House in Ropponmatsu by Kazunori Fujimoto
Architect & Associates

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House in Ropponmatsu by Kazunori Fujimoto

Japanese firm Kazunori Fujimoto Architect & Associates have completed a concrete house in Fukuoka that resembles a half-submerged submarine.

House in Ropponmatsu by Kazunori Fujimoto

House in Ropponmatsu has an L-shaped profile, with the first and second storeys set back so as not to overshadow neighbouring properties.

House in Ropponmatsu by Kazunori Fujimoto

Outward-facing windows were rejected on the ground floor of the bunker-like house in favour of glazed walls that overlook two enclosed courtyards.

House in Ropponmatsu by Kazunori Fujimoto

Instead, the only outwardly visible windows are placed at the top of the three-storey turret, which resembles a conning tower.

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House in Ropponmatsu by Kazunori Fujimoto

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House in Ropponmatsu by Kazunori Fujimoto

Photography is by Kazunori Fujimoto.

Here are some more details from the architect:


House in Ropponmatsu

 

This house is located in the city area near by the center of Fukuoka city. The shape of the site is long and narrow, 6m x 18m.

House in Ropponmatsu by Kazunori Fujimoto

We designed this house not to make the shade on the north house next door, as a result, the house with three floors shaped like ''L''.

House in Ropponmatsu by Kazunori Fujimoto

In contrast to closed outside like a silent sculptural volume, the interior is designed well-lighted and well-opened.

House in Ropponmatsu by Kazunori Fujimoto

At the ground floor level, we can look whole the long distance of the site through from entrance court to bedroom.

House in Ropponmatsu by Kazunori Fujimoto

Each room is filled with light and breeze from the two courts.

House in Ropponmatsu by Kazunori Fujimoto

The storage and bathroom are placed in the second floor, and another bedroom is in the third floor.

House in Ropponmatsu by Kazunori Fujimoto

At third floor level, keeping a distance from the road, we can get wide range of view, from near the garden tree in the next door, to the faraway mountains.

House in Ropponmatsu by Kazunori Fujimoto

The simple form, found by the condition of the site, has been transformed into an affluent space for living.

House in Ropponmatsu by Kazunori Fujimoto

Location: Fukuoka, Japan
Main use: house

House in Ropponmatsu by Kazunori Fujimoto

Site area: 121m2
Building area: 71.99m2
Total floor area: 99.16m2
Design term: 2010
Construction term: 2011

House in Ropponmatsu by Kazunori Fujimoto

Click above for larger image

House in Ropponmatsu by Kazunori Fujimoto

Click above for larger image

House in Ropponmatsu by Kazunori Fujimoto

Click above for larger image

House in Ropponmatsu by Kazunori Fujimoto

Click above for larger image

House in Ropponmatsu by Kazunori Fujimoto

Click above for larger image

  • psycho killer

    it's looks like a tanker or a submarine…

  • http://www.facebook.com/jrodriguez64 Juan Rodriguez

    Horrible, submarino o panteon :(

  • Fluid

    pretty depressing

  • Jez

    depressive… I like minimalism, but this is too much for me…

  • guest

    Or jail.

  • http://www.dailygrail.com Red Pill Junkie

    They will have to decorate this house with very colorful and dynamic furniture in order to infuse some life into it.

  • wasguy

    I say it again – I’m glad I don’t live in Japan

  • http://www.deloprojet.com delo

    This is a good space for to work, not for live.

  • Nitin

    it would be interesting to see the images with the people living in the house.

  • http://autarkic.org J.Leo

    Don't think I want to live in a submarine. Unless it is the Yellow Submarine.

  • leshumanoides

    it need a big, colorful graffiti on the outside wall

  • alakri

    People who think a building needs to be 'Colorful' to be lively, should stay put in Disneyland. Labeling everything that is minimalistic in Nature or made in Concrete as 'depressive' is nonsensical gibberish.

  • Hercule Poirot

    Very smart : when you're working in the kitchen the light is coming from behind you. The windoz looks out on a dark hague about one meter in front of you. The zenital light is only for … the garden ! Sing-Sing looks like a friendly kindergarten compared to this.

  • miguel

    great work but the photos are not good enough to please dezeen readers

  • pablo romagnoli

    Como maqueta es agradable, a las fotos les falta muebles y "personas" que diseñen su espacio.

  • Ummmm

    I have come to the conclusion that I don't understand japanese architecture, I mean, how can anyone like it?

  • logorithm

    I like it! It's bright, and most of all, it will survive a tsunami.

  • Sam

    Stair access is slightly awkward at ground level, whoever gets the ground floor bedroom is going to little privacy.

  • compost

    I like it. The form is powerful. For the passerby it is a mystery.

  • EJ_re

    It looks so cold to live in this house even in summer too.
    If i were a dweller, i would feel i'm a prisoner.
    I think the Japanese tend to like building house like that.

  • ya-el

    its beutiful but so very sad
    no connection to the life in the street – i guess you did not read any walkabilty reserch

  • roland berengena

    I am amazed at the number of negative comments made about this residence. The worst one advocates graffiti all over the exterior concrete walls. Partly the designer is at fault, but mostly for presenting this project with photographs of the interiors shot on an overcast day. There are no strong shadows and this lack of sunshine in the interiors made many respondents think of the building as underground or underwater spaces. There are certainly windows or glass doors that would permit outside light to brighten up those interiors.

    The other problem with the presentation is the lack of furnishings to help humanize the spaces. Anyone who has ever gone apartment or house hunting knows how lousy interiors look without furniture. An experienced real estate agent would never present a hot property without some jazzy decor to sell it.

    • Hercule Poirot

      Imagine the kitchen space with bright sunlight: It will be even worse because the person at work will have to do it in his own dark shadow. Maybe Japanese housewives/-man don't have the same ideas on practical aspects of a building, but I wouldn't roll my sushi there. Not mentioning the dust : full concrete and a white lacquered or melamine kitchen furniture. They have a maid, that's for sure !
      About the furniture : what the hall could you place in such an overwhelming environment ? An electric chair ?
      Even art to bring some colour (if wanted) will be reduced to sculpture if you don't want to ruin the wall surfaces. Maybe they can put some flowers in the serial holes ? But it looks already like a columbarium now.

  • Fil

    Concrete architecture isn't for everyone.

    But it's for me.

    Well done.

  • Lauren

    this looks very Tadao Ando.. but a little more contemporary with the stark white room. love it.