Thin Office by Studio SKLIM

| 8 comments

Thin Office by SKLIM

Singapore based architects Studio SKLIM created built-in platforms, seating and storage for this renovation of an office in a post-war building on the outskirts of Singapore.

Thin Office by SKLIM

Created for an IT and multi-media company, the office has been designed to retain the exisiting light fittings, ceiling and walls.

Thin Office by SKLIM

The interior includes a raised meeting space with storage space beneath.

Thin Office by SKLIM

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Thin Office by SKLIM

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Photographs from Studio SKLIM and Jeremy San

The following is from the architects:


Thin Office
@ Jalan Besar, Singapore

CLIENT : Kido Technologies
PROGRAM : Interior Refurbishment (Office)

Thin Office by SKLIM

AREA : 120 m²
CONSTRUCTION COST : Confidential

Thin Office by SKLIM

STATUS : Completed
DESIGN ARCHITECT : Studio SKLIM

Thin Office by SKLIM

KEY PERSONNEL : Kevin Lim
MAIN PHOTOGRAPHY : Jeremy San
TIME PERIOD : 2010

Thin Office by SKLIM

 

 

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

“Work is where you are, work has become a state of mind.”
Paola Antonelli, curator of MoMA’s dept of Architecture and Design  - 2001 exhibition “Work Spheres”.

Thin Office by SKLIM

While tapping on a laptop in a cafe has become the ubiquitous platform to begin "work",  the need for a permanent work environment for any office is still necessary in the long run.  Perhaps what has changed since the advent of  "coffee offices" has been the increasing need for flexibility within a sedentary work sphere.

Thin Office by SKLIM

The program brief was for an office space shared by an IT company and a multi-media setup.  Located in a refurbished postwar building right in Singapore's CBD outskirts, the space was long and narrow with split levels, offering the possibility of a raised space.

Thin Office by SKLIM

Throughout the long and narrow office, the ceiling and wall conditions were left unaltered as much as possible, along with the existing light fixtures.

Thin Office by SKLIM

The designed space was to reflect the ethos of the companies: Flexibility, Technology and Creativity.  The office space was  loosely organised into 8 clusters namely: the Boss Boxes, Long Work Top , Discussion Table, Welcome Mat, Sanitary & Storage, Recharging Point, Twist Platform and Multi-media Corner.

Thin Office by SKLIM

Each of these clusters were arranged around an open plan configuration with the exception of Sanitary & Storage to allow a multifarious overlap of working trajectories.

Thin Office by SKLIM

The flexible working environment was kept in mind with the possibility of hot-desking, informal working clusters and also semi-private cubicles.  The Boss Boxes were an option for more privacy as some work required a certain level of seclusion.

Thin Office by SKLIM

Technology is a crucial aspect of any modern day office and the ease of being "connected" to either an internet network or a power source was one of the concerns of the client.  The fluctuating size of the workforce also meant flexible working spaces which could be contracted and expanded to fit the demands of this office.

Thin Office by SKLIM

The result was the "Long Work Top" which incorporated an ingenious power strip of  data points, power supply and telecommunication points to be accessible at any location along this table, expanding the number of workstations from 6 to 10 in a few minutes!

Thin Office by SKLIM

This single piece of stretched work surface became part of a greater string of furniture transforming from table top, reception seating, storage and finally  to pantry space.

Thin Office by SKLIM

The Twist Platform was a raised meeting pod that capitalised on the higher ceiling to incorporate storage beneath.

Thin Office by SKLIM

The geometry of the subtly twisting space was driven by sightlines, privacy and anthropometrics.

Thin Office by SKLIM

The unconventional form in an otherwise sleek and straightforward office space added a dynamic backdrop to the Recharging Point and provided privacy to the independent operation of the multi-media setup.

Thin Office by SKLIM

The giant overhead light fixture was a final touch to the suggestion of this event space

Thin Office by SKLIM

The essence of this "Thin Office" was a desire to remain anonymous and to provide a blank canvas for various work scenarios and possibilities.

Thin Office by SKLIM

This "thinness" was translated from the basic organisation of spaces which opened up a central thoroughfare for circulation, light and natural ventilation, through to the furniture details which celebrated the geometrical state of being folded, suspended or twisted.


See also:

.

Redhill Apartment by
Studio SKLIM
WOW Sendai by
Upsetters Architects
Brandbase Pallets by
Most Architecture
| 8 comments

Posted on Tuesday, April 12th, 2011 at 5:00 pm by Kate Parker. See our copyright policy. Before commenting, please read our comments policy.

  • eugmir

    curious to see photos of the white floor after a couple weeks use

  • http://giant-squib.blogspot.com/ Giant Squib

    Absolutely love it! Can't get enough of this kind of thing.
    Employees should simply be made to take off shoes rather than scuff the imaculate floors :P

  • idp

    i bet it wont look good after users really work in the space with all their stuff..

  • I.P. Freely

    Ah, man…the toner got all over the wall and floor!

  • Suvin

    I noticed that the only person present in the photograph is wearing white too. Hey perhaps the employees should all be made to wear white to match the interiors! Can't have anything diluting the purity of the white, white space. Why not take it a step further? White stationary… white desktops…

    Am only partly joking. It remains to be seen whether such a pristine setting stands up to the wear and dirt of a working office. I may be wrong. I know of people with the discipline to work the ethos of this design into the way they live (eg, taking shoes off to not scuff a white painted wooden floor…) But this discipline is a lot harder to enforce in a communal space with many different personalities. Could be a positive thing though, if this whiteness is seen as a blank slate to be filled with colours :-)

  • Dozozo

    Ah well we do not see people complaining about whiteness in Museums. Its a lifestyle choice. Seems to make the space larger than expected as its pretty narrow. Great work on the space!

  • nina

    its depressing…

  • Johnny

    Great work, love it simple and pure and to the point!