Glass Loggia House by Allen Jack+Cottier,
Vladimir Sitta and Belinda Koopman

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Glass Loggia House by Allen Jack+Cottier, Vladimir Sitta and Belinda Koopman

An oversailing glass roof and steel mesh curtain protect a two-storey extension and terrace at a historic Sydney house.

Glass Loggia House by Allen Jack+Cottier, Vladimir Sitta and Belinda Koopman

The double-height curtain provides shade and privacy but can be drawn back to open the house to the remodelled garden.

Glass Loggia House by Allen Jack+Cottier, Vladimir Sitta and Belinda Koopman

Australian architects Allen Jack+Cottier converted the High Victorian house in collaboration with designer Belinda Koopman, while the garden was redesigned by Vladimir Sitta.

Glass Loggia House by Allen Jack+Cottier, Vladimir Sitta and Belinda Koopman

The house formerly contained a private zoo, according to the architects.

Glass Loggia House by Allen Jack+Cottier, Vladimir Sitta and Belinda Koopman

Glass Loggia House was recently awarded two Houses magazine awards.

Glass Loggia House by Allen Jack+Cottier, Vladimir Sitta and Belinda Koopman

While this house uses a mesh curtain for cooling and privacy, we recently published a house that achieves the same using mist - see our earlier story here.

Glass Loggia House by Allen Jack+Cottier, Vladimir Sitta and Belinda Koopman

See also our previous story about a sports centre designed by Allen Jack+Cottier.

Glass Loggia House by Allen Jack+Cottier, Vladimir Sitta and Belinda Koopman

Photography is by Nic Bailey of Allen Jack+Cottier.

Glass Loggia House by Allen Jack+Cottier, Vladimir Sitta and Belinda Koopman

Here's some more information from the architects:


Glass Loggia House wins two prestigious HOUSES Magazine awards for design excellence
18th July 2011

Allen Jack+Cottier, Belinda Koopman and Vladimir Sitta of Terragram, have been honoured among Australia’s best house, garden and apartment designers at the inaugural HOUSES magazine awards in Melbourne on Friday evening, for their work on Glass Loggia House in Glebe, NSW.

Glass Loggia House by Allen Jack+Cottier, Vladimir Sitta and Belinda Koopman

Their transformation of the dark rear living spaces and run down garden of a grand two storey High Victorian style residence in Sydney’s inner west won the Outside category, and also a High Commendation for House Alteration and Addition under 200 m2.

Glass Loggia House by Allen Jack+Cottier, Vladimir Sitta and Belinda Koopman

The judges noted “The approach of both the landscape architect and architect respects the remnants of the past, adding another layer to history. Through a suite of new spaces the house and garden is now more engaged with the people who live there... The walls, rooms, corridors, platforms, and curtains create a palpable ambiguity about what is inside and outside, old and new.”

Glass Loggia House by Allen Jack+Cottier, Vladimir Sitta and Belinda Koopman

The house was originally a private zoo, so when work started in 2003 Vladimir Sitta retained and reused building fabric remnants to construct a “Garden of Ghosts” with a polished concrete pool ‘fenced’ by a fish skeleton vitrine and plant filled moat.

Glass Loggia House by Allen Jack+Cottier, Vladimir Sitta and Belinda Koopman

Jim Koopman, Director – Architecture, Allen Jack+Cottier, said “ We conceived a double volume glass loggia sheltered on the west by an existing cypress stand to create a useable outdoor area in a way that responds to the grand scale of the existing building ,and was appropriate to the conservation area.

Glass Loggia House by Allen Jack+Cottier, Vladimir Sitta and Belinda Koopman

Click above for larger image

“The loggia and new rooms are designed to exploit the ambiguities between what is inside and what is outside with a dramatic external steel mesh curtain shading the whole north- west facade, which operates to transform the loggia and garden spaces for different family functions.”

Glass Loggia House by Allen Jack+Cottier, Vladimir Sitta and Belinda Koopman

Click above for larger image

  • 1plus2minus3

    This is a beautiful house, love the lightheartedness of the design, cheers!

  • http://www.displaysdirect.com.au Amandaf

    The curtain element is amazing. Is it something that will rust in future?

  • Katsudon

    Wow! Awesome! Those kind of outside/inside space are a wonderful way of living.

  • Al-Ishaq

    I love this so much. The elements all together make it so wonderful but I dont know how an exterior curtain would work in open weather.

  • nind

    remind me of shigeru ban.but with different twist

  • Oliver

    bet you didn't see the cat

  • Twist

    Bet you didn't see the dog

  • syarifa

    i wanna live on it…with the dog and the cat

  • Vlynna

    Very nicely executed. The climate must lend itself to this design.