.

Inside Out by Takeshi Hosaka Architects

Inside the volume, there is a space in which you would feel yourself being outside: Light, wind or rain could enter in, so that your way of living depends on the weather; but in this house, you would always positively seek to find another images of life.

Inside Out by Takeshi Hosaka Architects

Areas on the floor on which rain falls vary according to the wind direction, so you would seek to find the area where you don’t get wet. As you live longer, you would find out, from your experiences, various things about the relation between the extent to which rain enters in on the one hand, and the location of objects, furniture and yourself on the other. And, there is no air-conditioner in this house.

Inside Out by Takeshi Hosaka Architects

During intermediate seasons or summer, both humans and cats live in natural draft, or, in the other words, they live in the air environment which is almost same as the outside. On windy or chilly days, you could stay in the indoor boxes or the living room with glass sliding doors closed.

Inside Out by Takeshi Hosaka Architects

Figures and other many items which had been collected are located not only indoors, but many of which are also put on the outdoor shelves to the extent that it is possible. Cats walk on the thin line on which rain doesn’t fall and find places in the sun to take a nap.

Inside Out by Takeshi Hosaka Architects

The couple stay in the living room upstairs with glass doors open, sometimes even on rainy days; they often live a life in which they feel themselves being outside even while being inside.

Inside Out by Takeshi Hosaka Architects

People living in the modern era attempt in the modern way to reduce energy consumption and to coexist with nature — this is also a positive attempt to find what ways of life are possible beyond energy problems and this, in turn, beyond way of life, leading to the important themes about human mental activities.

Inside Out by Takeshi Hosaka Architects

The couple and cats who had lived in an apartment are now pioneering the new images of life every day in the weather-dependent house inside which they feel being outside.

Inside Out by Takeshi Hosaka Architects

INSIDE OUT
Architect: Takeshi Hosaka
Structural Engineers: Hirofumi Ohno

Inside Out by Takeshi Hosaka Architects

Photographer: Koji Fujii / Nacasa&Pertners Inc.
Client: Masayoshi & Yoko Matumoto

Inside Out by Takeshi Hosaka Architects

Name of the project: INSIDE OUT
Exact definition of the building: a couple and two cats
Location of the project: Kastushika-ku , Tokyo , Japan

Inside Out by Takeshi Hosaka Architects

Construction: wooden-structure
Site: 149.59 m2
Building area: 59.23 m2
Floor area ratio: 91.15 m2
Building height: 5859 mm
No. of floors: 2
Building function: House
Planning data
Design: August 2009 – April 2010
Planning start (M/Y): August / 2009
Beginning of construction: May / 2010
Completion: September / 2010

Inside Out by Takeshi Hosaka Architects

Inside Out by Takeshi Hosaka Architects

Inside Out by Takeshi Hosaka Architects

Inside Out by Takeshi Hosaka Architects

Inside Out by Takeshi Hosaka Architects

Inside Out by Takeshi Hosaka Architects


See also:

.

House I by
Yoshichika Takagi
Duplex House in Tokito by
Hidehiro Fukuda Architects
House in Hieidaira
by Tato Architects
  • stefabn

    the ever amazing japanese architects

  • Aaron

    This is brilliant. Fantastic dissolving of internal and 'external' spaces. Remarkably poetic and remarkably practical (yes, apart from the small children argument).

  • Swean

    N house, is that you?

    • Swan

      No, N house is by Sou Fujimoto !

  • Andy

    I'm not gonna lie. I'm kind of in love with this house.

  • Eska

    …unfortunately this is not the best time to launch a house in tokyo which is open to rain, wind etc.. but apart from that is it ever a good idea or just gimmicky?

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Zafar-Tashmukhamedov/100000846182818 Zafar Tashmukhamedov

    Japanese are first! They know this style

  • yuc

    So lovely.

    The mute hermetic outside hides the wonders inside.

    I wish that such clients increase all around the world.

  • nina

    i just luv the fact that they live the way they want, no matter how, we should learn from that…

  • pedro

    brilliant… maybe some 'real' outside space would be a plus, but the interior is fantastic. I could live in it!

  • john

    since the like & dislike options, people have stopped putting a lot of drivel on the comments, it feels so much better like this, positive!

  • tomas

    what's so new about this?? the architecture is nice but c'mon this inner patios exist since 1300BC! I love them but not try to sell us such a novelty!

    • yuc

      That is all about it Tomas. Architecture is not always supposed to be a matter of innovation, like cell-phones or i-pods. I believe we as humans haven't changed much since 1300 BC.

      The quality this design, I believe, concerns the interpretation of the relationship between nature and man's built world, rather than simply creating an atrium or whatever.

  • http://www.artphotowalldecor.com Art

    That's a great way to enjoy the outdoors when you only have a tiny space to work with. I like that equal consideration was given to the cats!

  • soto

    Very nice! Living there in winter might be a little hard though… Tokyo winters can be freezing.

  • http://www.twitter.com/youQuaren LotsaOoohs

    I am really amused with the Japanese architects especially with their interiors. Very simple on the outside, but surprisingly fantastic on the inside, used the space so well. It's a bit of complicated though.

  • http://www.littlebeatrice.com Greg

    Konnichiwa,

    I really like how the house has so many treehouse like amenities, and

    indoor vegetation. Ee dess Nay!

    Greg

  • solstråle

    my complete admiration goes to japanese architecture and architects!! they use space so well! but yes how about winter? and the water…wouldn't it rust surfaces unless it is dried properly? i am inlove with this house though!!